The Cardinal (No, Not the Guy in Rome)

@Raelove (16820)
Saco, Maine
July 10, 2016 7:20am CST
I told @JudyEv that I would try to get another photo of the northern cardinal that's been showing up here, and last night, I was able to. Here he is, in all his red glory. I say "he," because the female is not nearly as striking with her olive-brown feathers and only light red coloring. They both, however, produce the same rich song that has clear bell-like notes and drowns out that of lots of other birds. It's part of the mating ritual, as the male uses his song to announce to the others that this is HIS territory and not theirs. I toss birdseed on the ground out there once in awhile, so there is always something for them to peck at. Interestingly enough, I've almost always seen cardinals later in the day before dusk or on rainy days. And I always hear one before I see it, as it announces its presence outside my window in its typically grand way. Photo Copyright@2016 Rachel Lovejoy
8 people like this
10 responses
@LadyDuck (141817)
• Switzerland
10 Jul 16
Those little birds are beautiful, so nice and colorful. Definitely a lot better than the guys in Rome.
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
Oh yeah. Though I've often wondered who took the name first: the guys or the birds. The bird's scientific name is Cardinalis Cardinalis. Did the cardinals in Rome borrow the name because they wore red outfits, or did the birds get the name because they copied the cardinals? I like to think the birds got it first!
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@LadyDuck (141817)
• Switzerland
10 Jul 16
@Raelove Nothing to do with the birds, the term Cardinal (Cardinale in Italian) comes from the Latin word "cardo" meaning hinge, or pivot. I suppose due to their role to help the Pope.
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
@LadyDuck It also means "primary," as in a "cardinal number." So again, that reflects on the "primary role" the cardinals play in the Pope's political life.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Jul 16
Since we took the feeder down we don't see the cardinals very often, but it can be anytime dawn to dusk. Since God made the birds I would assume they were here first!
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
Hey, I like that idea a lot. They WERE here first. I just wonder when they were named and who named them. I want them to have gotten the name first, darn it.
@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
@AbbyGreenhill I did. All I came up with was that the bird was named after the Roman cardinals. Still looking!
@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
@Raelove According to this, the bird was named after the card1125, "one of the ecclesiastical princes who constitute the sacred college," from L. cardinalis "principal, chief, essential," from cardo (gen. cardinis) "that on which something turns or depends," originally "door hinge." Ecclesiastical use began for the presbyters of the chief (cardinal) churches of Rome. The adj. sense of "chief, principal" in Eng. is attested from c.1440. Cardinal numbers (1591) are the primitive "one, two, three," etc. as opposed to ordinal numbers "first, second, third," etc. Cardinal points (1549) are "north, south, east, west." The cardinal virtues (c.1300) were divided into natural (justice prudence, temperance, fortitude) and theological (faith, hope, charity). The N.Amer. songbird (Cardinalis virginianus) is attested from 1678, so named for its resemblance to the red robes of the cardinals.inals.
@Susan2015 (20001)
• United States
10 Jul 16
What a great picture. We have a pair of Cardinals that sometimes come to the bird feeders. The female is barely red as far as I can tell compared to the male one. The male on is hard to miss when he's out there.
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
Thanks. You're right. The female is not colorful at all, but you can't miss the male.
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@Susan2015 (20001)
• United States
10 Jul 16
@Raelove The male one I can spot in an instant. The female one sometimes I miss her as she can kind of blend in with the grass. I can see her better if she's up on a tree branch.
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
@Susan2015 Yup. They both sing the same, though, which is great.
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• United States
11 Jul 16
He certainly is strikingly beautiful
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
11 Jul 16
That he is.
@Corbin5 (96379)
• United States
10 Jul 16
I love catches a glimpse of the cardinals that visit us here. Wish they would visit more often!
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
We've got lots around here. I remember them from the last time I lived in this town.
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@JudyEv (115697)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jul 16
You have scored a really lovely photo here! I'm really impressed - and doesn't he blend well with the surroundings?
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
Yes. Like a friend on Facebook pointed out, he's almost camouflaged!
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@skysnap (17674)
10 Jul 16
wow that looks like cool.
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
Thanks...
@JohnRoberts (49320)
• Los Angeles, California
10 Jul 16
Terrific shot that really shows that bright Cardinal red.
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
Thanks! The light was just right.
@responsiveme (14225)
• India
10 Jul 16
That was a great visitor for you. And I too think the birds got it first, the name I mean.
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
I hope so!
@sofssu (14512)
10 Jul 16
It is a beautiful bird! I love bird watching and taking pictures of them.
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@Raelove (16820)
• Saco, Maine
10 Jul 16
Thanks. So do I.
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