Why politicians shouldn't expect to be loved and admired (or even believed)

@boiboing (12533)
Northampton, England
July 11, 2016 6:10am CST
Here in the UK our political elite are in a tizzy over leadership. The Labour Party leader has very little support among his MPs but massive support among the party membership and is heading for a showdown with his parliamentary colleagues. The Labour Party came up with the crazy idea of giving party members - who pay a tiny fee to join up - an equal vote with the MPs and trade unions and got their last leadership election hijacked by the far left. Speculation is rife that the party will have to split if he retains leadership. The guy has all the charisma of week old leftovers. The Conservatives are also in a mess. The current PM resigned post-referendum, his assumed successor realised that even he didn't believe the rot he'd been spouting and discovered that if he became prime minister, not everybody would love him any more. It's one thing swanning around London handing out free bikes and an entirely different one going into negotiate withdrawal from Europe with at least half the population (remember, a lot weren't allowed to vote - the ones who've lived here for many years but don't hold British passports) hating you. The Conservatives narrowed down Cameron's successor candidates to two people - and one has roundly shot herself in the foot over some unfortunate comments implying that because she's pushed out a few babies, she's got superpowers that her childless opponent can't match. The media have (rightly) ripped her limb from limb and she wants to pull out because they've been nasty to her. Clearly she didn't learn anything about playground fighting from all those children. When will politicians realise that you can't please all of the people all of the time and you can't expect to be loved? You're not Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny and if you're after adoration and adulation, go start a cult and brainwash some impressionable folk. Don't try to be a politician.
14 people like this
12 responses
12 Jul 16
Ain't politics grand? Bunch of muppets!
2 people like this
@JohnRoberts (34042)
• Los Angeles, California
11 Jul 16
Sounds like the UK political party system is as much a mess as the US.
1 person likes this
@boiboing (12533)
• Northampton, England
11 Jul 16
No, we're not quite THAT bad.
1 person likes this
@boiboing (12533)
• Northampton, England
11 Jul 16
@JohnRoberts We can never get a prime minister who isn't first and MP. Your situation with Trump thankfully can't happen here. They do get quite boistrous in the house but they don't scream and they never swear - for that you have to try the Australians.
1 person likes this
@RasmaSandra (10393)
• Riga, Latvia
11 Jul 16
@boiboing If you sprinkled in some of the loons here in Latvia you'd have a very fine fruit salad.
@LadyDuck (108725)
• Switzerland
11 Jul 16
You are right, if someone decides to be a politician he (she) must expect not to be loved by a large number of people. I live here from 10 years, but I cannot vote because I have not a Swiss Passport, but I still can vote in Italy, that I left 42 years ago.
1 person likes this
@boiboing (12533)
• Northampton, England
11 Jul 16
Isn't it crazy. Here in the UK the vote would have gone the other way if they'd allowed long term non-Brit residents (like my Portuguese friend who has been here 24 years) a vote. Those people never applied for passports because they didn't NEED them - because of the open borders policy and then they lost their voice because of it.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (108725)
• Switzerland
11 Jul 16
@boiboing I think that it's not fair not to let vote people who live in a country from many years. We were not even allowed to vote when three close villages planned to merge and they asked the population their preference. I am glad that the majority choose not to merge, but I was upset not to be able to vote. I pay the taxes after all.
@boiboing (12533)
• Northampton, England
11 Jul 16
@LadyDuck That's exactly how my friend feels. She has spent her whole working life in the UK, paid taxes, bought homes, fully contributed to the country and the economy.
1 person likes this
@SIMPLYD (72999)
• Philippines
12 Jul 16
That is true . If one wants to go into politics , he should have a strong heart to face all the negatives and positives of being a politician .
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (111525)
• Boise, Idaho
11 Jul 16
There is always something that someone will not like about a politician. It is normal.
@boiboing (12533)
• Northampton, England
11 Jul 16
Absolutely. If they all love you, you're definitely doing something wrong.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (111525)
• Boise, Idaho
14 Jul 16
@boiboing .....You have to have a certain agenda and go with it.
@Mike197602 (13310)
• Worcester, England
11 Jul 16
I don't think the cons are in a mess. I expect there will be a smooth handover of power to thereasa may...labour are plain unelectable and will be for a while to come.
@boiboing (12533)
• Northampton, England
11 Jul 16
I'm very happy that idiot woman has ruled herself out. The way things are going these days, she might have got elected.
@cacay1 (30436)
• Cagayan De Oro, Philippines
18 Jul 16
There is so much problem and conflict in politics.
@gudheart (12808)
14 Jul 16
I think all of them are corrupt in one way or another.
@Jessicalynnt (48172)
• Centralia, Missouri
11 Jul 16
lol and not everyone even likes santa or the easter bunny!
@koopharper (6032)
• Canada
11 Jul 16
Reality is a pretty harsh thing. Congrats to your countryman's Wimbledon win.
@else34 (13615)
• New Delhi, India
11 Jul 16
@boiboing,I have little idea about politics in your country,but politicians in our country are no better.In fact,they are worse.However there are still some politicians here who are honest and disciplined.
• New Delhi, India
11 Jul 16
Blaming game which they played with each other is the main reason for their this sought of image.