The Bronze Age!

United States
July 15, 2016 4:57am CST
I would have loved to be a part of this archaeological dig! Now if you know me, you know I have a sort of "pick and choose" love of history. I came across this article on one of the many facebook groups I follow. The article entails all of the findings from a small village that was ravished by fire and seems to have sunk into the water nearby. Remarkably enough, a great deal of the stuff they found are in good condition considering their resting place for the past several thousand years. All types of domestic goods were found from bowls and storage containers to fabrics that were used to make clothing. It seems that our bronze age ancestors were able to accumulate quite a lot of goods, and even had a decent few things that they apparently got whilst trading. History in school never made this stuff seem so interesting as what I've been reading lately. In fact, the bronze age is probably one the time periods I least remember studying in school. Here's the article to which I refer : The article provides a good few pictures, one of which I have to chuckle at. The caption, as you'll notice, states "Human footprints" well I mean it IS an archaeology dig so I can't imagine these footprints, in what appears to be fresh mud, is from our ancestors 3000 years ago. Though of course, the caption writer would have us think that.
Excavation of a site in the Cambridgeshire fens reveals a Bronze Age settlement with connections far beyond its watery location.
6 people like this
6 responses
@topffer (34111)
• France
15 Jul 16
The preservation of woods is exceptional and it is something very rare. I have had to excavate a few bronze age sites when I was a city archeologist. I did it only because it was part of my job : I am specialized in Roman archeology and I never found very exciting to excavate Bronze Age sites. At best you find usually a bit of coal from the posts in the postholes of the buildings. Seeing the axe, I remember that I found about 30 years ago something more rare : a casting mold for axes. It was 2 or 3 centuries older than this axe. One of my best friends is a Bronze Age archeologist. I do not know if he is aware of this site, and I send him a link to the article.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Jul 16
I am glad I was able to give you something to send on to your friend. Wow a mold to make axes? How neat was that! Definitely not something I would think one would find. There must be a lot more that can be found from Roman excavation sites than there would be for Bronze aged sites. Of course, I just find anything found from any age to be remarkable!
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@topffer (34111)
• France
15 Jul 16
@ScribbledAdNauseum If he does not know this site, he will be certainly glad. The mold was in a pit with a few broken bronze items destined to be reshaped, and it is indeed not common to find a deposit during an excavation. You also need a bit of luck in this job. We have still a few places available for volunteers during summer in our excavation programs. They are usually intended for students in archeology, but if you visit France and want to spend at least a week on an excavation site, just tell it to me 2 or 3 months before, and I will find you an excavation site of the remarkable period of your choice, except in prehistory, as prehistorians are a bit picky when it comes to accept volunteers on their excavations. But no problem for Bronze or Iron Age. I cannot guarantee that the site will be remarkable and that you will discover something exceptional though.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Jul 16
@topffer Thank you for the offer. Obviously we never know what could happen at a dig. I am sure there have been digs where you've walked away with very little from the effort.
1 person likes this
@Asylum (48281)
• Manchester, England
15 Jul 16
I do not wish to demean the importance of the Bronze Age, which was a very important aspect of our development. Nevertheless it is just one among a series of significant stages through which society developed and I view them all with equal import.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Jul 16
I understand what you mean. There are, of course, other time periods that brought us more advancements. I don't honestly remember studying much of the bronze age whilst in school.
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@JESSY3236 (6505)
• United States
15 Jul 16
That's interesting. It's neat what they can find while digging.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Jul 16
It makes me wonder who first though "ooh let's dig for ancient civilization!" But yes, it's very neat what one can find. Even whilst metal detecting.
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@nomus24g (22907)
• India
15 Jul 16
those were subjects to study during schooldays
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Jul 16
Though the instructors, with their nasal drones, would make it ever so boring.
@alberello75 (17490)
• Genova, Italy
15 Jul 16
Probably in school to me, it was mentioned the story of the Bronze Age. But I do not remember anything about. Keep in mind that I have finished school almost 20 years ago (1997).
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Jul 16
I am sure everyone has studied it atleast a little...
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@jstory07 (66984)
• Roseburg, Oregon
16 Jul 16
I would love to be at a dig site and see all the stuff that they dig up. that would be very exciting.