What's in a name?

@garymarsh6 (11913)
United Kingdom
July 27, 2016 2:30pm CST
In my previous post @vandana7 asked why an Earls wife is called a countess. Throughout Europe members of the Royal families are known by certain titles such as Count, Duke, Duc, Dauphin, Prince, Countess Compte. Etc etc I will try to explain the order or Rank of British Royal titles. King - Queen. Prince - Princess Duke - Duchess Marquess -Marchioness. Earl - Countess. ( So @vandana7 an Earl is the equivalent of a Count or Comte in Europe there is no equivalent for Earl for example Earless) Viscount - Viscountess. Baron- Baroness (Maybe addressed as Lord or Lady) Baronets With the title Sir or Dame. (A knighthood) Esquire Gentleman Usually the Monarch can bestow a gift on a citizen of the United Kingdom as a personal gift. In the past this may or may not have included a parcel of land or an estate. Some of these titles were hereditary which means that they can be passed on to the offspring of the Duke or Lord or whoever. There are some titles that are not hereditary. Most titles such as a knighthood are recommendations to the monarch by the government. A King. He may have a Queen. A Queen would not have a King as a husband but he would be either a Prince and given the title Duke for example Prince Philip Duke of Edinburgh. Queen Victoria’s husband Was Prince Albert Prince Consort. On coming of age or other such occasion like a marriage the Queen gave other titles to her male children. Prince Charles became Prince of Wales. Duke of Cornwall Prince Andrew became Duke of York. Prince Edward became Earl of Wessex Princess Ann became the Princess Royal. A personal gift to the Princess. It can be quite complicated but the above is a simplified account of British titles. One of the highest ranking positions is the Earl Marshall currently the Duke of Norfolk. His family seat is Arundel castle in Sussex. It is his job to ensure that big state occasions run like clockwork for example The State opening of Parliament or organising a state funeral and Coronations. He would ensure that the invitations were sent out to the right people and in order of rank. It would be his job to manage the whole affair ensuring that every single detail is followed to the letter. The title was created by King John II for Thomas Mowbray. All the Dukes of Norfolk can be traced back to King Edward I. I hope that this has made it clear in some way. It can be quite complicated the more you look into it.
26 people like this
24 responses
@MALUSE (28624)
• Denmark
27 Jul 16
It's obvious why there is no female form of Earl. It would mean a person without ears.
11 people like this
@vandana7 (55218)
• India
27 Jul 16
Wow...it never occurred to me...
5 people like this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
27 Jul 16
Yes true and how would they keep their spectacles on?
2 people like this
@Asylum (45897)
• Manchester, England
27 Jul 16
Oh excellent, I do like that comment.
3 people like this
@Hatley (151963)
• Garden Grove, California
27 Jul 16
thatis wonderful a very informative post I learn something here most everyda y
6 people like this
@vandana7 (55218)
• India
27 Jul 16
I am happy he remembered..though I troubled him to...
4 people like this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
27 Jul 16
@vandana7 It is never a trouble! It was my pleasure!
1 person likes this
@Hatley (151963)
• Garden Grove, California
27 Jul 16
@vandana7 nope you nev er trouble peop[l;e you always have something really interesting to say hugs.
2 people like this
@Inlemay (17162)
• South Africa
27 Jul 16
clear as daylight - very interesting indeed - what title was given to the abdicated King?
3 people like this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
27 Jul 16
He became the Duke of Windsor!
2 people like this
@Inlemay (17162)
• South Africa
27 Jul 16
@garymarsh6 there you have it - I was hoping you would have included it in your "personal gift" column
1 person likes this
@amadeo (41864)
• United States
27 Jul 16
Gary,very informative there.Thank you for sharing this with us
3 people like this
@egdcltd (5697)
27 Jul 16
The Dukes of Norfolk have also had that title taken away from them on numerous occasions (boiling down to annoying the monarch).
2 people like this
@vandana7 (55218)
• India
27 Jul 16
Some Dukes never learn..
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
27 Jul 16
There have always been funny goings on depending on who was flavour of the month I guess!
1 person likes this
@egdcltd (5697)
27 Jul 16
@garymarsh6 One problem Norfolk has had has been remaining Catholic.
1 person likes this
@DianneN (52729)
• United States
28 Jul 16
You may refer to me as Lady Di, although my hubs treats me like a princess and my sons consider me the queen of the family. Lol!
2 people like this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
28 Jul 16
Ha ha I know I told my daughter once I may treat you and call you Princess but never be under any illusion that you are one now go wash your cup up! LOL
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (48429)
• Pleasant Hill, California
4 Sep 16
I usually consider myself to be High Priest (or Philosopher-King, depending on my mood) of whatever I'm involved in.
2 people like this
@Mike197602 (13309)
• Worcester, England
27 Jul 16
I've looked at the ranks list a lot I think I get it now and would probably be able to list them in order if asked. Weird that back in the day the class system was based on titles and such whereas now even the US claims to have an upper class but they have no titled aristocracy
2 people like this
@Corbin5 (69823)
• United States
27 Jul 16
Sure made it clear to me! We have a knight, Sir Admiral Richard Haddock, but probably not a Baronet. Now, I am confused, but the knight thing is good enough for this ancestor; 11th great granddaughter.
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
28 Jul 16
You are practically royalty!
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (69823)
• United States
29 Jul 16
@garymarsh6 My dad's family has, I think more like had, Corbin Hall in England. I believe Admiral Haddock's son had a monument built in his father's honor too. Admiral Haddock, kt, was not a very handsome man. Yikes!
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For his son, also Comptroller of the Navy, see Richard Haddock (1673-1751). Richard Haddock Born 1629 Leigh-on-Sea Died 26 January 1714 London Allegiance  Kingdom of England  Kingdom of Grea
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
29 Jul 16
@Corbin5 He appeared as they would do in those days I guess for that time he was handsome! He is buried in Leigh on Sea which is only around 30 miles from where I live. I could not find a Corbin hall but there was a Corbyn Hall which was in Warwickshire also known as the Black country due to the use of coal and industrialisation. There is a Corbin Hall in Virginia though.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (48429)
• Pleasant Hill, California
31 Aug 16
Are Duke and Earl different in any way?
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
4 Sep 16
A Duke is of a much higher rank than an Earl in the great scheme of Royal titles.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (48429)
• Pleasant Hill, California
4 Sep 16
@garymarsh6 If they can be siblings, what entitles one to be Duke, rather than Earl?
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (90145)
• Bunbury, Australia
28 Jul 16
Interesting information thanks. It must get pretty complicated for the Duke of Norfolk when there is a big occasion to organise.
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
28 Jul 16
I don't think I would like his job one little bit.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (90145)
• Bunbury, Australia
29 Jul 16
@garymarsh6 All the heirarchy of it - and this one probably doesn't talk to that one, etc.
@Asylum (45897)
• Manchester, England
27 Jul 16
You missed me off the bottom Gary where the title of Peasant fits.
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
27 Jul 16
@Asylum that's you and me both then!
1 person likes this
@Asylum (45897)
• Manchester, England
27 Jul 16
@garymarsh6 With the rest oftheBritish population boasting titles.
1 person likes this
@thelme55 (9963)
• Germany
28 Jul 16
A very interesting information. Thanks for educating me as I am confused sometimes regarding the English titles of the monarchy.
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
28 Jul 16
These days it is less important but it can open doors for you!
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Jul 16
Although it's a bit complicated it certainly is interesting and you made it easier to understand
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
28 Jul 16
I hope it made it a little clearer as so many people get confused about it. Even here English people get it wrong!
@jstory07 (57760)
• Roseburg, Oregon
27 Jul 16
That says it all now I learned something new.
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
28 Jul 16
That's why I love this site so much we all learn from each other!
@LoriAMoore (12505)
• United States
27 Jul 16
Thanks for delineating this so well.
1 person likes this
@garymarsh6 (11913)
• United Kingdom
28 Jul 16
Thank you for reading. I hope you enjoyed it.
@epiffanie (8225)
• Australia
31 Jul 16
I enjoyed reading that.. I followed the Royals because of Princess Diana .. But she's gone now
1 person likes this
• Preston, England
30 Jul 16
Earless just sounds like a a woman without ears - Countess makes more sense gramatically
1 person likes this
@shshiju (8810)
• Cochin, India
28 Jul 16
I am unaware of these things, very informative thanks.
1 person likes this
@simone10 (22278)
• Louisville, Kentucky
28 Jul 16
Your post does clear up a lot for me but it is still a bit confusing. I find it really interesting and would love to learn more.
1 person likes this
• China
28 Jul 16
Thank you for sharing it with us!Now I get an idea of what a monarchic government is like,which is rigidly stratified.
1 person likes this