First stop on our trip - the Pinnacles

@JudyEv (137662)
Bunbury, Australia
August 17, 2016 8:46am CST
One of our first stops on our recent tour north of Perth, Western Australia, was to view the Pinnacles. These limestone formations are in the Nambung National Park near the township of Cervantes. The formations, some of which are very 'phallic' in nature, are composed of limestone from seashells from an earlier era when the area was part of the sea. In some photos you can see the Indian Ocean in the background. How the Pinnacles came to be formed is still the subject of debate. They range in size from a foot or two to over 9 feet tall. Until 1967 they were unknown to most Australians but now in excess of 150,000 tourists visit each year. Smaller vehicles can drive through the area following a designated path but our bus was too big so we rode in one of the smaller vehicles with our friends.
I created this video with the YouTube Slideshow Creator (http://www.youtube.com/upload)
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22 responses
@JohnRoberts (65377)
• Los Angeles, California
17 Aug 16
That's fascinating. All naturally formed and not man constructed like Stonehenge.
5 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
17 Aug 16
It can be quite eerie to come across something that seems so utterly out of place.
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@TheHorse (73732)
• Walnut Creek, California
31 Oct 16
That's what I figgered. I do want to go to Stonehenge before I'm dust.
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@Fleura (7373)
• United Kingdom
31 Oct 16
@TheHorse I think you'll be disappointed. It is undoubtedly impressive and fascinating but not as most people expect, although the stones are huge they are much closer together than you might think, and visitors cannot get that close to them but just have to follow everyone else (and there are lots of visitors) along a designated path like a conveyor belt. Recently, changes to the visitor site mean that you get a better idea of the setting of Stonehenge itself in the wider landscape, and how it was only one aspect of several large-scale features. There are other impressive sites too - my favourite is Avebury, where the huge standing stones are less shaped and further apart - they enclose an entire village. The guided tours are also very interesting.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (55198)
• United Kingdom
17 Aug 16
They are fascinating Judy, and there are so many of them, aren't there?
5 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
It's hard to give an idea of the scope of them but they do cover a huge area.
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@DianneN (88397)
• United States
18 Aug 16
Here's phallic for ya! We took this in Turkey.
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Aug 16
Heavens! Are the tops man-made? And are they houses or what?
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@DianneN (88397)
• United States
25 Aug 16
@JudyEv No, they are natural rock formations in the cave areas, but no one lives in those. We stayed in a cave hotel, which was lovely and fun. Here's another one.
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Aug 16
@DianneN Hopefully later in the year we are going to Coober Pedy where everyone lives underground - because of the intense heat. We will stay a night or two in an underground hotel which will be fun.
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@LadyDuck (183320)
• Switzerland
18 Aug 16
This is interesting. I think that they are made of fragile and soft materials and the wind, the rain and the sun have shaped them during the centuries.
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
Certainly they are still being eroded away and the tops fall off from time to time.
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@TheHorse (73732)
• Walnut Creek, California
31 Oct 16
I assume limestone is harder than the sandstone of Black Diamond Mines in California, where I take the kids hiking. But it's probably much softer than the granite of our bigger mountains (the High Sierra) further East.
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@LadyDuck (183320)
• Switzerland
31 Oct 16
@TheHorse The granite is surely stronger.
2 people like this
• United States
17 Aug 16
Is one of the theories that they were bigger but eroded after they were exposed? That would be my guess, wind and rain.
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
The theories are more to do with how they were formed. There are danger signs warning not to climb on the rocks as the tops are continually breaking off as they wear away.
2 people like this
• United States
18 Aug 16
@JudyEv Sure. That stuff is not stable and would fall apart if too much pressure is applied.
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@Tampa_girl7 (26830)
• United States
17 Aug 16
I've never seen them before. Thanks for the photograph.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
They're a bit different, aren't they?
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@Inlemay (17159)
• South Africa
18 Aug 16
wow - how stunning those look
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
They're pretty amazing aren't they?
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@Inlemay (17159)
• South Africa
18 Aug 16
@JudyEv rock formations always facinate me - I wonder what God was thinking when he designed them - (my thoughts)
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
@Inlemay I sometimes see things or hear things and say (most times to myself) 'the good Lord laughs again'. There was a Catholic priest from Indonesia who was made a cardinal and became 'Cardinal Sin'. I always think God had a bit of time on his hands and thought it time for a bit of amusement.
2 people like this
@Jessicalynnt (47879)
• Centralia, Missouri
17 Aug 16
how odd, just sticking up like that
2 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
It's strange to go round a corner and be confronted by all these shapes.
3 people like this
• Centralia, Missouri
18 Aug 16
@JudyEv they look as though they are an odd penile rock garden, sprouting up out of the earth
2 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Aug 16
@Jessicalynnt That's exactly right. Some are amazingly 'accurate'. :)
1 person likes this
• United States
18 Aug 16
wow! that's somethin', now aint 't? loved the shoe print'n the slide show :) what sorta plant's that peepin' out from the sand? most fascinatin' 'n now i've jest one more reason to visit australia, lol. such's stunnin' jest from the pics, can't imagine seein' such'n person.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Nov 16
I don't know what the plant is but it looks strong and sturdy doesn't it?
1 person likes this
• United States
2 Nov 16
@JudyEv 'ndeed such does :) shamefully i dunno what many'f the native plants 'round here're called neither - not 'officially' anyhow, jest the nicknames folks've given to 'em o'er the years.
1 person likes this
• China
18 Aug 16
It is a fine spectacle.This is the first time I know the Pinnacles.Here we have @stone-forest, a Karst topography,I have gone to there many year ago.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
Such places are very interesting aren't they?
2 people like this
@BelleStarr (39922)
• United States
17 Aug 16
What fascinating formations they are, I can't wait to go along with you on your travel.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
I'm pleased we've at last managed to see them. We've never managed to get very far north. You need to go when the weather is not too hot.
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@topffer (36476)
• Goa, India
17 Aug 16
They look like alignments of menhirs. I would not have thought that something like this could be done by mother Nature if you had not told us.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
There are various theories as to how they came about but they are certainly natural.
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@Daljinder (22196)
• India
17 Aug 16
How odd and interesting! Would love to see them in person. One of my friends is demanding (almost) that I visit Perth like yesterday (lol) She lives there.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
You should visit if you can. I'm sure you'd love it.
@Ronrybs (7938)
• London, England
17 Aug 16
Fascinating, love to see that
2 people like this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
17 Aug 16
I'm pleased we managed to see it at last.
1 person likes this
@velvet53 (17719)
• Palisade, Colorado
18 Aug 16
This is very interesting. I never heard of them.
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Aug 16
It's amazing that they weren't found until 1967.
3 people like this
@velvet53 (17719)
• Palisade, Colorado
19 Aug 16
@JudyEv I would love to be able to see them.
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@TheHorse (73732)
• Walnut Creek, California
31 Oct 16
@JudyEv Wow--1967! Did the natives know about them?
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@inertia4 (27784)
• United States
17 Aug 16
Checked out the video. Cool pictures. That is quite amazing. Just to think that was under water at some point in time. Makes you wonder what the floor of the sea looks like. Maybe a lot like that.
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
17 Aug 16
I guess the soft stuff has washed away over time. It does make for a strange looking landscape.
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@inertia4 (27784)
• United States
17 Aug 16
@JudyEv That it does but it looks so awesome. It is amazing how this planet really is.
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@Fleura (7373)
• United Kingdom
31 Oct 16
What an interesting place, geology is fascinating!
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Nov 16
It's never appealed much to me before but I can see how people would get hooked.
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@TheHorse (73732)
• Walnut Creek, California
31 Oct 16
they remind me of the faces at..where is it...Easter Island?
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Nov 16
Yes, Easter Island. We haven't been there but I'd love to go. There is easily as much buried below the surface as above apparently. No-one knows how they got there. But the faces have been carved whereas the Pinnacles are just natural formations.
@sueznewz2 (10160)
• Alicante, Spain
21 Aug 16
wow ... what a great place to be able to walk round ... fascinating.... I really enjoyed the slideshow too...
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
22 Aug 16
I'm glad you enjoyed it. It was strange to suddenly come upon it.
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@Corbin5 (119895)
• United States
17 Aug 16
Quite a sight to see!! Would be interesting to know how the formations were created.
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@JudyEv (137662)
• Bunbury, Australia
18 Aug 16
There are various theories but no-one knows for sure how they came about.
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