In this day and age protecting our brains is very important

A few years back I was still using 35mm film and got this shot of an ant on a sunflower stalk.
@rebelann (28241)
El Paso, Texas
September 6, 2016 8:39am CST
I've noticed there are many mylotters dealing with a parents dementia problems and after what my mom went through I am researching the possibility to prevent myself from getting it, the last thing I'd want is to become a burden on society and since I don't have kids I'd be at the mercy of a nursing home or worse my nephews so keeping my brain healthy is important to me. I've added a link to an article I'm in the process of trying to totally comprehend and I hope it will help those of you who are dealing with parents who have dementia now. http://www.helpguide.org/articles/alzheimers-dementia/alzheimers-and-dementia-prevention.htm
12 people like this
10 responses
@LadyDuck (109316)
• Switzerland
6 Sep 16
I fear that dementia is in our genes and there is nothing that can stop the process. Just like Jabo, I had a very kind aunt that was very active and she did everything she could to keep her mind and brain active, but she finally was unable to stop dementia.
3 people like this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
6 Sep 16
I have to wonder if maybe scientists don't really know the difference between Alzheimers and dementia, I once read that Alzheimers is can be hereditary whereas dementia is not, but scientists seem to get things wrong sometimes don't they?
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (109316)
• Switzerland
7 Sep 16
@rebelann Yes, there is proof that is associated with mutations in genes and that there is a genetic risk factor to develop the disease. This does not mean that everybody who has someone in the family with the disease will be affected, but there is a risk. There is no difference between Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Alzheimer's is the terminal stage of dementia.
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@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
7 Sep 16
That's what confuses me @LadyDuck when I took care of mom she had ventricular dementia and according to the cardiovascular doctor it was not the same as Alzheimer's, he told me Alzheimer's would destroy brain cells whereas dementia would not and as long as mom got enough blood to her brain she would go in and out of cognition. She passed away last year at 99 but because she couldn't hear us we have no way of knowing if she understood anything. She did smile at me when I would sing to her but I have no clue if she could hear me.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (48829)
• United Kingdom
6 Sep 16
I don't know if dementia is preventable. I had a very brain-active friend and she did all the things that are recommended , but still got it.
3 people like this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
6 Sep 16
Yes, I know a few people whose parents got Alzheimers and in those cases they were told nothing could be done to stop the disease but when mom was diagnosed with Ventricular Dementia I was told that had she been younger (she was 93) they could have put stents in the carotid artery and remove the plaque that was causing her dementia. I honestly believe that there must be at least a hundred different causes for dementia and that some of those causes can be cured and will help a person avoid dementia.
2 people like this
@jaboUK (48829)
• United Kingdom
6 Sep 16
@rebelann I really hope that they will be able to cure some forms of dementia - it seems like more and more people are getting it.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
6 Sep 16
I just read that more people are getting it simply because more people are living longer @jaboUK but they did seem to think .... I am stressing think here cuz they never seem to agree with themselves 20 years later .... that it mostly affects people over the age of 80.
2 people like this
@Corbin5 (70555)
• United States
6 Sep 16
Both my parents had, and now have, dementia. Quite a struggle. Thanks for the link. Will take a look. My dad's dementia was exacerbated by hearing loss. Do not know about what Mom did or didn't do to have dementia come her way.
2 people like this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
6 Sep 16
So sorry both your parents suffered from it. I read somewhere that hearing loss only makes the dementia worse or can even lead to it, I think that may have made my mom's that much worse.
2 people like this
@Corbin5 (70555)
• United States
6 Sep 16
@rebelann Yes, signals from sound not being heard cause certain parts of the brain to sort of stop working. Mom was an avid reader, in good health, and had friends, so I have no idea why she succumbed to dementia.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
6 Sep 16
It would seem there are a multitude of reasons why we contract dementia @Corbin5 being hard of hearing is just one of them. Mom was hard of hearing but refused to use a hearing aid so her dementia simply got worse.
1 person likes this
@1hopefulman (17608)
• Canada
6 Sep 16
I wonder if there is really anything we can do to keep our brain healthy? I would think that good nutrition (fruits, nuts, vegetables, greens), some form of daily exercise or activity, and mental activity (reading, conversations, curiosity) would help.
2 people like this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
6 Sep 16
I've read that a healthy diet must include vitamin B12 to maintain good brain health.
1 person likes this
@1hopefulman (17608)
• Canada
7 Sep 16
@rebelann What do you do for B12?
1 person likes this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
7 Sep 16
Meats, fish, eggs etc @1hopefulman you can't get it from any form of veggie.
1 person likes this
@marsha32 (6794)
• United States
6 Sep 16
They had us get puzzle books for hubby's mother, but she was already gone by then. I would like to think that with everything I do that my brain is staying active and healthy, but others may be right that if you are going to get it, you are going to get it.
2 people like this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
6 Sep 16
I wonder about that. One article I read back in 2010 suggested that Alzheimers is hereditary but dementia is not and that some forms of dementia can be reversed such as the type brought on by hearing loss.
@DianneN (53094)
• United States
8 Sep 16
I have read so many preventative remedies. I don't know if they work or not.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
8 Sep 16
I think including meat, fish, eggs and cheese can be very helpful. So how is everything going for you my friend?
1 person likes this
@DianneN (53094)
• United States
10 Sep 16
@rebelann Proteins could help. I also heard taking organic coconut oil every day is beneficial. The doctor is positive that my husband will regain the use of his arms in 4-6 weeks. I feel so relieved! His pain is what we're dealing with. I'm so exhausted that my eyes burn.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
10 Sep 16
I know from past research that B12 is essential for the healing process @DianneN I stepped up my intake after my surgery and I believe it actually did help ..... I started eating more eggs, fish and chicken, I don't believe in supplements.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Sep 16
i'd a dear friend who lost her hubs to alzheimers...'t the age 'f 54. the doc's didn't believe her fer years (he'd signs 'f such fer 'bout 8 years 'fore he t'was properly diagnosed). i dunno if'n there's a way to prevent such? but i sure hope they find cures soon.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
7 Sep 16
I've read that Alzheimers is a disease of the brain where the brain cells are slowly destroyed. Ma's cardiovascular doc told me she had ventricular dementia which could have been cured if she'd been young enough for them to put stents in her carotid arteries. Turns out that if she got enough blood flow to her brain she'd be cognitive but as she got older that just didn't happen much. He also told me that her hearing problem was makin the whole thing worse
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Sep 16
@rebelann that's most interestin' 'n quite sad 's well.
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@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
7 Sep 16
If ma had been in her 80s she could have gotten those stents which would have enhanced the blood flow to her brain @crazyhorseladycx well, all isn't that bad really, she lived to be 99.
1 person likes this
@HazySue (15184)
• United States
8 Sep 16
@rebelann myn father had Alzheimers as did my grandmother, two of his sisters and three of his brothers. It is so important to keep the mind going. Puzzles are one way of doing so. The article you have suggested is excellent.
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@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
8 Sep 16
I haven't heard anything about preventing Alzheimer's but they have written about preventing other forms of dementia. I'm glad that link was helpful.
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@responsiveme (12642)
• India
7 Sep 16
Very very true...thanks for the link
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@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
7 Sep 16
You are very welcome
1 person likes this
• Amritsar, India
6 Sep 16
That is true. We often neglect our brain health and focus on heart problems and more without realising that it is the brain that controls all the organs.. Keep it healthy, as a result everything will be fine.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (28241)
• El Paso, Texas
6 Sep 16
That's partly true. We can’t rely on the brain to prevent cancer but keeping it healthy means we are more able to keep the rest of our bodies healthy as well or at least be aware if something goes wrong so we get the proper care.
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