THE DOYEN OF modern English ballads; Engelbert Humperdinck

Sri Lanka
November 18, 2016 5:43am CST
Undoubtedly I strongly believe that THE DOYEN OF modern English ballads is non other than Engelbert Humperdinck who sings most of the lovely ballads that are much popular in the world. I was recently heavily impressed by a very few of his masterpieces like Blue Spanish Eye, Tell me when will you be mine etc. Are you a fan of him? Please make suggestions of a few another from the host of his masterworks if you know any. (Edited according to the comments. thanks for them)
1 person likes this
2 responses
@owlwings (39258)
• Cambridge, England
18 Nov 16
Englebert Humperdinck, the singer, could hardly be called a 'doyen of Classical music'. He is a 'pop singer' and, while he has been called "one of the finest middle-of-the-road balladeers around.", he has little or nothing to do with Classical music. He is said to have referred to himself as "a contemporary singer, a stylised performer". "Englebert Humperdinck" is the stage name of Arnold George Dorsey. The real Englebert Humperdinck was a minor German composer best known for his opera, "Hansel and Grethel". If anyone could be called "the doyen of English Classical music", it would be Ralph Vaughan Williams, Edward Elgar or Benjamin Britten.
1 person likes this
• Sri Lanka
18 Nov 16
i just love his songs very much urging me to use the best words. that's all. if you think by using the word doyen for him I've done something unsuitable and unfair for the other singers i'd love to edit this. pls let me know how should i do this because you know about him better than me. thanks for showing me the errors.
@owlwings (39258)
• Cambridge, England
18 Nov 16
@kevinakash You may call him a 'doyen', if you wish (though I'd have to disagree). It means "the most respected or prominent person in a particular field." The term "Classical music" is defined as "serious music following long-established principles rather than a folk, jazz, or popular tradition." so it is not really a suitable epithet for Engelbert Humperdinck's songs, which are in the tradition of modern popular ballads.
1 person likes this
• Sri Lanka
19 Nov 16
@owlwings thanks dear
1 person likes this
@Asylum (48281)
• Manchester, England
18 Nov 16
When I saw that you had used the word 'Classical' I was expecting this to be about the real Engelbert Humperdinck.
1 person likes this
• Sri Lanka
18 Nov 16
by reading these comments i think i have used wrong language here. so do you think i should remove the word "Classical"? wt else should i do to edit this? it's extremely sryy if i have done something wrong. thanks for showing me the errors.
1 person likes this
@Asylum (48281)
• Manchester, England
18 Nov 16
@kevinakash Classical does seem an inappropriate word in this case because Classical Music is a term reserved for the realms of composers such as Puccini or Tchaikovsky. This is not a major issue, but does give the wrong impression.
1 person likes this
• Sri Lanka
19 Nov 16
@Asylum okay thanks
1 person likes this