Review: Science Fiction Short Story: "The Man Who Saw the Future" by Edmond Hamilton

@msiduri (5757)
United States
January 6, 2017 8:21am CST
Jean de Marselait, Inquisitor Extraordinary of the King of France listens to the charges against Henri Luthier, an apothecary’s assistant in Paris. There are witnesses who testify how Henri, in this year of our Lord one thousand four hundred and forty-four, offended God and king by committing the crime of sorcery. Henri asks to be heard. He denies being a sorcerer. Like the rest of the town, he explains, he’d heard the thunderclaps on a clear day in the field. Unlike everyone else, he was curious and went into the field to see if he could understand them. Something he couldn’t see seized him. He could not fight it. He became dizzy then found himself in a white room with a floor like stone. Machines he couldn’t comprehend filled the room. The men there spoke a type of French he could understand only if they spoke slowly. They told him it was not 1444, but 1944. This is an interesting, if sad, little story. Ultimately hopeful, perhaps, it is not without destruction and a long night in outlook. Author Edmond Hamilton was a prolific pulp writer, writing stories early for such publications and Weird Tales and many other periodicals. Notable works include Captain Future stories and various space opera works. Hamilton also worked in comic books, specifically with D.C. Comics on Batman and Superman. In 1946, he and fellow science fiction writer Leigh Brackett (1915-1978) married. Brackett was also a screen writer, whose works included The Big Sleep, Rio Bravo, The Long Goodbye and The Empire Strikes Back. This story is available from Project Gutenberg and as an audiobook from Librivox: ____ Title: “The Man Who Saw the Future” Author: Edmond Hamilton (1904-1977) First published: Amazing Stories October 1930 Source: ISFDB *An earlier version of the review appeared on another site that has since disappeared into the void. It has been updated and expanded for it inclusion on myLot.*
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/28062
4 people like this
3 responses
@JohnRoberts (51983)
• Los Angeles, California
6 Jan 17
I always have to laugh at accusations of sorcery and being a witch. If they were really that, then should not the accusers be terrified of those powers being wielded upon them?
2 people like this
@msiduri (5757)
• United States
6 Jan 17
The trials take place in a holy place where witch have no power or in front of a holy person before whom witches have no power. Catch-22 before Joseph Heller wrote the book.
1 person likes this
@teamfreak16 (40499)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
6 Jan 17
I had to read this twice, because the "She's a witch" scene popped into my head. This really does sound cool.
1 person likes this
@msiduri (5757)
• United States
6 Jan 17
"Well, I got better."
1 person likes this
@WriterAI (5017)
• Bulgaria
6 Jan 17
Interesting reading.
1 person likes this