Are your horizons horizontal? I'll be watching

@JudyEv (140669)
Bunbury, Australia
January 10, 2017 4:07am CST
Anyone who follows me here will know I am not averse to 'borrowing' my husband's photos whenever I need a really good one. He loves his photography and has become quite pedantic about some aspects of his photography. I put up with this because, after all, he does cook almost all the meals so I'm not about to bite the hand that feeds me. One of his pet hates is horizons that slope off to the left or right. Once, I would never have noticed such things but now I carefully peer at all horizons to see if they are horizontal or not. And I check when I take a photo to have the horizon level. He has completely spoilt my enjoyment of landscapes. Now I have to go looking for a less-than-perfect landscape to display here. I bet it will be one of my own. And it is. This photo seems nondescript but I took it because the pole supports a light which comes on if there is the risk of a frost. The warmth from it is enough to save the vegetables from frost-bite. I think that is pretty cool - or warm - or whatever.
21 people like this
24 responses
@owlwings (39996)
• Cambridge, England
10 Jan 17
Your image rotated & cropped
I also abhor horizons which aren't level, especially, of course where it's very obvious such as a seascape. Fortunately, there are several things you can do to make sure it doesn't happen too often. The first (and best) is to look at the settings available for your viewfinder. Some cameras offer a grid overlay which divides the frame into thirds both horizontally and vertically. This is useful both because one of the basic rules for good composition is to position important features of the shot on one of these points (it is, of course, a rule which can be broken but its a good guide) and because one can position the horizon on either the upper or the lower third (again, in accordance with the rule). The second fix is to use a photo-editing software to rotate the image so that the horizon is level. You will, of course, have to crop the frame somewhat, which means losing some of the image. Here is your photo rotated clockwise by about 5 degrees and cropped to give a rectangular frame.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
Thanks for the info. Vince fixes horizons if I ask him and I should learn to do it myself. I'm a tad lazy sometimes. But I do find that whenever I take a photo now I mostly check to see if the horizon is level. It is amazing what you can do to photos now isn't it?
1 person likes this
@owlwings (39996)
• Cambridge, England
10 Jan 17
@JudyEv I used IrfanView which is a free and fairly simple tool. You want one which has a 'Custom Rotation' option (most can rotate images by 90 degrees but not all have custom rotation). I usually estimate the angle it needs to be rotated (it's not hard to guess in 5 degree increments) and then adjust by a degree or so if it needs it. I can usually get it as close as I need in two or three goes. I didn't time myself but I suppose that downloading your photo, opening it in IrfanView, adjusting the angle of rotation (two goes), cropping the image to eliminate the original borders, saving and uploading to my response here took less than 5 minutes. Other editors I use (both completely free) are Paint.net and Gimp. Paint.net can do rather more than IrfanView, including layers and better colour adjustment and some useful effects, but is still simple and quick to use. Gimp is more complex and up to the standard of Photoshop. It can do complex things like correct converging verticals (when the camera is pointed upwards to include the top of a building, for example).
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
@owlwings Thanks for the extra information. I have tried to do a few things with Paint and Vince has Photoshop and some other fancy program. One allows him to take, say, three photos which can then be merged to create a panoramic view. It is quite incredible what these various programs can do.
1 person likes this
@Jessicalynnt (47879)
• Centralia, Missouri
10 Jan 17
I dont always like things to be balanced, more interesting sometimes when they are not
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
I might adopt that as my excuse. :)
1 person likes this
• Centralia, Missouri
12 Jan 17
@JudyEv hehehe, I would start intentionally taking out of balance and interesting photos
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
13 Jan 17
@Jessicalynnt And I will be careful not to comment on their out-of-balancenessness and interest.
1 person likes this
• Greece
10 Jan 17
If you want to continue to share his photos with the world (us at least) then it might be a good idea and only show the ones he approves of, - he has an image to preserve!
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
He does indeed. I try not to let him see some of the photos I put up here. Personally sometimes I think he is just too fussy!
1 person likes this
• Greece
10 Jan 17
@JudyEv that is the downside of a perfectionist!
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
@41CombedaleRoad It gets a bit wearing sometimes doesn't it? I think your husband likes things done well too, doesn't he?
@xFiacre (6032)
• Ireland
10 Jan 17
@judyev The world is crooked in many respects so why shouldn't the horizon be a bit wonky too?
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
Good thought. I'm making notes of all the 'comebacks' I'll be able to use next time he gets too critical.
2 people like this
• Philippines
13 Jan 17
@JudyEv so true! mylotters can come up with witty one-liners!
@JohnRoberts (66773)
• Los Angeles, California
10 Jan 17
They used to use smudge pots during frost to save fruit trees.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
I haven't heard of smudge pots. Do they involve heat in some way?
1 person likes this
@JohnRoberts (66773)
• Los Angeles, California
11 Jan 17
@JudyEv You light smudge pots which send out heat.
2 people like this
• United States
10 Jan 17
The world isn't flat, so horizons won't be either.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
As long as trees and lamp posts are standing up straight all is well. :)
1 person likes this
• Philippines
13 Jan 17
@JudyEv good point! what matters is it's not sideways and we learned about the unique lamp
@simone10 (21646)
• Louisville, Kentucky
10 Jan 17
I never would have noticed if you hadn't mentioned it. I think most of mine aren't perfect either as I really don't think about it. Now I will
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
That's exactly the problem. I never saw it or worried about it until Vince pointed it out. I'ts not fair!
2 people like this
@simone10 (21646)
• Louisville, Kentucky
11 Jan 17
@JudyEv No, it's not. Now it will be on both of our minds when we take pictures.
@toniganzon (53557)
• Philippines
10 Jan 17
Driving shots usually produce that kind of effect.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
That's true and this one was taken out the car window. I feel better now.
1 person likes this
@toniganzon (53557)
• Philippines
10 Jan 17
@JudyEv yeah, i guessed it.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Jan 17
You are talking about sloping horizons in the form of the photograph itself, right? You aren't talking about imperfect nature and the desire for it to be all straight lines? I don't think your husband would like any of my photographs then, as I have a tendency to slant my measly camera phone to the side. I suppose I find it "artsy", though others might think I was a bit tottered.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
Yes, I'm talking about sloping horizons. Mostly I manage to get them straight nowadays although my natural inclination seems to be to slant slightly to one side too. And once I wouldn't have really noticed if they weren't straight but now I do.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Jan 17
@JudyEv I think the picture is beautiful either way myself.
1 person likes this
@Plethos (12000)
• United States
10 Jan 17
Tell him you liked the "Dutch angle" approach ,
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
Thanks. I'll do that. I have a little list of 'excuses' or 'reasons' now so I'm set.
2 people like this
@teamfreak16 (42401)
• Denver, Colorado
10 Jan 17
I wouldn't even have noticed it!
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
I have got worse ones but I couldn't find them. Once, I wouldn't have noticed it either. Vince is always spoiling things for me! Now I get paranoid about my horizons!
1 person likes this
@shaggin (39437)
• United States
10 Jan 17
I looked at this photo and thought it was beautiful until you spoiled it for me and I noticed it how it sloped to the right I have never heard of the frost light that sounds very important for farners.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
Haha. That's what Vince did - spoilt it for me and now I'm paranoid about it. :)
2 people like this
@Madshadi (9031)
• Brussels, Belgium
10 Jan 17
I never pay attention to the landscape when I take a picture. I only focus on the object which i want to capture. But I am not a professional photographer.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
I guess it depends a lot on the photo. As long as trees are standing straight up all is well. :)
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (187235)
• Switzerland
10 Jan 17
Judy my husband used to criticize my landscape because my horizons were not "horizontal". I have learned to correct this problem now.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
I'm glad someone else has this problem. I had to find a photo of some months ago to find a horizon that was 'out of whack' so that means I must be improving. Husbands are a pain sometimes aren't they? :)
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (187235)
• Switzerland
10 Jan 17
@JudyEv Yes Judy, sometimes they are a pain, they are lucky that we love them.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
@LadyDuck Indeed they are. Vince told me yesterday I was the laziest wife he'd ever had because I wouldn't get up and get him something that was nearer to him anyway!
2 people like this
@just4him (131899)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
11 Jan 17
He would be appalled at my photos then as mine are generally not horizontal no matter how I try, they are often tilted just a bit. However, when it comes to the pictures in my home, they need to be straight or I go nuts if they are even a fraction tilted.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
I don't think he would be appalled but now he has mentioned it a few times it really hits me in the eye if mine aren't straight.
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@just4him (131899)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
11 Jan 17
@JudyEv I think my head is tilted which is why my pictures are. I had an eye doctor once who told me I needed to have special correction in my eyes because the horizontal was off. They put some kind of prism in my glasses so I wasn't hanging my head almost on my shoulder so I was seeing straight. I no longer have prism in my glasses, but I think my head must still be tilted a little bit.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
@just4him When I take a photo now I'll the camera 'straight' to my way of thinking but when I check the horizon it tilts off to one side.
1 person likes this
@Asylum (48215)
• Manchester, England
10 Jan 17
I would agree with you if the photograph was taken undeveloped, but surely there must be some horizons that do slope. Levelling those out would simply create a false image.
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@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
That's very true but IF they should be horizontal and they aren't - then it can look strange.
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@Asylum (48215)
• Manchester, England
10 Jan 17
@JudyEv Yes, but it is simple to rotate the photograph and align it.
1 person likes this
@owlwings (39996)
• Cambridge, England
10 Jan 17
@Asylum The true horizon is always level but is rarely seen in photos (except seascapes, &c). Often the only guide you have is the vertical/horizontal nature of buildings, lamp posts, telegraph poles or even trees, if any. Sometimes it just 'feels' wrong and a little rotation can correct it.
2 people like this
@stbrians (15896)
• Kakamega, Kenya
10 Jan 17
Now you mention, I had to go back to the photo to get it. Amazing and your husband a genius
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
This is my photo and the horizon is not horizontal so Vince would be telling me to be more careful. :)
1 person likes this
@stbrians (15896)
• Kakamega, Kenya
10 Jan 17
@JudyEv He is a genius I tell you. To me it looks horizontal. Poor me, am the opposite of Vince
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@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Jan 17
@stbrians If you compare @owlwings photo with mine you can see the improvement.
@sueznewz2 (10157)
• Alicante, Spain
19 Jan 17
Some of my photos suffer from this, but just recently I have been taking more time, and checking framing, horizon and background...., but when I forgot...which I often do, being excited....there is always maggs224 ready to help me out with. ..photoshop editing programe ...yeeeyyyy
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
20 Jan 17
It's great to have your own personal photo editor isn't it?
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@sueznewz2 (10157)
• Alicante, Spain
20 Jan 17
@JudyEv yeahhh..lol
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
11 Jan 17
I never heard of such a light, but it sounds like a great idea. I will have watch my horizons on my off the cuff photos now.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
I can just see all the myLotters taking photos with nice level horizons!
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• Eugene, Oregon
11 Jan 17
@JudyEv A likely outcome no doubt.
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@allknowing (72645)
• India
11 Jan 17
is there a thing like a photograph not having horizontal horizons. Must go check. I have work to do
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@JudyEv (140669)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Jan 17
Not all horizons are level but sometimes we tip the camera a bit when we take a photo. That's what I used to do but not so often now.
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@allknowing (72645)
• India
11 Jan 17
@JudyEv There is never a situation where we can say we know everything. Learning is a continuous process and I see it even here. Thanks. .
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