No Need for Bees – We Have Drones! (Robotic Bees)

robotic bees
Austin, Texas
February 18, 2017 1:03pm CST
I try to keep abreast of scientific and technological advances. It's interesting and it's good there are brilliant minds out there because science was never my favorite subject in school. For years I have been hearing about the plight of the bumble bee and how once again mankind screwed up the ecological system by destroying them. It's a good thing God made us “somewhat” intelligent. He must have known we were going to mess up the perfect world He had given us, so He gave us some sort of intellect to work on fixing the stuff we screw up! “Eijiro Miyako at Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, and his colleagues have used the principle of cross-pollination in bees to make a drone that transports pollen between flowers.”
With bee populations tumbling, an autonomous drone just 4 centimetres wide could help pollinate crops by flying from flower to flower
5 people like this
6 responses
@JolietJake (51144)
• United States
18 Feb 17
It isn't bumble bees it is honey bees. And saying we wouldn't need them is slightly wrong...we are talking billions of bees.
1 person likes this
• Austin, Texas
18 Feb 17
OK. Thanks for the correction. I always assumed all bees made honey. Got the idea from the bumble bee on the tuna can! Why is there a bumble bee on a can tuna anyway? Who said we wouldn't need them? Was that in the article? I don't remember reading that.
1 person likes this
@JolietJake (51144)
• United States
18 Feb 17
@cmoneyspinner I am referring to your title...you said it
• United States
28 Feb 17
I am a tech fan and I enjoyed this article. Thanks for sharing. I think within time, the bees will be saved from extinction..At least that's my prayer.
• Austin, Texas
28 Feb 17
Fortunately, these days we have a legion of environmentalists who kick up a fuss. Lots of people find them annoying (especially people who only count dollars and cents when deciding on business projects instead of considering other impacts). But I'm glad they do their jobs!
@DWDavis (10771)
• Pikeville, North Carolina
18 Feb 17
I think this is a great advance, but can they make honey?
1 person likes this
• Austin, Texas
18 Feb 17
Nope! It only fixes part of the problem.
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (106632)
• United States
18 Feb 17
Now, that is one brilliant idea, but could be a costly one.
1 person likes this
• Austin, Texas
18 Feb 17
Lack of pollination is probably more costly. I don't know. Just guessing.
1 person likes this
• Richfield, Utah
18 Feb 17
That would be interesting, robot bees without the sting...
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123432)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Feb 17
That is pretty amazing. I know bees are supposed to be in a bad way.