Talents.

@xFiacre (10505)
Ireland
February 27, 2017 9:28am CST
@judyev wrote earlier about talents - are some more important than others? As I was considering her thoughts the blurb on the back of a book I'm reading caught my eye and I've never seen such fanciful words used to extol the virtues of a writer's talent: "Leonardo Sciascia is so infuriatingly good that you wonder whether his Protean talents are not those of a secret syndicate". Wow, just wow.
7 people like this
5 responses
@MALUSE (32920)
• Denmark
27 Feb
I read some Sciascia stories many years ago. I don't remember them clearly. Only that they impressed me positively. I wonder how many speakers of English know the word 'Protean'.
3 people like this
@xFiacre (10505)
• Ireland
27 Feb
@maluse I suspect that a very few people would ever have come across that word. And very few English speakers would have read Sciascia I suspect, though I recently read the short work he wrote on all that happened to Aldo Moro.
@pgntwo (21746)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
27 Feb
@MALUSE Protean describes the weather here... changeable in the extreme.
@JudyEv (101135)
• Bunbury, Australia
27 Feb
I didn't.
• Wilmslow, England
27 Feb
I think all talents are equally as good and thumbs up for those who learn such talents. I do believe though that some talents might seem more important or better because they are more intriguing, interesting and make you want to see more. When programmes like britains got talent show people who have talents that are laughed at I don't think that is right. No matter what they have shown they have spent lots of time learning what they do and to be laughed at is so sad.
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@shaggin (26951)
• United States
27 Feb
That does sound like high praise but I do not know what Protean is I will have to go look that up.
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@JudyEv (101135)
• Bunbury, Australia
27 Feb
I had to look it up too. :)
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@shaggin (26951)
• United States
27 Feb
@JudyEv The post made more sense once I looked it up. Happens a lot here for me.
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• Wilmslow, England
28 Feb
@JudyEv as did I
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (122322)
• Switzerland
27 Feb
Leonardo Sciascia a true Sicilian, he was member of the Italian Chamber in the late 70's early 80's. I have just bought "The Mystery of Majorana" right now. Sciascia works tried to show how corrupt Italian society had become.
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@JudyEv (101135)
• Bunbury, Australia
27 Feb
Wow indeed. And do you agree with the blurb - or is it too soon to tell?
@xFiacre (10505)
• Ireland
27 Feb
@judyev He is rather good, but is a bit of an acquired taste. I do like Italian writers - Manzoni, Fo, Silone, Camelleri, Pavese, etc.
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@pgntwo (21746)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
27 Feb
@xFiacre Camilleri I think is Sicilian by descent, if it's the one I am thinking of. Or perhaps not, Inspector Montalbano would disagree.
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@xFiacre (10505)
• Ireland
28 Feb
@pgntwo From the town of Agrigento if I'm right, and I do look forward to acquainting myself with the little places the redoubtable Inspector has made famous when I presence myself in Sicily next month. I also hope to sample the pasta with a squid ink sauce that he is so fond of.
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