"Top 'O' the morning to ya..." is British.

United States
March 17, 2017 6:22pm CST
Or perhaps it is? I don't know when I first started hearing "Top "O" The Morning To Ya?" It probably had something to do with that leprechaun on the red box of cereal. Yea, Lucky Charms. Regardless, it's been somehow associated with Ireland since.. as long as I can remember.. But it's not really Irish...There's evidence that an Irish author coined the phrase, and later a British poet. It might have been "spoken" in the Victorian Era but I'd highly doubt it. I only say it might have been because the aforementioned Irish Author apparently lived in that time period. It's more likely that, somebody picked up a copy of a book that had the phrase written in, and decided to popularize it. It only takes one person after all..
Few dialect myths rankle more people than the purported Irish phrase, “top o’ the morning.”  Any Irish person will inform you that they have never, ever heard even one of their co…
11 people like this
10 responses
@Deepizzaguy (10465)
• Lake Charles, Louisiana
17 Mar 17
That is very true. One of my favorite saying is "You are nuttier than a squirrel."
3 people like this
• United States
18 Mar 17
That's a phrase I"ve heard, but not often here.
1 person likes this
@snowy22315 (42027)
• United States
17 Mar 17
Yeah, an Irish friend told me it wasn't Irish. He said it came from the Heat of the Night with Rod Steiger. So maybe he was wrong..but yeah, not really said in Ireland.
2 people like this
• United States
18 Mar 17
Wait... the television show with Carrol O'Connor? I don't remember that... but meh.
@snowy22315 (42027)
• United States
18 Mar 17
@ScribbledAdNauseum was a movie prior to that
1 person likes this
• United States
18 Mar 17
@snowy22315 Hmm. I don't remember the movie. I remember the t.v. show though. My sister and I did a ridiculous dance act (to it) when we were younger. Probably the only bonding experience we had.
@much2say (38152)
• United States
17 Mar 17
I had to chuckle because the kids just had some Lucky Charms . I never thought about that - but I probably associate that greeting with Lucky Charms too . . . which then of course we associate with that "Irish" leprechaun. But the term is not Irish at all? There must be so many terms we have so wrong in our language - for whatever reason we just make these assumptions.
2 people like this
• United States
18 Mar 17
I am sure you are right. THere are probably so many that we associate wrongly.
@shaggin (35594)
• United States
17 Mar 17
That is pretty interesting. Have you had the St. Patrick's day lucky charms?
1 person likes this
• United States
18 Mar 17
Nope. Haven't had any Lucky Charms in a very long time.
1 person likes this
@shaggin (35594)
• United States
19 Mar 17
@ScribbledAdNauseum I was going to make a saint patricks day treat for my kids but ran out of time. My daughters been earing them the past few nights for a bedtime snack.
1 person likes this
@franxav (4508)
17 Mar 17
Thanks, I love to know of those old phrases. They are not just group of words. They tell stories.
1 person likes this
• United States
18 Mar 17
I couldn't have said it better myself. You're right, they tell stories.
@NJChicaa (35696)
• United States
17 Mar 17
Thanks for sharing! I never knew that!
1 person likes this
• United States
18 Mar 17
I hadn't either. It also never crossed my mind to look until someone else said it wasn't Irish.
1 person likes this
@Brittnyrose (1457)
• Aberdeen, North Carolina
18 Mar 17
Nice, I've learned something today. Hehehehe!!
1 person likes this
@jstory07 (63983)
• Roseburg, Oregon
18 Mar 17
I think it is because one person said it and than it was popular to say.
1 person likes this
@Courtlynn (64929)
• United States
18 Mar 17
I think the first time i ever heard that saying is from the disney movie luck of the irish. But who knows. Couldve been somewhere else way before that movie came out. I didnt know that though about the saying.
• United States
18 Mar 17
I've never heard of that movie. I wonder where they (the disney movie) got it from?
@Courtlynn (64929)
• United States
18 Mar 17
1 person likes this
18 Mar 17
It may not be Irish, but it's definitely not British, either! I can't even imagine it being said in ANY British accent!
• United States
18 Mar 17
No, I couldn't imagine that either. I'm not saying it's "british" as in people use it all the time... Only that (according that website) a British poet was the first one to use it.