My pumpkins are ripe for picking

@JudyEv (100470)
Bunbury, Australia
May 1, 2017 5:43am CST
Way back when, I posted about my pumpkin plants. The butternut pumpkins (squashes) didn't do so well this year but we've had some nice pumpkin soup. Several of the plants turned out to be more 'regular' type pumpkins and I picked the first one today. It weighs in at 3.3 kgs (7.27 pounds). I'm looking forward to plenty of baked pumpkin with our next roast. Maybe I could even get motivated and make some pumpkin scones. What do you think?
37 people like this
47 responses
@JolietJake (41139)
1 May
" What do you think?" I think I keep forgetting the bottom half of the world is heading for winter.
6 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
So is this a squash or a pumpkin to you?
1 person likes this
@JolietJake (41139)
1 May
@JudyEv Silly woman, it's a pumpkin squash 'Pumpkin' here typically refers to orange coloration, I believe.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
@JolietJake I think you're just hedging your bets. So what's a butternut? A butternut squash? We have Japanese pumpkins here too. Reading up Wiki, my photo looks a bit like a Jap pumpkin. It's all too confusing.
2 people like this
@louievill (16346)
• Philippines
1 May
I put grated squash and mung bean sprouts in a Filipino dish called " ukoy" or shrimp fritters to make it healthier and taste better. Looks like you have a lot to experiment cooking with.
5 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
I will be keen to use it all somehow. I don't like wasting food.
3 people like this
@louievill (16346)
• Philippines
1 May
@JudyEv me too, I sort of pity the ones that won't get eaten especially if I planted it myself
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
@louievill Any we don't eat will be given away.
2 people like this
@Morleyhunt (16548)
• Canada
1 May
That's a nice looking squash....when I read the title and saw the photo.....my first thought! That's not a pumpkin! These differences in terminology will get you every time.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
I thought this was a pumpkin! I know the butternuts aren't, not to you folks anyway, but I thought this was. Why is this a squash and not a pumpkin? I'm finding it hard to get my head around these terms.
@Morleyhunt (16548)
• Canada
1 May
@JudyEv to a us a pumpkin is a squash, but a squash is not a pumpkin. That also doesn't look like the squash I know as a butternut squash. Let me find a photo and add it. I'll be back!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
@Morleyhunt I'd call this butternut pumpkin and that's what I usually grow. I know you call it a squash. Does that mean you'd call my photo by either name? It's all too confusing!
@marlina (62079)
• Canada
1 May
It sounds strange to read about pumpkins being ready to eat. We are still in our early Spring here and I don't think that any pumpkin seeds are in the ground yet.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
It will soon be too wet here for pumpkins but there are paddocks full of them waiting to be picked in this area. There are a lot of vegetables grown around here.
1 person likes this
@Shavkat (46634)
• Philippines
1 May
That's a good harvest. If my mom will see this, she will be jealous.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
Do you grow them there? They need temperatures over 22C to ripen so that shouldn't be a problem but they don't like frosts.
2 people like this
@Shavkat (46634)
• Philippines
2 May
@JudyEv I think it is also possible to have pumpkins in the backyard. I think my mom is looking for pumpkin seeds in the mark.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
@Shavkat Ours are just in our yard.
2 people like this
• United States
1 May
I think pumpkin scones sounds like a well deserved use of those gourds !
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
Yours is the first comment to mention gourds. At one of the music festivals the band all had stringed instruments made from gourds.
2 people like this
• United States
2 May
@JudyEv oh wow that is clever ! Did they resonate as well as whatever wood the stringed instruments are usually made of ?
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
3 May
@enlightenedpsych2 Because of the shape of them, they were fine. I think they were miked. It was a year or two ago.
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@LadyDuck (121496)
• Switzerland
1 May
Your May is more or less our "November", it makes sense that your pumpkins are ripe now. I love pumpkin soups and even pumpkin jam.
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
I don't think I've ever tried pumpkin jam. It seems you can make pumpkin jam out of almost anything.
3 people like this
@LadyDuck (121496)
• Switzerland
1 May
@JudyEv I make it with only one variety, the Potimarron (Red kuri squash), because it has a nice chestnut aftertaste. I add cinnamon while boiling and raw sugar cane, it's very good in winter.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
@LadyDuck That sounds really nice. I don't think I've ever seen raw sugar cane here although I guess you can buy it in the areas where sugar-cane is grown.
2 people like this
@garymarsh6 (12097)
• United Kingdom
1 May
Well done that is quite some specimen. Yes the scones sound delicious too. Would they be sweet or savoury? I could imagine them with some nice strong cheese? We do not really cook pumpkins. I think my wife made some kind of tart with one once. I think they are very popular in the USA
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
When I was a child it was a staple vegetable - mashed potato, mashed pumpkin then something green. The scones would be savoury and yes, nice with cheese. We don't have pumpkin pies in Australia.
2 people like this
@garymarsh6 (12097)
• United Kingdom
1 May
@JudyEv Thanks Judy. They are relatively a new phenomena here in the UK. I think my wife added ginger to the pumpkin pie it was quite tasty although not something I would necessarily opt for again!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
@garymarsh6 I'm surprised they're newish. Maybe it's too wet and they rot before they ripen. We plant them pretty much at the beginning of summer or so that they ripen in summer. Most other vegies are doing it tough by then. Another assumption down the drain. Pumpkin pie seems strange to me too - like putting gravy on ice-cream. Who would have thought a post about the humble pumpkin would interest anyone? I'll have to see if they're on sale in Ireland when we go.
2 people like this
@just4him (91547)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
1 May
Pumpkin scones sounds interesting. I've never seen a pumpkin (squash) look like the one in your picture. We have lots of different types of squash here and pumpkins. They are separated. A pumpkin is a pumpkin - orangish yellow, and all the rest are squash - different varieties.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
I'm beginning to get the picture now about how you call these things. Ours are all pumpkins of different varieties. Mostly we see bigger green ones.
2 people like this
• United States
2 May
@JudyEv Keep it simple.. they're all gourds!
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
@katsmeow1213 That's a great principle isn't it? The KISS principle.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 May
I guess your 'pumkins' are different from ours. I always thought pumpkin pie was the way to go until I found out sweet potatoe pies are more flavorful. Can you make pie from that one?
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
Pumpkin pie isn't big over here. I never heard of it as a kid. Pumpkins were used in soups, stews and baked and that was about it. Would you call this a squash?
• United States
1 May
@JudyEv I would call it a squash. Our pumpkins are a different shape and color. I have not looked it up but I 'assume' it's all in the squash family.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
@AbbyGreenhill Okay. I get it about the shape. Certainly they're all in the squash family but for me the butternut is a very distinctive shape whereas this one is round and squat although the top doesn't sink down like a Halloween pumpkin for instance.
• Lakewood, Colorado
1 May
I love the buttnernuts best Judy. I think I would love some of those.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
I only got three or four butternuts this year. I like the butternuts best.
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• Lakewood, Colorado
1 May
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@CRK109 (14355)
• United States
2 May
Wow that's a great size! Nothing beats fresh pumpkin!
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
It's not that big really - not as pumpkins go - but plenty big enough for the two of us.
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@CRK109 (14355)
• United States
2 May
@JudyEv Last October, I went out to get a pumpkin of my own and that's about the size I got for me. It was just perfect. I've never been someone who needed huge pumpkins, even when I used to carve jack-o-lanterns.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
3 May
@CRK109 The butternuts are much easier to cut too than some of our varieties. I haven't cut one of these yet but we'll have some of it tonight with our dinner so I'll soon find out.
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@nitirrbb7 (938)
• India
1 May
That pumpkin is huge 3+ kg never saw that big.
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
We would consider this a small one. Did you know they have competitions for growing giant pumpkins? Here is a link: Do you grow them in India?
Home Books Seeds Estimating Tapes Cart World Record Achievements The Growers and Pumpkins below have been officially declared World Champions and World Records. William Warnock 1900, 400 pound world record. The first to grow a world record. Officially weig
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• India
2 May
@JudyEv A 3+ pumpkin is considered small then what would be minimum to maximum size be. Yeah we grow them in India but never heard of any competition to grow a big one. And we mostly use them only to prepare Indian vegetarian dishes.
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
@nitirrbb7 Some might be twice as big I guess. In the shops they are mostly cut up and sold as pieces of varying weights. I remember now that I've had pumpkin in Indian dishes.
1 person likes this
@Platespinner (18472)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
1 May
I'm not sure what type of squash is in your photo, but that isn't what we would consider a pumpkin. These are pumpkins, and while "white" pumpkins are a thing at the moment (more of a pale creamy yellow than white), most are orange.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
Thanks for the photo. I think the one in my photo might be called a Japanese pumpkin but it's still a pumpkin to us. We have a more typical pumpkin shaped pumpkin (!) called a Queensland blue and you just about need a wedge and sledge-hammer to get through it. It is a dark dapple-green. Most of our pumpkin shaped varieties are green. Taking my camera to the supermarket next time! It's amazing what you don't take notice of.
1 person likes this
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
2 May
@JudyEv Your photo doesn't look like a true pumpkin shape to me, it looks a bit pointy on the top. It may very well be a variety of squash that doesn't grow over here.
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
@Platespinner I understand about the pointy top. It's not really a classic pumpkin shape.
1 person likes this
@HazySue (17022)
• United States
1 May
Make the pumpkin scones, they are so good. Do you ever try pumpkin muffins?
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
I haven't tried muffins but I might make some scones today. I'm getting all hungry now!
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@HazySue (17022)
• United States
2 May
@JudyEv all this talk about cooking is making me hungry too.
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
3 May
@HazySue I was so hungry I ate three scones! I OD'd.
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@allknowing (55700)
• India
2 May
Mutations are what we get to see these days. Whatever be it,how to make use of something you have grown is what you should be planning on - scones is a good idea
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
I might make scones this afternoon.
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@allknowing (55700)
• India
2 May
@JudyEv Share some with us (lol)
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
@allknowing I'm waiting for the mashed pumpkin to get cold. I'll put up a post when they're done.
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@Juliaacv (23076)
• Canada
1 May
Judging by the size if this squash, either you or Vince have a green thumb. I love baked squash--enjoy it!
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 May
So you're calling it a squash too. I thought it was pumpkin!
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (23076)
• Canada
1 May
@JudyEv That is what we refer to it as up here. Pumpkins are usually orange in colour, although I've seen white ones as well as green ones. I would imagine that you calling them pumpkins is standard down under.
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (23076)
• Canada
2 May
@JudyEv Don't ya just love it?
1 person likes this
• Malaysia
2 May
Wow! That's huge! I am soooo jealous right now. My pumpkin vines only produced three pumpkins so far, and I hope they can reach maturity soon. The pumpkin here is always the round, orange variety.
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
My vines haven't produced a lot. I think I have about another five to pick but they aren't quite ready yet.
• Malaysia
2 May
@JudyEv Let us pray together that they matured soon. I am looking forward to my mom's 'masak lemak' which is pumpkin cooked in coconut milk. If it is possible I might try making pumpkin pie. Pumpkin scones sounds good too.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
3 May
@shaqziad1610 I've made a note of the 'masak lemak' and will look up the recipe.
@katsmeow1213 (28917)
• United States
2 May
Is it supposed to be green? I am thinking of planting pumpkins this year. I bought some seeds. We don't really eat pumpkin, but I was thinking we could just grow our own for the kids to carve. They might enjoy that. Normally I'm not interested in gardening, or baking..
1 person likes this
• United States
2 May
I read some other comments and see that it's actually a squash not a pumpkin.. that's why I was confused about the color. I once started a discussion about a meal we eat called chicken & biscuits (should have called it chicken & dumplings, but same difference here). Yeah, that sparked all sorts of confusion.
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
They're all pumpkins here whatever the colour. They are easy to grow but need 22C to ripen and they are susceptible to frost. Sometimes I don't go near mine for weeks but they are on reticulation so get watered regularly. I'm not a gardener or baker either.
• United States
2 May
@JudyEv We have a cold front coming through, so I won't plant mine for another couple weeks..
1 person likes this
@suziecat7 (3463)
• Asheville, North Carolina
1 May
It looks like a winter squash to me which is something I enjoy. My favorite is the acorn squash and your photo reminds me of a larger version of it.
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@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
I don't know the acorn squash. I'm taking my camera to the supermarket next time to get photos of what's available there. I never pay any attention really. This might be a variety called a Japanese pumpkin. We seem to call them all pumpkins.
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@suziecat7 (3463)
• Asheville, North Carolina
2 May
@JudyEv Here's a squash link I found - none are quite like yours so I'll have to look up pumpkin. :))
Your guide to holiday pumpkins and squash.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (100470)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 May
@suziecat7 Thanks for the link. Here, they're virtually all called pumpkin. I have grown the butternuts which I saw on 'your' site. It seems that, in the US, if they're yellow or orange they're pumpkins; otherwise they're squash.
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