Good For You

@andriaperry (56677)
United States
June 11, 2017 1:50pm CST
I know words do not have the same meaning in one part of the country as the other. Living in the deep South is a completely different lifestyle than the Northern USA, the same from East to West. But lately, I have been told or read it on others discussions " Good for you." Up North I am not so sure how people use these words but down South, in Alabama, saying "good for you" is a rude, mocking words. Good for you means : "Oh boy dont you think your s h i t don`t stink." I cannot ever remember using " good for you" as a comment to anyone. When I first began to use these sites back in 2013 I had to get used to " letting those words go" because I was no longer sure how they were intended. But if they means the same up there as down here and you used them to comment for my discussion then you have no idea who I am. If you use those words how are they intended?
13 people like this
15 responses
@TheHorse (71234)
• Pleasant Hill, California
11 Jun 17
I sometimes use "Well, alrighty then" as a bit of a cut. And doesn't "Bless her heart" have some edge to it as well?
3 people like this
• United States
11 Jun 17
In the south if someone says bless your heart it is not a nice thing even if they say it with a smile on their face.
4 people like this
@1creekgirl (11510)
• United States
11 Jun 17
@AbbyGreenhill Well, actually sometimes in the south, it's meant as a show of concern and affection.
@1creekgirl (11510)
• United States
11 Jun 17
Bless your heart can be either sarcastic or affectionate, depending on your tone of voice.
2 people like this
@jaboUK (54877)
• United Kingdom
11 Jun 17
In my world it means 'well done' - it's a compliment. So I may well have used it on your discussions, so ok - I have no idea who you are.
3 people like this
@marlina (76827)
• Canada
11 Jun 17
In my world, like Jabo's world, it is a well meaning wording. Positive, not negative.
2 people like this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
LOL, see what I mean. Here it means Suzie homemaker - good two toes and all that.
2 people like this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
@marlina See how words are used differently?
2 people like this
• United States
11 Jun 17
Here in the West, good for you means that is good. Not in a mocking way. That being said..I know also how you mean and have heard it being used in a different way as in Whoopee Ding good for you lol
3 people like this
@TheHorse (71234)
• Pleasant Hill, California
11 Jun 17
How does "The Humanity!" translate for you?
2 people like this
• United States
11 Jun 17
@TheHorse What humanity? None around this way lol
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
YES! that is how its meant down here, whoopee!
2 people like this
@BelleStarr (39631)
• United States
11 Jun 17
I am not sure if I have used them but it is not a rude term it means you have done a good thing. I am northern through and through but I would never use something to be little someone on here. I more often say "you go girl" which would mean about the same thing.
2 people like this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
I am like you, I would not say that, I am " way to go!"
1 person likes this
@sharon6345 (136002)
• United States
11 Jun 17
I find my ex very different than what I am used to now that he lives in Alabama. He uses words that we are not used to. To me, he sounds terrible and what is worse is that accent when we are all together. he is moving in 5 years and I pray he loses all of that. I find myself feeling a tug of war type thing when we conversate. It sounds like he thinks people are below him. I hung up on him last night because I was about to curse at him. If he comes next week or month I will see him. But it would not bother me if he doesn't come. Good for you is a compliment from me to someone.
2 people like this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
Oh yes, there are people all over the country that have that " I am better than you voice/ tone" Put him in his place if he has done went and got uppidy.
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Jun 17
I am from up there as you call it and I've never said Good for you..and it can be used in a negative or positive...if you won the lottery I might say - good for you! What's wrong with that? Now if you wind up in the poor house saying good for you would not be a nice thing. You can't take things out of context and blame a whole region for something.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
Yes mother.
• United States
12 Jun 17
@andriaperry Well, I am no one's mother.....
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
12 Jun 17
@AbbyGreenhill LOL, I felt scolded.
@rebelann (42509)
• El Paso, Texas
12 Jun 17
I mean them as they look, I genuinely mean Good for you if I use that term. I find that when writing online there is no reason to insult anyone, I don't know anyone well enough to do that.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
12 Jun 17
Its unbelievable how many people do insult others online. Most people I let i go because I know they mean well.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (42509)
• El Paso, Texas
12 Jun 17
I never ran into that even when I wrote on Gather.com or Bubblews @andriaperry and since my FB page is restricted I only have real friends who can call me if they want to raz me.
@Blondie2222 (22393)
• United States
12 Jun 17
We use good for you as a compliment not as a harsh word like you folks do. I don't use that saying too often i try to put it in other words.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
12 Jun 17
ME too! I try to say it where a compliment is " way to go!" or yayyy!
@Blondie2222 (22393)
• United States
13 Jun 17
@Srbageldog (8227)
• United States
12 Jun 17
It depends how it's said. It can literally mean "good for you!" in a non-mocking way, but it is also used in a sarcastic, insulting manner. I have used it as both, but I don't go around commenting it to people! I think if I read it on one of my posts, I would probably take it as someone being rude, but I'm a pessimist.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
12 Jun 17
A few have said it to me, but I know them well enough to know its not about jealousy.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jun 17
@andriaperry It's so hard to tell with text. Good to know they were not being snarky.
@1creekgirl (11510)
• United States
11 Jun 17
I have lived in NC for many years and I often say good for you as a compliment or praise. But I can imagine your meaning when it's said in a very sarcastc tone of voice.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
And typing is a hard way to " hear" how its meant.
1 person likes this
@1creekgirl (11510)
• United States
12 Jun 17
@andriaperry That's true.
@teamfreak16 (41167)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
11 Jun 17
Good for you can be taken both ways, depending upon how it's said. Kind of hard to discern in writing, though.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
I know, that is why I try not to let this Southern blood boil when someone writes that.
1 person likes this
@amadeo (70794)
• United States
11 Jun 17
well done here.LOL
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
Now that is clear as can be!
@Corbin5 (113475)
• United States
11 Jun 17
I really do not use those word if my memory serves me right. I use "Way to go!" I think even here in the Chicago area, "Good for you!" is a sarcastic phrase.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
I use way to go also.
• Jacksonville, Florida
11 Jun 17
I was raised in NY and lived in the South since I was 18, those words have the same meaning in both places. The way you have said it here is the way I would take it as well.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (56677)
• United States
11 Jun 17
LOL, I had a feeling.
@jobelbojel (7566)
• Philippines
16 Jun 17
Oppps! I think I have used this in one or two or even three more. If I am correct, here in the Philippines, when someone or say I use it, I mean to say, it is good that the blessing happens to the writer or speaker. "Good for you that you are blessed" "good for you" you've got good grades, because I did not excel in school. Something like that. Now, I know what it connotes in your place.