Facing Retirement far too early

@Inlemay (16740)
South Africa
June 19, 2017 3:21am CST
With a big bang this morning, my hubby sent me an email with a letter stating that he can go on early retirement as of next month. The package involved is very generous - however WHAT IS HE GOING TO DO WITH HIMSELF? I am in a bit of a state and later I am off to visit some friends that have done this about 2 years ago - just to find out how to bridge WORKING into RETIREMENT at the age of 58 . . . . I just cant get my head around it. Good Morning to all of you - I hope Monday treats you well! Everyone's opinion is welcome!
24 people like this
25 responses
@Marty1 (16157)
• Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
19 Jun
My dad retired at 61 years old and had a good life. He and my mom were inseparable, and he took her everywhere she wanted to go. He retired because he was in constant pain from a stack of tires packed to the ceiling fell on his back at work. Even though he was in pain, he was able to have a decent life.He loved to call his last place of employment to talk to his parts men under him when he worked when it either snowed a ton or was frigid and say he was just sitting down in his kitchen to his second cup of coffee! He was just kidding as he was the most good-natured man I ever met! He even gave a laugh after saying it!
7 people like this
@Shiva49 (7858)
• Singapore
19 Jun
Yes, I too visit places with my wife without having to worry about work accumulating. I feel I can survive anywhere as I feel as earthlings we should not complain as everything is temporary - siva
3 people like this
@Marty1 (16157)
• Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
19 Jun
@Shiva49 My parents did not go far. He just took her shopping and dinner out most days of the week. At least he did until the last year of his life as he became sick and was not allowed by his doctors to go out in weather that Was either too hot or cold. My mom also sent him the grocery store for food a lot when the weather was right
5 people like this
@Shiva49 (7858)
• Singapore
19 Jun
@Marty1 Good to hear such mutual love between your parents. That is very rare indeed and a hard act to follow. We are now going to nearby countries mostly though we did go to Europe last year. I feel all should enjoy some retired life to smell the roses as working life can be quite demanding - siva
4 people like this
@MALUSE (24737)
• Denmark
19 Jun
What is your husband's opinion? Does the thought of stopping working make him happy or sad? Do you really need the retirement money? Does he have a hobby occupying much time? Is it possible to find another, maybe lighter, job with fewer work hours at his age? Could he work half-time in his present job?
4 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
19 Jun
The retirement package is NOT compulsory but on offer to anyone over 58 so that place can be made for the younger workers climbing the ladder. My hubby loves his job and he is 2 years away from 40 years service. He has no hobbies at all - he just goes fishing every other week-end. His health is good - I am not sure what spurred him on to send me the letter and ask me to check our finances and see if its an option. We are financially GOOD Oh goodness me - I feel so young to be thinking like this
3 people like this
@MALUSE (24737)
• Denmark
19 Jun
@Inlemay What does he say about filling the free time? He must have thought about it.
3 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
@MALUSE Not a thought about it YET!
@Asylum (44130)
• Manchester, England
19 Jun
I remember a friend of mine saying that everyone had warned him that he would be bored in retirement, yet he soon discovered that he was so preoccupied that he could not understand how he had ever found time to work. When my retirement was due I was told the same, but soon felt the very same way.
4 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
I am hoping that my hubby finds that too - I never get bored, there is just too much life to live to be bored but then he and I dont see life through the same rose coloured glasses.
2 people like this
@Asylum (44130)
• Manchester, England
20 Jun
@Inlemay It is surprising how quickly you can something to occupy your time.
2 people like this
@Shiva49 (7858)
• Singapore
22 Jun
@Asylum When I was working it was like in prison as my way was full involvement and issues tend to fall on my lap too. As age caught up I knew this was a sure way to ill health. I know my retired life cannot bring in income like when I worked but I can manage to survive. No one knows how long we can last here, so better to err on the safer side to enjoy some time; if I linger on, so be it! siva
1 person likes this
@marlina (52405)
• Canada
19 Jun
I think that the most important thing is for him to decide what he wants to do. It is his life ater all.
4 people like this
@topffer (26820)
• France
19 Jun
If the package was good I would not hesitate a second to take it. I am doing most of my job at home, I can continue like this during years, but I am thinking at a lot of things more interesting to do. One of my best friends was an army doctor, he retired at 42, and he was never occupied at the army like he is today.
3 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
You give me hope - as we are more or less the same age.
1 person likes this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
the package is GOOD
1 person likes this
@dodo19 (24545)
• Beaconsfield, Quebec
19 Jun
My grandmother retired at 60, but she was completely happy with it. Right now, my parents are 61 and 65 and both working. But I think they want to retire in the next 4-5 years. That's their choice. Everyone is different. I think your husband should take time and at least think about it. Everyone is different.
3 people like this
@LadyDuck (95243)
• Switzerland
19 Jun
If he had a good proposal it was a great idea to accept. The hardest time will be for you. You have not the habit to have him around all the time. I know that my Grandmother was mad when my Grandfather retired and he was all day at home.
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
My greatest fear
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (95243)
• Switzerland
20 Jun
@Inlemay I know that for many this is a problem. I had no changes as we worked together all our life.
1 person likes this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
@LadyDuck I am hoping whatever happens - hubby and I can get through it like we have done all the other things in our life
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Jun
he's fortunate to've such a package, the hubs's not 'n hopefully will continue workin' 'til he's 't least 67. why 67? coz that'll gimme 3 more years to figure what i can do to keep my sanity once he does retire.
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
If this retirement happens I have 3 months to figure out how to handle my sanity
1 person likes this
• United States
20 Jun
@Inlemay i feel fer ya, hon! i fear the day the hubs walks'n to tell me he's done 'it'.
1 person likes this
@Jessicalynnt (48309)
• Centralia, Missouri
19 Jun
will working hurt him? like say a part time job doing something he finds amusing, or a hobby that has him out volunteering or something
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
I think that is what he has in mind - something after retirement part time FOR THE FUN of it as we are secure financially
1 person likes this
• Centralia, Missouri
20 Jun
@Inlemay pretty much! a job only if it's something odd he's always wanted to do, or a hobby, or volunteering somewhere or something
1 person likes this
@thelme55 (7875)
• Germany
19 Jun
Your husband has to think it well. It is his decision. Maybe he has plans on what he has to do in his spare time. He might get bored without a hobby. I heard some wives here that there were more quarrels at home because the wives felt suffocated from no more space for themselves. The husbands were giving more work to their wives. I think you both should weight the positive and negative side of an early retirement.
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
You have given me some great advice - thank you
1 person likes this
@thelme55 (7875)
• Germany
20 Jun
@Inlemay you are very welcome.
1 person likes this
@Shiva49 (7858)
• Singapore
19 Jun
I was half- retired working part time for years before the real thing, almost. I started the slow 'descent" at 50 years plus and almost at ground level now. Though money is not a big issue I sometimes feel why not stretch working life a bit. However, I have no regrets as being in the finance and accounts field others tend to unload their rubbish on to me at the last minute. I spend my time busy with household chores that a man is more adept at and helping my wife. Then, of course, on the computer. As my interests are varied time flies - siva
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
thank you for your comment - luckily we started the slow descent at 55 - but that was 3 years ago and now with a VRS - retirement is a reality more than a working conclusion at the moment.
1 person likes this
@Shiva49 (7858)
• Singapore
20 Jun
@Inlemay Best of luck. Pursue your passions that remained stifled so far and live the moments like I do now. Frankly, I feel like a free bird but then I was ready to pay the price for a more conservative take on life. Some "friends" were good riddance but then they replaced by more genuine ones! siva
1 person likes this
@Freelanzer (4627)
• Canada
20 Jun
I retired very early because I could. My husband kept working for three years after and he too retired a bit early though not as early as I did. If you are financially able to why not. I enjoyed every minute of mine on my own, now I am enjoying it with the two of us. I always had a small business on the side so for me it was no issue. My husband is very handy so lots of projects around the home.
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
Thank you for your comment - handy is NOT my hubby, I am the handy one, I just hope once it happens all things will be well.
@youless (81440)
• Guangzhou, China
19 Jun
Here women are retired at the age of 55 and men will be 60 years old. But it seems that the retirement time will delay for people soon later. I think if the finance is fine, it is really OK to retire earlier. As you are still healthy and you can do many things you like and the time and money is no longer a problem. Your new life will be begun
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
that sounds like a very smart comment to me - thank you
1 person likes this
@Kandae11 (16648)
19 Jun
I suppose he'll do the things he always wanted to do but couldn't while he was working. Life is short, enjoy it.
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
thats a fact
@nomus24g (13092)
• India
19 Jun
we call its VRS - Volunteery Retirement Scheme...
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
Thats the thing - all those 58 and over were offered a VRS
1 person likes this
@Rhombus (229)
• South Africa
19 Jun
Personally I would suggest he waits until 60, which is still young enough to start a sideline business /hobby. There are no opportunities here, so even if the package is generous, with our exchange rate and general uncertainty there are no guarantees it will be enough. I would keep working and save save save. I don't mean to sound negative about our beautiful country, however support later on in life may be difficult to obtain. My neighbour retired (age 65), and now at age 75 is working again (as a driver). It's scary
2 people like this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
20 Jun
We are seeing our Pension Scheme Consultant soon and after his advice - he will decide.
1 person likes this
@TRBRocks420 (50621)
• Banks, Oregon
19 Jun
I hope my mom will be able to retire early.
2 people like this
@paigea (18901)
• Canada
20 Jun
It seems to have come out of nowhere. When was he thinking of retiring before this happened? I agree with you he needs to think about what he is going to do with himself before the day he retires. I can't seem to figure that out so I keep working part time.
1 person likes this
@Inlemay (16740)
• South Africa
21 Jun
out of nowhere - 60 is the age at his company which sometimes gets extended till 63 - this might still happen - we are just mulling over the offer.
1 person likes this
@paigea (18901)
• Canada
21 Jun
@Inlemay It is a lot to think about it.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (27492)
• Portland, Connecticut
22 Jun
As long as your hubs has a hobby or two you will have the best time of your life wth retirement. Hubs and I are enjoying ourselves terrifically. However, my hubs is often bored because he doesn't have enough to keep him busy, me, I am never bored.
1 person likes this
@SIMPLYD (70811)
• Philippines
22 Jun
Well, if it is a big amount where one can have a small business and be sufficient with the money for the rest of your lives then it is okay.
1 person likes this