Does Desert Sand come from what was once land under water?

Dallas, Texas
July 11, 2017 4:11pm CST
The sands of time, or the sand dunes of a desert are similar to the sands of the beach at the sea shore. But, on a desert, the sand you walk on under the scorching sun where only heat resistant life forms exist, is that sand something that once was the sand of the bottom of an ancient ocean? There would be of course clues like sea shells, under the sand on a desert or fish bones, if in fact that desert was once covered by miles and miles of ocean. or grass and of huge lakes. Look at this article from Discover Magazine online - Swimming in the Sahara:
The world's largest desert was once a green Eden. One day it will be again.
4 people like this
4 responses
@louievill (19358)
• Philippines
11 Jul 17
Think the reverse also happens, lush green lands could turn to deserts. I went mountain climbing when I was younger and saw a lot of shells, got me wondering how it got there.
2 people like this
• Dallas, Texas
12 Jul 17
I have noticed how quickly a forest can be turned into a desert when a large fire breaks out and burns up habitats that took thousands of years to grow and in an instant are gone forever. Change is a constant.
1 person likes this
@louievill (19358)
• Philippines
12 Jul 17
@lookatdesktop and I had been to a beach where instead of sand there were more or less fist sized rocks all over, could it be that nature is is not yet done pulvurizing it? I did not see any nearby mountain where they could have rolled from. You are right change is constant
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Jul 17
Could be, could well be Anthony. It is all so fascinating. I saw something once about this if I recall correctly. I see the Sahara was once lush and green.
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• Dallas, Texas
12 Jul 17
The history of the Sahara Desert is very interesting. I will have to do more reading on this.
1 person likes this
• United States
12 Jul 17
@lookatdesktop Oh yes it is so interesting all that.
@alberello75 (18427)
• Genova, Italy
11 Jul 17
Interesting article. I did not know that up to 5500 years ago, the Sahara desert, was almost an ocean. Climate change has brought everything to desertification. It could happen in a few hundred years, even in the territories where vegetation is abundant today. It seems impossible nowadays just to think of whole cities swallowed by an unusual desert!
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• Dallas, Texas
12 Jul 17
Looking at the time line from a historical perspective changes our own view of things. We all live in our own time. The changes that the Earth goes through, if it all changed within days or weeks or months instead of years, decades, centuries or millennia, we would not feel a sense of permanence.So, from a human's own lifetime, change is gradual but over the course of thousands of years or millions, change can be so drastic as to put our own species inside a very short moment in the geologic history of Earth.
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@alberello75 (18427)
• Genova, Italy
12 Jul 17
@lookatdesktop As I was told at school, the life of a human being, compared to the geologic era, is like a "cyclia beat" (in italian: battito di ciclia)
@Shavkat (65144)
• Philippines
12 Jul 17
I think it is possible. Some places in my country, it was being submerged under water and created an island by piling up soil in this part for the people to live in.