Not just a ballroom - Chenonceau Chateau

@JudyEv (103764)
Bunbury, Australia
August 11, 2017 1:50am CST
My last post was about Chenonceau Chateau in the Loire Valley in France. The chateau spans the river Cher and the bridge has had a gallery built over it. The gallery is 60 metres long and six metres wide. Eighteen windows let in ample light. The slate tile floor and exposed beams in the ceilings created a magnificent ballroom. However, it has also served in other capacities in its lifetime. During World War I, the chateau was owned by Mr Gaston Menier who set up a 120-bed hospital. All rooms were utilised for medical procedures. A total of 2,254 soldiers were treated with the last of the wounded leaving on December 31, 1918. During World War II, The river Cher was part of the line of demarcation between German-occupied France and Free France. The south door of the gallery gave access to the left bank (free zone) and numbers of Jews and others were smuggled through to safety. The bank was regularly patrolled but once the all clear was given the door would be opened and people could make their way to freedom. A German artillery unit was kept at the ready throughout the war, ready to destroy Chenoneau. It would have been tragic if this beautiful building had been destroyed.
15 people like this
14 responses
@LadyDuck (126508)
• Switzerland
11 Aug
This is a beautiful castle. Have you visited the cellars? During some times of the year I know it is possible to visit, may be in summer it is too crowded.
3 people like this
@teamfreak16 (37071)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
11 Aug
It's unfortunate that the history of a lot of these old buildings is war oriented.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
Sooner or later one of the wars rears its ugly head.
1 person likes this
@xFiacre (7117)
• Ireland
11 Aug
@judyev Cher will be really chuffed to know that she's had a river named after her.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
She will indeed. We haven't come across the Sonny River yet. No wonder he got a bit irate.
@Juliaacv (24505)
• Canada
11 Aug
You've got a great picture here. It looks very massive, I can understand it being used as it was during the war.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
It would have been a very impressive building. I'm glad they didn't destroy it. It would have been a great shame.
1 person likes this
@Jackalyn (6536)
• Oxford, England
11 Aug
It is good some of these buildings are still standing even though I think they did to be destroyed during the war by the way they were used. I often wonder what it would have been like to live in a huge place in the times when Ballrooms and the like were actually used. Some days I could do with a lady's maid.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
When a regal visitor came to these places, they bought with them a huge entourage who all had to be fed and accommodated. It must have been quite stressful for the ones responsible for finding food and beds for everyone.
@SHOHANA (7104)
• Bangladesh
11 Aug
your post representing such a history and this is really a nice post to share. Thanks for sharing it :)
2 people like this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
I'm really pleased that you've enjoyed it.
@Platespinner (19156)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
11 Aug
Fascinating history!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
I've only given snippets of it but there is so much more and all very interesting.
1 person likes this
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
12 Aug
@JudyEv I can only imagine! I'm hoping when we go over to visit our oldest child in Germany next year that my husband will catch the international travel bug and we'll be able to do more of it.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
13 Aug
@Platespinner I've been a bit surprised how much I've enjoyed it really. I could go on almost indefinitely really.
1 person likes this
@just4him (95872)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
11 Aug
I'm glad it wasn't. It has a lot of interesting history.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
I've only given the very bare bones of the history. It's quite fascinating.
1 person likes this
@just4him (95872)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
11 Aug
@JudyEv I'm sure it is.
1 person likes this
@dollaboy (6272)
11 Aug
thanks for sharing this very interesting post, Judy.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
Thanks for the kind words. I hope you're learning something from them.
1 person likes this
@dollaboy (6272)
11 Aug
@JudyEv thanks. I'm learning for sure.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (35906)
• Anniston, Alabama
12 Aug
Its beautiful.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
13 Aug
They have 10 gardeners just to look after all the gardens. The whole place is beautiful.
• Philippines
11 Aug
It's beautiful place, good thing they were able to preserve it though. It's nice to know that this place had saved soldiers and lived to see another day.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
Yes, it is good to think that it served a very useful purpose during the wars.
• United States
11 Aug
I think you are now qualified as a an official tour guide!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
I must admit I'd be keen to help in some way at some of these places - mainly because I'd get to see behind all the locked doors!
@JohnRoberts (42010)
• Los Angeles, California
11 Aug
Plenty of elbow room there. France has done an excellent job of saving and preserving these real life fairy tale buildings that look like movie sets.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
Yes, she has. Many countries could learn from her ideas.
1 person likes this
@TRBRocks420 (64381)
• Banks, Oregon
11 Aug
Yes, would have been very sad if it was destroyed.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (103764)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Aug
A great waste of a magnificent building.