Can you think of phrases that can easily be misinterpreted?

@TheHorse (62481)
Pleasant Hill, California
August 11, 2017 9:33am CST
I just responded to a post by @DianneN in which I used the phrase "turns me off." That got me thinking back to hippy days. "Turns me on" (or off) could have sexual implications ("oh, man, that dress turns me on") but it didn't have to ("oh, man, being in nature turns me on"). I'm not sure if the young people even use that phrase. And then there's "dope." "Dope" is a word upper elementary and slightly older kids in the US use to mean "really cool." ("That fidget spinner is dope!") One of my kid clients got in trouble at school for using that word. To his teacher's generation, "dope" was a noun that referred to illegal drugs. In my early childhood, we used "boss" and "doom" to mean "really cool." And then there's "hook up." I might say that to a friend meaning "let's play baseball catch" or "let's play some guitar." But I gather its implications are more sexual among the 17- to 29-year-old set. And, to add the MyLot international international flavor, I was really pissed at my kid's teacher for getting mad about "dope," but I didn't tell him. I did tell the kid he could use it around me. To a Brit, wouldn't "getting pissed" mean getting drunk? Even the meaning of the word "cracker" has changed. In my younger days, "cracker" was used as an insult to Southern white redneck types. Now it's an insulting term for "white person" in general. Can you think of phrases that can be misinterpreted? Or have different meanings in different countries? Or eras?
19 people like this
13 responses
@kobesbuddy (41166)
• East Tawas, Michigan
11 Aug
Chill out-Rock&Roll-Peace-Get Slammed-Crash at your Pad-SlapMeFive-One Foot in the Grave-Let's Bash-Upstream without a Paddle-Big as a Barrel-FatCat-RunLikeaRaceHorse-BoogieDown-PartyDown
5 people like this
@andriaperry (46700)
• United States
11 Aug
I know up sh it creek without a paddle. LOL
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
Do they have more than one meaning?
1 person likes this
@kobesbuddy (41166)
• East Tawas, Michigan
12 Aug
@TheHorse In answer to your question, I'm doubting there's double meaning to these saying.
@kobesbuddy (41166)
• East Tawas, Michigan
11 Aug
Eat Crow-Party Down-Let's Bash-CrashatSomeone'sPad-SlapMeFive
4 people like this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
11 Aug
Oh, how about "bless her heart"? What does "eat crow" mean, other than "accept that they were way wrong"?
3 people like this
@kobesbuddy (41166)
• East Tawas, Michigan
11 Aug
@TheHorse Some of these words are so misleading! Why would anyone desire to eat a crow??? lol
2 people like this
@andriaperry (46700)
• United States
11 Aug
@TheHorse Eat crow would mean I kicked your butt in an activity. Bless your heart can mean " you poor stupid person" os said in a certain tone of voice, or if someone is sick " bless his heart" means poor sick thing but said with this whining giving pity voice.
1 person likes this
@much2say (38759)
• United States
11 Aug
"That's sick" (which means it's awesome . . . "sick" meant gross or yucky in our time) "It's da bomb" (another awesome . . . "bombed" in our time meant it failed)
4 people like this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
Yep, I remember both "sick" and "da bomb." I think "da bimb" and "da fire" goes back to my generation.
1 person likes this
@teamfreak16 (40553)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
11 Aug
Would "righteous" work?
3 people like this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
11 Aug
Yes. That was "boss" during the Wayne's World era, wasn't it?
1 person likes this
@teamfreak16 (40553)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
12 Aug
@TheHorse - Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
@teamfreak16 Ah, OK.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (147987)
• Switzerland
11 Aug
For me all those double meaning phrases are very difficult, not being English speaking, I can only know the "grammatical" meaning of the words. I know plenty of Italian words that can be misinterpreted.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
11 Aug
Can you give us a couple of examples?
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (147987)
• Switzerland
12 Aug
@TheHorse I have one that comes to my mind, if you studied Italian you know that fico is a fruit (fig), but young girls can refer to a cute young boy saying "he is fico". This means he is beautiful and super cool.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
@LadyDuck Are the two related? Is he "fine," like a delicate fruit?
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (46700)
• United States
11 Aug
A few years ago I picked up " that`s sick!" and it meant good. I did pick up a lot of the newer words when I was promoting a band but those years are over so I don`t use those words much anymore. Edit: "Good for you"
2 people like this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
What does "good for you!" mean to you?
@andriaperry (46700)
• United States
12 Aug
@TheHorse Its usually meant as a smart remark because of jealousy due to an accomplishment that I had achieved and was happy to share. Most people say congrats or way to go, those that say "good for you" is the response from the jealous one.
@Hate2Iron (7667)
• Canada
11 Aug
Can't really think of any off the top of my head, but the ones you mentioned above are pretty familiar with me.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
ome good responses here. And I'm thinking of more.
• Rochester, New York
11 Aug
Bae is a word my niece uses to call her boyfriend. I have to remind her that in Danish it means poop.. so in essence she calls her boyfriend poop just about every day.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
11 Aug
Oh, that's an interesting one! I wonder if my Cousin Ken knows that "ken" means "yes" in Hebrew.
@TheSojourner (17480)
• United States
30 Aug
Oooh....you have reminded me of something...It's on my list to write.... other than that...I remember when I had an ESL student come up and ask me what being "sh**faced" meant. He couldn't understand why people would smear feces on one's face.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
30 Aug
Were you matter-of-fact in explaining it to him?
1 person likes this
• United States
30 Aug
@TheHorse Always. I don't bat an eye. They trust me that I will be "straight" with them.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
30 Aug
@CoralLevang Um, I'm glad. I always got in trouble when I'd "bat an eye," and the fact that I was "straight" with people made them think I was homophobic, when I wasn't.
1 person likes this
@Ceerios (4756)
• Goodfellow, Texas
12 Aug
Howdy "Horse" - Sure enough, I can think of a phrase that might be misinterpreted... "Hippo Potus." ( an overweight president of the USA with an overly large mouth." ) -Gus-
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
Does that include a small but loud mouth that says little of substance?
1 person likes this
@Ceerios (4756)
• Goodfellow, Texas
12 Aug
@TheHorse - Howdy "Horse" - All things are possible, some are impractical, and others are unusual. -Gus-
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
@Ceerios Um, OK. Hippo Potus. The current President of the most powerful nation on Earth.
1 person likes this
@Platespinner (16528)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
12 Aug
Where I grew up a rubber is an eraser.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (62481)
• Pleasant Hill, California
12 Aug
"Oh, I have to buy my eight-year-old some rubbers!" I think of that as an "old-timey" way of describing erasers. Good one.
1 person likes this
@DianneN (74670)
• United States
13 Aug
Gay used to have a different connotation, meaning happy and carefree.
@Lucky15 (33427)
• Philippines
12 Aug
It is here that I am learning of some phrases that I haven't heard of, so...ahmm, yes, none that i know