In Yorkshire in the Psychiatric Hospital

@Jackalyn (6230)
Oxford, England
October 4, 2017 4:56pm CST
I once worked in the infamous High Royds (look it up on youtube if you want nightmares.) New to Yorkshire, I was confused (working on a psych ward,) to be asked to "mash the tea." We worked so hard we were always saying we were "reet lavvered." Buns were cakes. I caught a "Booos" not a bus to work. To this day, I cannot say "bus" that Yorkshire "ooo" stays with you. What always puzzles me is how any foreigner learns English at all because in the part of London my Grandad came from and our house too, you got a cup of "Rosy Lea" and went up the "apples and pears." I leave you to work those two out.
5 people like this
6 responses
@celticeagle (112984)
• Boise, Idaho
4 Oct
Interesting. Not sure what the latter one means.
2 people like this
5 Oct
Something you go up {or down} which rhymes with pears!?
1 person likes this
@Jackalyn (6230)
• Oxford, England
5 Oct
Apples and pears in Cockney rhyming for stairs.
@Jackalyn (6230)
• Oxford, England
5 Oct
in London cockney rhyming slang it is "stairs." Skin and blister is "sister."
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@JudyEv (91810)
• Bunbury, Australia
4 Oct
English accents vary so much don't they? And the rhyming slang doesn't help either although after a while you can usually work out what the translation is.
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@Jackalyn (6230)
• Oxford, England
5 Oct
Yes but that morning I was asked to make the tea on the first day of my job in that psychiatric ward I really thought they'd all lost the plot. All the nurses were expecting me to understand and were completely complex perplexed that I had no idea what they were on about. I guess if you work in a place and you use a language you gradually believe that everybody else will understand you.
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@JudyEv (91810)
• Bunbury, Australia
5 Oct
@Jackalyn That's true and even if you're not sure the person understands, you may be worried about sounding patronising if you spell things out too clearly.
1 person likes this
• Ponce De Leon, Florida
4 Oct
England English is quote perplexing. I have to admit I have had to look several things up when watching BBC
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@Jackalyn (6230)
• Oxford, England
4 Oct
And if you read the Daily Mail it is often so badly edited you end up with a whole new language.
3 people like this
• Malaysia
5 Oct
@Jackalyn Haha good one
1 person likes this
@kobesbuddy (11212)
• East Tawas, Michigan
4 Oct
In a way, you are painting a picture, of what you're doing. Giving a short description of something. I don't understand what it means to mash the tea.
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@Jackalyn (6230)
• Oxford, England
5 Oct
Nor did I. It means to brew the tea. Simple terms just to make everybody a cup of tea.
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@kobesbuddy (11212)
• East Tawas, Michigan
5 Oct
@Jackalyn Hey, that's simple enough to understand, thanks!
1 person likes this
5 Oct
My MiL is from Yorkshire and my niece and I are are always having to correct her pronunciation of bus and butter!
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@Jackalyn (6230)
• Oxford, England
5 Oct
Oh yes, butter it is another one I can't say properly anymore. Don't know why these things stuck with me for a lifetime but they have.
@cahaya1983 (6922)
• Malaysia
5 Oct
And yet being a foreigner I still consider it a fun language to learn
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@Jackalyn (6230)
• Oxford, England
5 Oct
I suppose it is but I would hate to be a foreigner learning it.
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