Idealist vs Realist

@much2say (35431)
United States
October 6, 2017 12:50pm CST
I've been busy with volunteer stuff for my little son's school. (Sidenote: I'll jump back in here eventually - thanks for your patience!). This morning the teacher had had us lingering parents putting together a bunch of the kids' schoolwork. Collating, stapling, taping . . . there was a lot, but they were easy to do . . . just a few less things the teacher has to deal with. (Sidenote: My hat goes off to teachers - I don't know how they handle 25some children in the classroom everyday! As we were working away, I mentioned to two of the other moms how the kids must be very "busy, busy" with all this work they are doing. One mom, who is sweet but rarely there says cheerfully "Oh, but the kids must be so happy and smiling all day !" The other mom who volunteers a lot in the classroom replied "Yah, but by afternoon they are all yawning !". Hmmmmm . . . which is more like it ? What was your perception of being in the classroom? Were you eager to learn or bored out of your mind?
41 people like this
41 responses
@celticeagle (115025)
• Boise, Idaho
6 Oct
In some classes I was bored out of my mind while in others I was eager to learn. Depended on the subject and the teacher.
7 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
6 Oct
True. If anything, I dreaded math! And having great teachers made a huge difference too!
4 people like this
@celticeagle (115025)
• Boise, Idaho
7 Oct
@much2say .....I also dreading math. I loved history and English.
2 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
8 Oct
@celticeagle I wasn't great with history either, but I will say I am much more appreciative of reading about history these days. And funny but I understand math better at this age too.
3 people like this
@MALUSE (32847)
• Denmark
6 Oct
Who can answer your last question? All in all, I went to school for 13 years before I attended university. (What Americans do in Junior College is done at the end of secondary grammar school in Germany and other European countries). There were enough situations to get bored stiff or to be enthusiastic about a topic.
4 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
6 Oct
We end high school at 12th grade, roughly age 17/18 . . . so in essence, there is more schooling in Germany before one graduates and goes on to a university? That actually makes more sense to me . . . as I've seen so many not ready for university life at this age. True - we all have opportunities to experience both boredom and enthusiasm for a subject. I guess generally speaking I meant did you enjoy school or not.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32847)
• Denmark
6 Oct
@much2say German children go to elementary school for four years. Then they have the choice between three different types of school according to their intelligence. All pupils have to go to school until they're 18 years old. 1. Five more years of basic schooling. The school type is called 'main school'. This can lead to simple jobs (shop-assistants, craftspeople, builders, butchers, tailors, etc.. For these jobs, they have to go to trade schools for three years. 2. Six more years at a so-called 'middle school' for jobs like bank clerks, secretaries, etc, etc.. Three more years for all jobs. 3. Eight more years in a 'secondary grammar school'. After the final exam, they can go to university if the marks/grades are good enough and study. --- I didn't like school very much. I studied foreign languages and worked as a teacher at secondary grammar schools for 40 years.
4 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
8 Oct
@MALUSE It's interesting that when I talk to folks from other countries, they break down the school years into the various job levels (thank you for explaining that!). But here, we don't really speak that way for some reason. Everyone is expected to graduate from high school minimally (although obviously there are drop outs) and the big push is for all to go college. I rarely hear about encouragement to enter a trade school during school years. To me it seems like the focus is about everyone getting the same general education to a certain point - and then honing in on the specifics of an occupation later on down the line. Perhaps it would be better if we spoke more openly about the realities of how our education relates to the kinds of jobs it equates to - it might motivate more to stay in school or at least work harder in school. Sorry to say, but I think our education system is a bit backwards here. I wasn't into school very much either . . . but I would surely enjoy going back to school if I could now. I could totally see you as a teacher .
2 people like this
@jstory07 (58253)
• Roseburg, Oregon
12 Oct
By the end of the day all of the kids must be tired. Ready to quit and go home.
3 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
16 Oct
Definitely so. I'm sure teachers must feel like this too!
2 people like this
@alberello75 (13518)
• Genova, Italy
7 Oct
Ideal or real, it is not the same thing! The ideal, basically, does not exist! What we see every day is the reality of things. Whether they are material or immaterial. The first mother said an IDEALIST phrase. The second, on the other hand, saw how in truth things were (from what I understood, the children were tired!). I however prefer to afford my life on the REAL things. Ideal for me rest "a dreams close into a drawer". (Maybe one day it will go out?)
2 people like this
@alberello75 (13518)
• Genova, Italy
8 Oct
@much2say Is always possible to dream. But where bring our dreams? Nowhere! I, perhaps worse than you, arrived to 42 years old, making a bad lifestyle. (About these my problems, if you are interested, I could deepen them in other posts)
2 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
12 Oct
@alberello75 Well, dreams are good . . . as long as your head is not in the clouds all the time and you come right back down to earth to work on making these dreams happen. But of course some dreams are more realistic than others. Bad lifestyle? What's going on?
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
16 Oct
@alberello75 But think how much it would help economically if you completely got rid of smoking!
1 person likes this
@DianneN (59483)
• United States
8 Oct
I loved school when I was a student. It was much more difficult as a teacher, although I enjoyed my work immensely. Kudos to you for helping out!
2 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
16 Oct
I don't mind helping the teacher with the manual stuff . . . but I have discovered I am not good with the teaching stuff. It is NOT easy - with all those kids, varying levels and temperaments . . . I seriously bow down BIG TIME to all teachers who has this task of education our children.
1 person likes this
@DianneN (59483)
• United States
17 Oct
@much2say Teaching isn't for everyone, but I'm certain you do a wonderful job with your own TWO children. ()
2 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
17 Oct
@DianneN TWO I was discussing this with another mom. We both say it's easier to direct our own children and do not hesitate at all . . . but it's hard to "enforce" things on other children. Kudos to those who CAN teach!
1 person likes this
@DeborahDiane (16216)
• Laguna Woods, California
14 Oct
@much2say - SmilePie - I loved school and enjoyed being a student, but I was often tired in the afternoon. I think that is normal.
2 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
15 Oct
Perhaps that's a normal human trait to be pooped out in the afternoon. I always thought it was interesting that other countries get in "nap time" (extra long lunch hours during work) as adults - we'd never get that here! Kids are quite tired later on in the day - I do often hear they are "too tired" to do their homework .
1 person likes this
• Laguna Woods, California
16 Oct
@much2say - I think humans all hit a low spot in the afternoon when they need to rest. I believe it hurts our health when we force ourselves to push past that low and force ourselves to keep going!
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
16 Oct
@DeborahDiane I think a lot of people around the world are saying that Americans are too stressed this way - we're always on the go go go - in a sense, we are mostly not given the option at school or work to take that needed long afternoon rest.
1 person likes this
• Lakewood, Colorado
10 Oct
Oh I was always content and happy to be at school and more than eager to learn. I loved school.
2 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
11 Oct
Awwww . . . I'll bet you were such a wonderful student!
1 person likes this
• Lakewood, Colorado
11 Oct
@much2say I was so shy and quiet back then Much were you? So good of you to help out at school now
3 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
11 Oct
@TiarasOceanView Oh yes! I was such a quiet kid too! I'm actually out of my comfort zone in volunteering at school like I am doing this year . . . but I guess it's a growing experience for me - my parents would never have done this!
1 person likes this
@teamfreak16 (36578)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
7 Oct
I admire teachers and always thank them for doing it. I had quite a few favorites over the years.
2 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
8 Oct
I always thank the teachers whenever possible too . . . I seriously don't know how they do it all!
2 people like this
@teamfreak16 (36578)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
8 Oct
@much2say - I certainly don't have the patience to do it.
2 people like this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
11 Oct
@teamfreak16 Me neither! I don't think I could make it through an entire year - let alone one day !
3 people like this
@crossbones27 (15115)
• Redlands, California
3 Nov
25, we had 32 and probably 30 average. We were one of the most populated schools in California when I graduated in 1995. They have since made a new high school and it was in 2008 of all times. This city be rich and just shows you they about the money, not the results. Results if it gets them the money.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
3 Nov
In our school, it's 25some up til a certain grade I think . . . but beyond that I know the classrooms are way overpacked with at least 30 kids (especially 5th grade close to 35). But back in the 90s, that would be super big for sure. Are you in the same area as you were back then (I am)? But now money isn't being thrown into education which is horrible . . . and if money doesn't go into education, how is the next generation in our country going to make it? Schools already have problems - and it's not only about being overpacked!
1 person likes this
• Redlands, California
3 Nov
@much2say Yeah same area, but our schools get paid and also look like prisons now. When I was there, was open campus, now all fenced up. I have preached to the choir that their is something wrong when schools look like that to my teacher friends. They agree, but see no way around it.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
4 Nov
@crossbones27 My daughter's middle school is one of the only open campuses around here (I went to that middle school too - and it was open campus then) . . . many parents have issues with it these days (I don't). My old high school was that way too - but since then they put fences around it - so weird to me. At the same time, it's a different world and not a safe one - lots of creeps around. I just wish they put more money into the real education part . . . sometimes I think the focus of where the budgeted money goes is in the wrong place.
1 person likes this
• China
7 Oct
You got a chance to sit in for teachers and got an idea of what the teachers' work was like.I think what the latter mom said is about the size of it,who is Realist.However I remember I didn't have so much schoolwork in the classroom.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
8 Oct
This is why I am NOT a teacher - I couldn't do what they do - and frankly I don't know how teachers do it all! You did not have much schoolwork in the classroom? As much as I like our teacher, I really do not like our education system . . . there is so much pressure on the kids.
1 person likes this
• China
9 Oct
@much2say I did have less schoolworks in my schooldays than today's students.I think students should be allowed to work at their own pace.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
11 Oct
@changjiangzhibin89 I am very surprised about the things my son learns in 2nd grade. We had a lot of schoolwork, but different kind of schoolwork . . . a lot of my son's schoolwork is based on serious academics - even more than when my daughter was in 2nd grade. I feel like our education here is more about catching up with the rest of the world's education - but they're not doing it in the most productive way - and the kids suffer for it.
1 person likes this
@Daelii (2091)
• United States
2 Dec
It depends on the subject!
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
3 Dec
What was your favorite - and least favorite? I don't know if I had a favorite (besides the creative ones - academics made me cringe) - and for sure I hated math.
1 person likes this
@Daelii (2091)
• United States
3 Dec
@much2say I loved science and hated math. I still can't get my math teachers obnoxiousness out of my head when doing any math. I could easily do the work in my head and they would be p*** I solved problems before the rest of the class. Not to mention any time i wrote things down they critiqued my writing. I naturally wrote small. It was neat. but not "acceptable". they said to write big, so i did. but doing so it was to sloppy to be graded. to small to be graded. no matter how i wrote it, she always gave me an F. My mom argued with her over this treatment and after she "stopped harassing me on writing" I was sent to the principals office over random bullcrap. Even the principal agreed my writing was fine. My favorite was serving detention for cursing her out on a day I wasn't even in school that day! Overall, I really don't like that subject! btw, she never stopped harassing me on my writing. instead of F's shed switch between D's and C's though the work was correct.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
7 Dec
@Daelii Wow! Well the difference between your not liking math and mine is that you actually understood math . Oh my gosh - I remember having friends who wrote very teeny - I thought it was so cute but I know it makes teachers squint. That's terrible they gave you an F for it. And it's terrible how that teacher treated you . . . it's as if she took any reason to bring you down .
1 person likes this
• Mombasa, Kenya
13 Oct
Afternoons in class suck!!
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
16 Oct
It seems like time is stretched out much longer, doesn't it?
• Mombasa, Kenya
18 Oct
@much2say Yeah, I struggled as a student, still struggling as a teacher
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
18 Oct
@joanwanjala Oh wow, what do you teach? I did ok as a student, but honestly could have done better. I volunteer for my son's 2nd grade class almost every morning . . . it's one thing to learn, but it's a huge challenge to teach others.
@rebelann (32331)
• El Paso, Texas
7 Oct
I only remember the later years, those seemed boring because the teachers were targeting their lessons to the students they knew would do well .... it must have been the times.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
8 Oct
Well, I can see how teachers still do play favoritism sometimes, but they can't do it in the way of lessons now as all the students will be tested for their progress (apparently these tests show if the teachers are getting the kids to where they are supposed to be). And they have to follow a curriculum that all are using - they can't teach the way they want to teach, it seems.
1 person likes this
@rebelann (32331)
• El Paso, Texas
8 Oct
I've heard that too @much2say Recently I read that teachers are beginning to try to find out how their students learn in order to better teach them, I would have benefitted from that kind of teaching.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
12 Oct
@rebelann Oh, that would be great if everyone was taught that way - not everyone learns the same way. That would be too cool if education could be tailor made for each and every student !
1 person likes this
@ebanreb (4815)
• Philippines
14 Nov
I am always eager to learn new things. We need it because we are building and molding our future in the classroom
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
19 Nov
It's definitely needed . . .having a good foundation in our youth only opens up to wider options in the future.
1 person likes this
@ebanreb (4815)
• Philippines
19 Nov
@much2say That is correct. Youth foundation is one of the things that we cannot deny that helps change the world for the better
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
19 Nov
1 person likes this
@MarymargII (8354)
• Toronto, Ontario
19 Oct
A little of both I would say. I loved the subjects that interested me but like all kids/adults I was bored with the ones I wasn't!
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
19 Oct
It was that way with teachers too . . . some were interesting, others were boring !
1 person likes this
• Toronto, Ontario
20 Oct
@much2say True and in the end you just wanted 3:30 pm to come---lol!
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
20 Oct
@MarymargII Quite often it was that way with work too !
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (50691)
• United Kingdom
19 Oct
I was bored with all the academic stuff, just loved the sports.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
19 Oct
@jaboUK Ah, through your stories I know you were the athletic type! Kids here don't have as much physical education anymore . . . at least in our school the kids only have structured exercise time maybe once or twice a week - isn't that crazy? That's why we look outside of school for sports stuff. Good to see you . . . are you back???
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (50691)
• United Kingdom
19 Oct
@much2say Yes, I'm back. That surprises me that the children don't do much sport at school, their bodies need to develop as well as their minds.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
19 Oct
@jaboUK They've pushed out the "extras" out so kids can focus on academics - isn't that terrible? We are barely clinging on to art and music as it is too. Well welcome back . . . I hope you've been well!! We missed you !
1 person likes this
• Otis Orchards, Washington
6 Oct
Most of the time I was bored out of my mind. When I went into geometry without taking algebra I found it very interesting. One year a friend of mine challenged me to see who could get a better grade in math. Now I was excited and both our grades went up. I came to the conclusion (after I got out of high school) that I didn't feel challenged in school therefore it was boring.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
8 Oct
Now that was a good challenge to boost up your grades! I didn't do well in geometry and had to take it over during the summer. For some reason the summer teacher made geometry sound so much easier - I actually aced it and got an A! I know I was bored, but now I could say I was a bit lazy . . . I probably could have done better if I put in more effort.
1 person likes this
• Otis Orchards, Washington
8 Oct
@much2say The things we realize once we are out of school.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
11 Oct
@RichardMeister As they say, youth is wasted on the youth!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (101028)
• Bunbury, Australia
28 Oct
Mostly I was a good student and tried to do my best.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
28 Oct
I'd like to think that of myself . . . but I know I could have been a better student .
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (101028)
• Bunbury, Australia
29 Oct
@much2say My school report almost always said I was 'conscientious'. I would have got into a lot of trouble at home if I had a bad report as in behaviour, not so much marks although I mostly had good marks too.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
29 Oct
@JudyEv I was a quiet kid anyway, but I know what you mean - I would have gotten in big trouble too if the school said anything about behavior issues. I didn't really have to study hard until math in 6th grade hit me . . . it started getting difficult for me . . . and then I had to worry about grades .
@cindiowens (3929)
• North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
11 Oct
Mostly, I think I was bored. Not sure what I thought I was missing on the outside though. It's not like we had the technology and toys that we have now. When I went to college, later in life, I knew I had to listen intently and study hard because it was costing me a lot of money.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
11 Oct
When we were kids, I think we just wanted to play and we could be super creative about it. Seems like technology and toys have replaced some of that good old fashioned fun. Knowing what I know now, I actually think I would do tons better if I went back to school now . . . oh I was a bit lazy back then.
1 person likes this
• North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
11 Oct
@much2say Too bad we can't live life backwards, huh?
1 person likes this
@much2say (35431)
• United States
11 Oct
@cindiowens Totally!
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@Kandae11 (27042)
6 Oct
I liked being in school - but I didn't like the long walk home.
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@much2say (35431)
• United States
6 Oct
How long of a walk did you have? My mom always picked me up . . . but I loved the days when I was allowed to walk to school. I couldn't wait for school to end the day so I could walk home (I guess I felt like a big girl or at least independent).
1 person likes this
@Kandae11 (27042)
6 Oct
@much2say That was so many years ago, I can't be sure, but I know I hated it- especially when the sun was hot. Of course, there was nothing to fear in those days - crime was very minimal.
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@much2say (35431)
• United States
6 Oct
@Kandae11 That's true. These days, at least out here, you don't see many (young) kids actually walking to school anymore . . . crime and crazy drivers are abundant here!
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