Worst Ride: Part Two

@UncleJoe (9964)
Virginia Beach, Virginia
October 7, 2017 2:46pm CST
BE SURE TO READ PART ONE BEFORE TRYING TO UNDERSTAND THIS POST. By 10:00AM the rain had stopped and the sun shone brightly on the day. I noticed that the temperature had dropped considerably but that didn’t bother me as long as the sun was shining. I often wore two sets of insulated coveralls in Winter so I rarely got cold while riding. Being almost unbearable to stay in my empty house I opted to ride to my brother’s home in Moyock, NC, a distance of a mere 40-45 miles. No challenge at all for an experienced motorcyclist. I had ridden trips over 300 miles long. Unfortunately, my brother wasn’t at home but had gone to Va. Beach on business. I obviously missed him along the road. Even though I didn’t know when I could pay him back, I knew I could easily borrow $20 from him just to keep going for a few day. As I sat in their warm kitchen having coffee with my sister-in-law while waiting I glanced out the window and got the shock of my life. It was SNOWING! The previous two Winter’s when I was in college, I managed to ride the 5 miles to school and back when it snowed. That could only be managed by keeping my boots on the ground and skiing very slowly down the road, which wasn’t as easy as it sounds. Once, when I wasn’t aware that my front brake caliper was frozen and the front wheel wasn’t turning I dumped it at the first turn. My windshield and full-face helmet had blocked my view of the tire. That was the first thing that came to mind when I saw the snow. 40 miles would seem like 4,000 miles riding on a slippery surface. But, I HAD to get home before it began sticking to the roadway. Too late. I had not gotten a mile before I was forced to slow and put my feet down. The only blessing was that there wasn’t much traffic on those back roads. Although the ride lasted so long, I made it safely back to Virginis Beach. Crossing the city was no problem even though the accumulation was getting deeper. People in cars tended to creep along as slowly as me. Yet all the while, I dreaded one particular challenge. Just a couple of miles from home, my route took me across the old humpbacked Lesner’s Bridge that spans Lynnhaven Inlet. To my left was the Lynnhaven River. On the right, the great open expanse of the Chesapeake Bay. With temperatures well below freezing and gust blowing off the Bay, I knew before I got there how hazardous crossing it on 2-wheels would be, but I had no choice. Playing it smart, (if you want to call it that.), I pulled over just past the stoplight at the bottom of the bridge. When the red light stopped traffic I eased onto the icy span and inched my way to the top. Just as I made the crest, I saw in my mirrors that the light had turned green and traffic was approaching much faster than I could move, but I had to “stand my ground” and hope for the best going down the other side THAT was when it got scary. Three different times, gusts from the Bay on my right slammed me into the struggling van on my left. The third time I felt it begin to slip from under and down toward the truck’s rear wheel. It was at that instant that I realized that I only THOUGHT I had lost my will to live after losing my family but I was wrong so I fought for control. By that time we had reached the bottom of the bridge where salted pavement was still exposed and the big Honda righted itself. Needless to say, my whole attitude had been changed in that instant. My life wasn’t over so I had to make the best of it and go on. I lived in hope for a long time that my family would come back but they never did. Not as a family, anyway. My boys came back after they were grown and we have renewed our relationships. I haven’t seen my daughter since she was 15, (she’s 44 now) because she is afraid her Baptist preacher father will not approve of her gay lifestyle. That’s not true and I am sorry she feels that way. No one can know the heartache another suffers unless they have experienced the same. And though it may sound crazy to you, I know that I would willingly suffer that all over again if I knew I was going to end up with my Beloved Becky. God sent her to heal all my hurt.
7 people like this
5 responses
@kobesbuddy (46687)
• East Tawas, Michigan
7 Oct
Beautiful story, a little bit frightening at first. I wanted to give up living, after the breakup of my family. For 11 years, I struggled as a single, divorced mother of two little children. Then, I met Jay in a Pentecostal Church and we were good friends, for about two years. God has given me a second chance, at happiness! I've been re-married now, for 27 years.
4 people like this
• Jacksonville, Florida
7 Oct
I'm sorry for all you went through. =( I cant imagine the pain you felt. I am so glad you found Becky, and your happy.
3 people like this
@Platespinner (16520)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
7 Oct
Sometimes the most distressing journeys really are worth the end destination.
2 people like this
@Kandae11 (37123)
7 Oct
Becky was the light at the end of a dark tunnel.
2 people like this
@Ithink (10673)
• United States
8 Oct
Awww thru all the pain and wanting to quit, you realized in the end you wanted to live and then found the woman for you. Becky is a very lucky woman and you are a very lucky man.
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (9964)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
8 Oct
We know that @Ithink We count our Blessings every day for each other.
1 person likes this