Your, You're, and Other Grammatical Bloopers

@Raelove (15117)
Saco, Maine
October 16, 2017 7:35am CST
At the risk of sounding authoritative and smart-alecky, I will attempt to gently (notice I said "gently") point out a couple of instances of incorrect word usage. I see it a lot no matter what I'm reading...something in print or here online, and I think it bears mentioning, because I am sure that most people would appreciate a chance to improve their writing and make it more pleasurable to read. The first is the use of the word "your." As in, I hope "your" doing OK, or I hope "your" feeling better, which are both incorrect. The correct word here would be what is known as a conjunction: "you're," which is short for "you are." "Your" is the possessive pronoun used in the second person, as in "your house, or "your cat," as opposed to "my house" or "my cat." Another stickler is the phrase that contains the words "should" or "would." They're known in the world of grammar as "modal verbs," because they are always followed by a past participle verb. Here's an example: I "should" have taken the bus. And here's where the problem lies: many people state it as "should of," which is incorrect, as "of" is a preposition, not a verb. In other words, you can "have" something, but you cannot "of" something. I have a friend who uses "of" all the time. When I mentioned it one day, he said it's because it sounds a lot like the conjunction "should've," which is a shortened version of "should have." He thanked me for correcting him, thank God! Pointing these things out doesn't always have, shall I say, the best outcome! So I hope this clears those two issues up for people who, like me, have sometimes made those errors. There are a few other grammatical sticky points that we often have to stop and think about, but I'll leave it at these two today! Happy writing, everyone! And I hope "you're" having as much fun as I am! (Public Domain Image)
20 people like this
22 responses
@Juliaacv (22060)
• Canada
16 Oct
Your, and you're are often mixed up even with those of us who are English. I think a lot of it stems back to our classroom days. Another word often used incorrectly is their, there and they're. But I'm sure that you've noticed that as well.
7 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
Yes, I have. These are the sticky points that make English a hard language to learn for some.
3 people like this
@Juliaacv (22060)
• Canada
16 Oct
@Raelove Hard to learn for some and hard to maintain for others, spoken and written forms differ so much.
2 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
17 Oct
@Juliaacv Yes, they do, which makes it a real challenge.
1 person likes this
@Dena91 (3607)
• United States
16 Oct
I always loved English when I was in school. I remember the teachers impressing these lessons on us. I read mistakes a lot as well. I try not to make them, though I am sure I am guilty at times. It's a good refresher, thanks for sharing. Have a blessed day
3 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
Thanks...it's all about helping each other out. And I get tired of hearing how these things are no longer important. As any book or newspaper editor will tell you, yes they are. It's why they hire editors and proofreaders. And SOMEONE has to know how to spell and use proper language to be able to develop spelling and grammar checkers.
1 person likes this
@Dena91 (3607)
• United States
16 Oct
@Raelove One of my struggles is using then and than properly. I usually go to one of my grammar sights to refresh my memory.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
@Dena91 I often do a typo with those, because I do know the difference.
1 person likes this
@sabtraversa (9810)
• Italy
16 Oct
Your right. And duty. At school we're taught more grammar than lexicon or pronunciation; most of the time, if I make a grammar mistake, that's because I read or heard it from a native speaker before.
3 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
There is also local dialect to be taken into consideration, as many countries' language vary by town and culture.
2 people like this
@hereandthere (23031)
• Philippines
16 Oct
i'm non-native. errors in using your/you're and there/their/they're are easier for me to let slide than those using a sound-alike word but have a different meaning. ex. threw/through, shown/shone. maybe the reason we avoid writing should of/would of is because we pronounce should've and would've with an 'ev' sound.
3 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
I did say that in the article, where I mention correcting my friend for his use of "of," instead of "have."
1 person likes this
• Philippines
16 Oct
That no longer matters to me since I stop working in the call center and my cousin who mostly speak English doesn't mind.
2 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
It will always matter to me, as I like to keep learning and improving.
3 people like this
@marlina (60772)
• Canada
16 Oct
@Raelove It does matter to me too. I try my best to write properly.
3 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
@marlina Thank you. It's sad when people say they don't care or something doesn't matter. I prefer to think of them as challenges.
2 people like this
@Lertka (348)
• Ukraine
16 Oct
I'm just learning English. Yes, I agree and I have many mistakes. I try to make no mistakes.
2 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
The thing is, like anything else we are just learning, to ask for help. Nothing wrong with that at all.
1 person likes this
@Lertka (348)
• Ukraine
16 Oct
@Raelove Correctly. I came here to communicate and learn the language.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
@Lertka Good for you.
1 person likes this
• Mombasa, Kenya
21 Oct
Thanks dear, I appreciate
2 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
21 Oct
You are welcome, Joan.
1 person likes this
• Mombasa, Kenya
22 Oct
2 people like this
@m_audrey6788 (10351)
• Germany
16 Oct
It helps me understand about it more. Thanks for this educational discussion
2 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
You're welcome. Glad I was able to help. English is one of the most complicated languages to learn.
1 person likes this
• Germany
16 Oct
@Raelove I agree
1 person likes this
@thelme55 (11427)
• Germany
16 Oct
I know that is why I tried my best to be right in grammatic. You´re right. I have seen that mistake not only from those who are from none English speaking countries but also from English speaking countries members of Mylot.
2 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
Anyone can make mistakes, and English speaking people make just as many as those just learning the language.
2 people like this
@Kosgey (1224)
16 Oct
Thank you very much for your correction.I use "you are"so much in my writing but now on I will improve my Writting.
2 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
"You are" is actually correct, as it's the full form of "you're." (You and are, abbreviated). You're doing OK.
@sharon6345 (106273)
• United States
16 Oct
i often make that mistake. I see someone make a whole row of errors. I can't help but leave the post.
2 people like this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
It does make some posts less enjoyable to read.
@ridingbet (36366)
• Philippines
17 Oct
right on that. i sometimes rectify others' grammatical errors in my mind and i would not tell them straightforward because they might get offended. i too commit errors but as soon as i read my mistakes, i edit them and put the right ones.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
17 Oct
Thanks...I don't mind it when someone corrects me, as long as it's done nicely and without embarassing me. If others get offended, then maybe there is some truth to it and they just don't like being corrected. I'd rather know when I'm doing something wrong and have the chance to correct it than not.
1 person likes this
@ridingbet (36366)
• Philippines
17 Oct
@Raelove just last week, somebody corrected my grammar. i would appreciate it more but the user's comment was way too erroneous than my discussion, and what would you expect? i retaliated and then he responded saying 'i should go ahead with my bad grammar'. even now, he has more grammatical errors than me; now i blocked him. i wouldn't want to be continuously corrected by somebody who is having more errors than me.
1 person likes this
@ridingbet (36366)
• Philippines
20 Oct
@Raelove that person who corrected me, of all people, is also a fellow countryman, and he thought so highly of himself and never accepted his own errors in grammar. i like to learn and be corrected but there should be respect when correcting others. this is one of my purposes in joining this site. i learn so much from others, and i imbibe anything new to me. it is not good to flaunt on one's "superiority" about the English language because he is not a native English speaker like me.
1 person likes this
@josie_ (4470)
• Philippines
17 Oct
English is not my native tongue so it's always nice to learn something about the language. Grammar was never my strong suit even during my school days. BTW, is it permissible to omit the word "that" in the sentence " because I am sure that most people would appreciate a chance...."?
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
17 Oct
A newspaper editor I worked for hated the use of the word "that." She said it was overused and cluttered up the writing. So in your sentence, it would have been fine if you HAD dropped it, as it reads well either way. So it is permissible, as long as it doesn't change the meaning of the sentence or phrase.
1 person likes this
@josie_ (4470)
• Philippines
17 Oct
@Raelove _Thanks. Actually the sentence is from your discussion above.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
17 Oct
@josie_ Yes, I saw that. My old editor would get a kick out of this, as I was one of her worst offenders!
1 person likes this
@sol_cee (13166)
• Japan
17 Oct
A guy would surely have me at his proper use of you’re. ;)
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
17 Oct
Now, that's the spirit!!!
• United States
17 Oct
There are times when it is so painful to read a post when there are so many spelling or grammatical errors. I understand a typo, it happens.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
17 Oct
They sure do. I am forever going back over and over what I write. It's a learning process.
1 person likes this
• Nairobi, Kenya
17 Oct
That's so me, though what confuses me a lot is "this or these" 'there or their" oh lovely english seems simple but yet keeps you learning.
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (8071)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
17 Oct
I understand that but I still get confused with the tenses, like "Should have" and "should haven't".
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (90189)
• Marion, Kansas
17 Oct
I made my sister angry when I would correct her (I was nine years younger and did it in front of her friends). Now, alas, I may find myself going where I never should HAVE gone in the past.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
17 Oct
Well, I don't think my post was rude. It was intended to help. But different people take things differently, with some more sensitive than others. So be it.
@Corbin5 (78663)
• United States
16 Oct
I am having fun. Very helpful post for many who struggle with those grammatical issues. English is hard!!!
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
Yes it sure is. But learning IS fun, so there you have it!
1 person likes this
@RasmaSandra (12494)
• Riga, Latvia
16 Oct
I have often made mistakes with all of those you combinations and have had to make quick corrections.
1 person likes this
@Raelove (15117)
• Saco, Maine
16 Oct
You're doing fine if you do notice them and correct them.
1 person likes this