Shoe()string?

By pgn
@pgntwo (21769)
Derry, Northern Ireland
November 18, 2017 4:48pm CST
"Hang on a sec, I just need to get..."... There they are, a pair of laces for my shoes. Black. Round. 5 pairs of eyelets, or 75cm (almost 30"). Price: £1.50. HOW MUCH? £1.50. For two thin bits of braided nylon, with a clear, acrylic aglet at each end. So much for the economies of mass-production scale! And so much for "living on a shoestring"... Still, no laces, no shoes. Pay up or go barefoot... Here's how laces are braided (tediously!) before waxing, cutting and tipping:
Amazing 1870 shoelace braiding machine at the City Museum in St. Louis.
10 people like this
11 responses
@rebelann (32523)
• El Paso, Texas
19 Nov
That was kinda interestin, I'm just glad none of my shoes require laces.
3 people like this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
19 Nov
Can't escape them here, otherwise the water gets in...
2 people like this
@rebelann (32523)
• El Paso, Texas
19 Nov
I'm surprised @pgntwo I would think people there would have rain boots
2 people like this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
19 Nov
@rebelann Rain boots, or wellies, tend to keep the sweat in too - becoming almost as wet on the inside as on the outside after a while. Can't beat a good pair of lace-up breathable walking boots... just so long as you don't need new laces.
2 people like this
@MALUSE (33004)
• Denmark
18 Nov
Do you watch this to get tired when you can't fall asleep?
3 people like this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
18 Nov
It is very rhythmic, I may try that next time I've had coffee too late and cannot get to sleep...
2 people like this
@JudyEv (101181)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Nov
I learnt a new word - aglet. Now all I have to do is remember it. Heaven knows when I'll ever need it but who knows?
2 people like this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
19 Nov
The joys of playing Scrabble as a kid. And, occasionally, the UK TV Show, QI.
February 23: On this day in 1886, the first samples of aluminium were made. For more visit http://qi.com From QI Series C, Episode 08
2 people like this
@JudyEv (101181)
• Bunbury, Australia
19 Nov
Is that where you learnt aglet? Playing Scrabble? That's pretty cool. I used to read through all the 'q' and 'z' words in my Scrabble dictionary hoping some of them would pop up when I needed them.
2 people like this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
19 Nov
@JudyEv The shorter words are handy, to bridge two longer words. Haven't played it in years.
2 people like this
• Rochester, New York
19 Nov
We sell shoe laces at my work for 99 cents. lol
2 people like this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
19 Nov
A bargain! I certainly expected to pay no more than about 80p. Shocking.
1 person likes this
@DaddyEvil (22415)
• United States
19 Nov
I suppose you could always leave your laces out of the shoes, pgn... You just slip your feet in and "skuff" your way along... At least, that is how many young people do it here. It looks uncomfortable. I can't see how they walk through thick mud without the shoes being sucked under, either. SMH! If you decide to try it, please let me know how long it takes you to find and "rescue' your shoes.
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
20 Nov
I was brought up in a country where flip-flops were commonplace. I cannot count the number of times I must have connected with some solid object, as a result both little toes have been "broken" a number of times as they had no protection. These days, I wear normal-looking shoes, but ones with a steel toecap, reínforced shank and non-slip sole. I take no chances. Makes getting through airport security an alarming experience...
1 person likes this
@DaddyEvil (22415)
• United States
24 Nov
@pgntwo Oh, wow! I've either been barefoot (child through early twenties) or wearing flip-flops/sandals (early twenties to present) but have never broken any toes. I did break a metatarsal when I was 10. One of our horses stepped on my bare foot. (That was pleasurable, to say the least! Well, it was pleasurable to the rest of my family and the horse... Not so much for me, though... I would still be willing to swear that horse and different members of my family whispered to each other when they saw me walking past them, making fun of me for letting the horse step on my bare foot!) In the house, I still go barefoot. Outside, weather permitting, I wear sandals or flip-flops. For work, I wear a dress shoe and can't wait to kick them off once I am off work again. Edit to add: Your comment about breaking both your little toes brings to mind a conversation I had a long time ago with @just4him. She told me she had trouble wearing shoes because she broke her little toes so much without having them "set" that they stick out 90 degrees from her feet. IDK if she was teasing me or not. Hopefully, she will comment here and let us know.
1 person likes this
@just4him (92422)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
24 Nov
@DaddyEvil Not teasing. It happened every time I was pregnant. I would catch my little toe on the coffee table leg. Those poor toes were really a mess, and yes, stick out at about a 90 degree angle. Having shoes on does bring the one on my left in where it belongs. Then a few years ago in another freak accident involving my toes, but not a coffee table, and definitely not pregnant either, I broke the right one again. This time, being the fall to winter time of year, I kept my foot inside a tight pair of shoes. At least it felt tight for that broken toe, and that one is now fixed and not sticking out like the left one still does. I'm sorry a horse stepped on your bare foot. I'm sure that hurt a lot.
2 people like this
• Derby, England
6 Dec
I have changed my laces for those with elastic and a toggle as thy don't keep coming undone
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
6 Dec
That's quite a good idea, I have seen similar on my child's shoes.
• Derby, England
6 Dec
@pgntwo They are brilliant and saves constantly re tying the laces
1 person likes this
@just4him (92422)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
24 Nov
That seems a bit much for shoelaces. Interesting how they do that.
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
24 Nov
You could say they have us by the short and curlies, but most laces are long and straight...
1 person likes this
@just4him (92422)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
24 Nov
@pgntwo Yes, they are.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (50778)
• United Kingdom
18 Nov
Coincidentally I bought some for my husband's shoes today - yes they were £1.50.
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
18 Nov
It's a stitch (or lace?) up, isn't it?
2 people like this
@jaboUK (50778)
• United Kingdom
19 Nov
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (8618)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
6 Dec
That machine resembles square dancers. LOL
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
6 Dec
Yes, it does. Soporific, in a way.
1 person likes this
@YrNemo (8744)
25 Nov
I thought the same when I had to pay almost US $10 for a set of about a metre long shoelaces for my husband's shoes. Expensive stuff.
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
25 Nov
Grossly, yes.
1 person likes this
@ridingbet (38129)
• Philippines
19 Nov
my pair of white shoes have shoestrings, but i think these strings can be bought in a cheaper price than the 1.50 pounds.
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
19 Nov
I remember them being cheaper too. Strange.
1 person likes this
@ridingbet (38129)
• Philippines
21 Nov
@pgntwo maybe the shoelaces are branded? like LV or Hermes? hahaha!
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (21769)
• Derry, Northern Ireland
21 Nov
@ridingbet Nope. Kiwi is a popular shoe care brand, here are the laces they make...