Black Is the New Greedy

@Raelove (16813)
Saco, Maine
November 24, 2017 7:10am CST
For those who have never heard, or understand the concept, of Black Friday, it's come to be an unofficial American institution during which people flock to stores as early as they open after Thanksgiving to buy things they really don't need at prices that are not really bargains. I've heard all the cutesy reasons that people, and adults at that, give for participating in this madness, the more common being "We do it for the kids." Is this what the spirit of Christmas giving has become? If so, then shame on us as a species for insulting our own intelligences and making big businesses even richer than they already are. I just read yet another front-page article in one of our larger local newspapers about the event, and it offered a few hints of hope in that a few stores opted out of the practice this year, while others chose not to open as early. In past years, some of those stores opened at 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving. This year, they moved that back to midnight, and some to 6 a.m. today. While those are small consolations, they do point to a growing dislike for this so-called tradition. And in this one instance, I can honestly say that I'm thankful to online retailers like Amazon for being one reason why retail sales are down in some areas. This article went on to interview one mother who said that her 12-year-old daughter spends all day on Thanksgiving planning for Black Friday. When asked for a quote, the woman said, "She (the daughter) just brought the first load to the car." The first load? Does anyone need that much stuff? And is that kind of greed now an accepted way of life? It disgusts me that it has come to this. The other day, some new pundit stated that, if the Senate and Congress do succeed in passing the tax reform bill by Christmas, it will put more money into the pockets of hard-working middle class Americans. Who are they fooling? That money won't stay in those pockets long, not with the greed epidemic we have going on here. Like the old saying goes, "A fool and his money are soon parted." Apparently, society, at least here in the U.S., is made up of quite a few. (Public Domain Image)
10 people like this
11 responses
@Kandae11 (37077)
24 Nov
A few years ago , a staff member in one of the big department stores was killed by the stampede of greed.
4 people like this
• Germany
24 Nov
Oh gosh!
1 person likes this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
Stampede of greed...that pretty much sums it up.
3 people like this
@Daelii (5634)
• United States
24 Nov
More than just one person has been murdered/killed as a result of people stampeding through to sales.
3 people like this
@JohnRoberts (57185)
• Los Angeles, California
24 Nov
The day after Thanksgiving was always the start of the Christmas shopping season but this Black Friday (and add Cyber Monday) madness is a recent phenomenon within the past 20 years or so. It has been promoted and built into this.
4 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
That's right. I remember being excited about shopping after Thanksgiving. But my parents were not affluent, and surprise, surprise, they were perfectly capable of keeping us in line as well, which seems to be yet another lost art.
2 people like this
@sharon6345 (126013)
• United States
24 Nov
I dont think it's all that bad if you saved fo that one day to get sales. I did it once and bought nothing but the store was filled with bargains. I am not a mall shopper to be honest. I like packages at the door.
3 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
It's ok if you find deals on what you need. Nothing wrong with that. But I know many people who buy things they don't need and then get rid of them not long after. That makes no sense to me.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123440)
• Bunbury, Australia
24 Nov
You are so right about the greed associated with Black Friday. As your sign says, if you buy nothing, you will save heaps. But people seem to think they need more and more material goods.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
Sadly, I know many people who fit that description. I don't know what it's all about!
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123440)
• Bunbury, Australia
24 Nov
@Raelove It is just crazy to me. We have a lovely niece with three children and you can barely get into the bedrooms for all the toys. The lounge is also full of toys. They could start their own toyshop if they felt so inclined. I just shake my head in wonder.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
@JudyEv My sister raised her two girls the same way. One day, I mentioned to THEM, not her, that they should remember poor children and give some of their many toys away. Not long after that, the toy supply thinned down a bit. Maybe Mom overheard that conversation...I like to think so.
2 people like this
@redurnet (1484)
• United Kingdom
24 Nov
I think people buy so much things that they THINK they need because they've been convinced of this by brands or because they really just want to satisfy their own ego.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
Well it doesn't say much for their self-control or their ability to make good choices.
2 people like this
@redurnet (1484)
• United Kingdom
24 Nov
@Raelove No, it doesn't. I think lots of people look around and see what others are getting and think they need to have as much too. I remember a few years ago in the UK we had lots of riots where people just went mad with greed and started smashing in all of the store fronts in London and stealing all of the expensive goods. They didn't need them - these people weren't starving or living on the streets. Many arrested had no previous criminal records. I think the actor Russell Brand explains it well when he says that many people in Western civilization have adopted capitalism as a religion, and are now worshiping goods of a high monetary value like Gods, believing they have spiritual worth.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
@redurnet That's a pretty accurate assessment. Materialism in developed countries is rampant, and we have no one to blame but ourselves. It's the job of big business to throw us a line, but it's left up to us whether we'll bite or not.
1 person likes this
• Ponce De Leon, Florida
24 Nov
I will be shopping black Friday as I do every year for Christmas presents. I don't see the big deal about people wanting to get good deals..
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
I have no problem with getting deals if you can get them. But I see many who overspend just because the prices are low. It never makes sense to buy something you don't need just because the price is right, as it is still a waste of money.
2 people like this
@Daelii (5634)
• United States
24 Nov
@Raelove There are a few good deals out there for black Friday, but most make the mistake to think they really are good deals. The stores will gradually increase the prices to get to Christmas; then the price drop for a black Friday sale add seems great. in reality, its not, and that same deal or better can be earned by using coupons or shopping sales at other times during the year. The last item I was debating to buy for black friday. The craft store here has the embroidery thread for an average selling price of 52 cents a piece. The price is too low to list in the add. So I called, the selling price is 33 cents. Not to bad if you think about it, you do save money compared to the shelf price. Except, wallmart sells the same exact thing for 40 cents. Wal-mart usually sells them on sale for 20 cents. And that store usually sells them for 4 for a dollar (so each price is 25 cents in that sale). So the black friday sale day isn't a deal compared to shopping at that store when it has that item on regular sale. This kind of math can easily be done with most things.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
@Daelii You are correct. Having worked in retail myself, I can vouch for the fact that there are not many real deals going on. Part of marketing is to lure people in with one or two blockbusters, and that gets them into the stores. The other part is to keep people in the store by displaying certain items in certain places to convince them to think that they need those things when they really don't. I took some financial workshops a few years ago, and the mantra in all of them was this: Do I need this item or do I just want it? I am as guilty as the next person of buying things I did not need just because it felt good at the time. I've moved 3 times in 5 years, and I gave away or tossed a lot of those things. Live and learn.
2 people like this
@m_audrey6788 (13622)
• Germany
24 Nov
I strongly agree with you I hope everyone will not be acting like there will be no tomorrow
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
I stay right out of it myself. I like to think I use my brains for something worthwhile...
2 people like this
• Germany
24 Nov
@Raelove Yes me too
1 person likes this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
1 person likes this
@Daelii (5634)
• United States
24 Nov
what 12 year old should be planning her shopping list for herself for christmas? I love my kids and they can help pick and plan dinners. I even ask for a general list of what they would really like for christmas,, as in a letter to santa. But I am definitely picking what they get and keeping it as a surprise.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
24 Nov
That is how it should be. But there's always that "trendy" permissive parent out there who coddles their kids, and that seems to be who they always interview, like this is something to be proud of.
2 people like this
@Daelii (5634)
• United States
24 Nov
@Raelove True. I did get some help from my kids on picking out gifts for other people. So I really hope that is the case for that family. As in teaching kids to give and share is a good thing.. but its just my personal choice to do that kind of thing all year round and not rely on one day of adds/supposed sales to be what motivates gifts to people. I'd rather spend some time searching for something that might actually be useful and meaningful to the person. If it happens to be an on sale item then woohoo! I remember sitting with some kids and their parents and they had opened up their gifts from people. They actually totaled up the price of each item to make sure the same amount of money was spent equally and if there was an issue in sale price / or they thought more was spent on another kid, they wanted cash to make it "Fair". That totally ruined the gift giving experience to them, so then the next year I had just made a collective gift to the whole family... to avoid that kind of headache.
1 person likes this
@crafty01 (338)
• Jamshedpur, India
25 Nov
"A fool and his money are soon parted." so true.
2 people like this
@Raelove (16813)
• Saco, Maine
25 Nov
Yes it is. And Big Business depends on there being lots of them out there.
2 people like this
@allen0187 (33124)
• Philippines
25 Nov
We do not have a Black Friday and Cyber Monday here in the Philippines but online retailers have adapted it and people do look forward to it. I remember an old adage, 'People buy stuff that they don't need, spending money that they do not have to impress people that they do not like.' That has what the world has come to in the past couple of years.
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (118276)
• Boise, Idaho
25 Nov
Some people have to live like that I suppose. Money and stuff is all important to them.
1 person likes this