Armstrong steering, hungry boards and dollies

@JudyEv (123435)
Bunbury, Australia
November 25, 2017 7:20pm CST
Yesterday we went to a food and wine festival in our local town. We enjoyed a wine and some lunch then came home for a few hours before going back to help a friend to pack up her wine stand. Her husband has left her for someone else and she is trying to run a vineyard and winery on her own. We offered to pack up the small marquee affair as she had another function to run back at the vineyard. We packed the marquee and various other bits and pieces into her old work utility. It has what we call ‘Armstrong steering’ meaning that it doesn’t have power steering so is very heavy to steer particularly at a slow speed in a restricted space. Hence you need strong arms to drive it. Armstrong steering made me think of ‘hungry boards’ which are boards put round the top of grain bins on trucks to enable the farmer to add a few extra kilos or pounds. I guess the term came about through farmers being greedy to add extra to their loads. And hungry boards reminded me of ‘dollies’ which a name sometimes given to the trailer towed behind a big truck, I guess much like a child would tow their doll along behind them. Isn’t it interesting how these unusual terms come about?
21 people like this
22 responses
@teamfreak16 (41181)
• Colorado Springs, Colorado
26 Nov
Interesting. Here a dolly is used to be able to wheel a heavy load from point A to point B
8 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
I think we might call that a dolly too - or sometimes a sack truck or sack trolley.
3 people like this
@maezee (32281)
• United States
26 Nov
I cant imagine how hard that would be to drive. Why is it called Armstrong I wonder?
5 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
The Armstrong bit is a joke meaning you need strong arms to steer it.
1 person likes this
@TRBRocks420 (77698)
• Banks, Oregon
26 Nov
Very unusual & nice pick up.
5 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
They call the pick up Rosie. We call these sorts of vehicles 'utilities'.
1 person likes this
@valmnz (12758)
• New Zealand
26 Nov
They're all new terms to me. Are they Oz-speak, or do others know about them?
4 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
Some have heard of one or other of the term but I think 'hungry boards' might be Oz-speak.
1 person likes this
@just4him (117272)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
26 Nov
It really is. Thanks for teaching me something new today.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
You're welcome. There seems a lot to learn sometimes, doesn't there?
1 person likes this
@just4him (117272)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
26 Nov
@JudyEv Yes, but it's always enjoyable to learn something new.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (50685)
• United States
26 Nov
I used to own an armstrong! We call hungry boards, side boards. and dollies are dollies!
3 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
By 'armstrong' do you mean a vehicle without power steering?
@Platespinner (16520)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
26 Nov
I've driven without power steering. The armstrong adjective is definitely accurate!
3 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
Vince reckoned you needed half an acre to turn the thing around. Didn't have a good turning circle by any means.
@LadyDuck (157723)
• Switzerland
26 Nov
I have read those terms, but never paid attention or spent time searching their meaning.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
I can't always be bothered researching stuff either.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157723)
• Switzerland
26 Nov
@JudyEv Sometimes I am curious and I check, but not always I have enough time to spend online.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
@LadyDuck I am much the same. I don't always open the links either. Just a few of the music ones but not always.
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
26 Nov
Yes, it is. I have heard of and used "armstrong steering" and have seen those "hungry boards" on trucks, though I am not sure what they are called here. Dollies here are those things that you stack boxes on in order to tilt is back and move a large load. The word may be used for trailers too though.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
And someone has commented on the 'pick up' which we call a ute (short for utility). More differences!
1 person likes this
• Eugene, Oregon
26 Nov
@JudyEv Oh yes, so that is a "ute," Interesting differences. A neighbor of mine in his 80s just recently spent three weeks visiting an old"mate" there who is ill. Might have been in Adelaide. I will have to ask him. He was once there on a teacher exchange.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
@JamesHxstatic Adelaide is a nice city. A bit like Perth in being more laidback and not so frantically busy like the larger Sydney and Melbourne. It's sometimes called the city of churches.
1 person likes this
@Shavkat (62709)
• Philippines
26 Nov
It looks cool to keep this type of vehicle. Does it still work?
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
Yes, it is a reliable workhorse for the vineyard.
1 person likes this
@Shavkat (62709)
• Philippines
26 Nov
@JudyEv It looks so cool to ride in this vehicle.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
@Shavkat It is pretty cool. Nothing like a nice comfortable modern car.
1 person likes this
@snowy22315 (47290)
• United States
26 Nov
Yes, it is always interesting to find out how things got their names.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
Some have some very strange origins.
1 person likes this
@snowy22315 (47290)
• United States
26 Nov
@JudyEv I guess!
@YrNemo (12664)
26 Nov
We used to drive vehicles with no power steering in the past, about 20 or more years ago, didn't we? But Armstrong steering perhaps is only applied to certain types of vehicle? (I am curious.)
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
This was apparently very heavy to steer so I don't know if it was heavier than the ones from long ago or what. The Armstrong steering is just a joke meaning that you need strong arms.
1 person likes this
@YrNemo (12664)
27 Nov
@JudyEv Get it now. It must be heavier than usual. The old steerings were heavy, but not that bad. (Re: that lady, I feel a bit sad for her, being left for another woman!)
@FayeHazel (18027)
• United States
26 Nov
I hadn't heard of hungry boards or dollies, fun story though
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
People come up with some weird names for things.
• Preston, England
26 Nov
not heard of hungry boards before - interesting
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
It's a good name for them.
1 person likes this
@yanzalong (10151)
• Indonesia
26 Nov
What if it stalled? Could we push it?
2 people like this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
26 Nov
Yes, it had gears so you'd be able to push it.
@allen0187 (33124)
• Philippines
27 Nov
Definitely interesting!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
27 Nov
I'm glad you found it so.
1 person likes this
@allen0187 (33124)
• Philippines
27 Nov
@JudyEv here in the Philippines we call it 'pawis steering' a play on 'power steering'. 'Pawis' is actually 'sweat' in our language which means that you'll likely sweat driving this kind of car.
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
28 Nov
@allen0187 That's a very apt description too. It is hard work driving a big vehicle if it doesn't have power steering.
1 person likes this
@DeborahDiane (21689)
• Laguna Woods, California
27 Nov
@JudyEv - I love these unusual terms and, when you explain them, they make perfect sense!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
27 Nov
They make sense to me. I think it is so clever how they come up with the terms.
1 person likes this
• Laguna Woods, California
27 Nov
@JudyEv - I think it is clever, too! Such fun!
1 person likes this
@averygirl72 (16656)
• Philippines
28 Nov
I learn interesting terms today but I can't still imagine how it works
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
28 Nov
Do you mean the armstrong one? If a vehicle doesn't have power steering it can be very hard to turn the steering wheel to make the wheels turn - so you need strong arms to haul the steering wheel one way or the other.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (38370)
• United States
28 Nov
I have never heard of Armstrong steering. Yes, it is funny how these words evolve.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (123435)
• Bunbury, Australia
28 Nov
Did you read @allen0187's response? In the Philippines they call it 'pawis' steering which sounds a bit like power steering but 'pawis' actually means 'sweat' so they have thought up something quite similar to 'armstrong'.
2 people like this
• United States
26 Nov
How kind of you and your husband to help her with her stand. I've used a dollies many times in moves, but it's powered by holding it and walking. I also love to learn about words--their starting points, how the meaning changes through time, and the difference the word means at different parts of the world.
1 person likes this