Beer to be made from bush tucker quandongs

@JudyEv (101133)
Bunbury, Australia
December 2, 2017 12:58am CST
An interesting snippet appeared on our West Australian news bulletin today. Six months ago there was heavy rainfall throughout our Great Southern region. This has resulted in a bumper crop of Santalum acuminatum or desert quandong (also known as the native peach). This is a hemi-parasitic plant from the sandalwood family. The plant attaches to other species but not to the detriment of the host. The quandong uses photosynthesis to obtain nourishment but also uses the root system of the host plant to acquire nutrients. Some farmers have gone into the cultivation of host trees with a view to producing quandongs at a later date. Quandong fruits are bright red with a fleshy outer covering and a hard nut in the centre. The centres were once used as Chinese checker 'men'. Because of the bumper harvest, there is one brewery attempting to make a quandong beer. Another company is experimenting with the production of gin. Quandongs are a well-known and popular bush tucker food. We travelled the Holland Track a couple of years ago and came across a quandong tree which had ripe fruit on it. We stewed some with some sugar and ate them with tinned cream. It will be interesting to see how they go with making beer and gin from the fruit. The photo shows immature fruit.
24 people like this
10 responses
• China
2 Dec
I have never seen the Quandong,which seems to be an extremely versatile plant.However I know many species in the sandalwood family are hemi-parasitic plants,for example, over here there is a herbal medine called Herba Thesii. https://tcmwiki.com/wiki/herba-thesii-longifolii
Grape Seed Extract,Stevia Extract,Cranberry Extract,Rhamnose,Silymarin is our main products,with 10 years' experience in herbal industry,mainly to Europe.
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Dec
That's interesting. Another is what is commonly known as the West Australian Christmas tree although it doesn't belong to the sandalwood group. I'll do a post on it as soon as I find my photo - or take a new one as they are flowering about now, hence the name. Its taxonomic name is Nuytsia floribunda and it is very pretty.
3 people like this
• China
3 Dec
@JudyEv It is the first I hear of Nuytsia floribunda. I can't wait to read that post.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
4 Dec
@changjiangzhibin89 We haven't managed to take a photo yet although I already have a photo somewhere. At the moment I can't find it.
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@Madshadi (4898)
• Brussels, Belgium
2 Dec
I haven't read about plants since biology class in high-school. It's a nice picture
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Dec
I did biology at school too but have forgotten a lot of it.
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@Madshadi (4898)
• Brussels, Belgium
2 Dec
@JudyEv it wasn’t really one of my favourite subjects
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
3 Dec
@Madshadi I liked English (literature) and languages rather than the maths and science subjects.
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@Platespinner (18577)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
2 Dec
I think I've just been educated! Our Chinese checker pieces were glass marbles (I think). You didn't tell us how they tasted?
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Dec
I can't really remember. They were nothing to rave about - perhaps a bit nutty. The nuts inside are all dimpled. I thought I had a photo of the nuts but I can't find it now.
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
3 Dec
@Platespinner Maybe it will.
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@YrNemo (8724)
2 Dec
A very interesting fruit! I just checked the ripen fruits, and become more curious now of them.
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Dec
They are a popular food for indigenous people.
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@YrNemo (8724)
3 Dec
@JudyEv I will have to search to see if that fruit could be found in other countries.
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
3 Dec
@YrNemo I very much doubt it but you never know.
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@ilocosboy (33293)
• Philippines
2 Dec
it looks like a guava to me, he he can it be eaten as a fruit?
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Dec
Yes, when it turns red it can be eaten as a fruit.
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@ilocosboy (33293)
• Philippines
3 Dec
Oh really, that must taste sweet
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
4 Dec
@ilocosboy Some are quite sweet but others are a bit tart.
@just4him (92365)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
2 Dec
Sounds like an interesting adventure with the fruit.
2 people like this
• Derby, England
2 Dec
I lived in Australia for thirteen years and never heard of these. I used to love watching "The Bush Tucker Man" back then.
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
4 Dec
That's interesting. Did you like Australia and whereabouts did you live?
@vandana7 (57518)
• India
2 Dec
That is interesting information. You, however, did not mention how it tastes. lol.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Dec
It's not my favourite fruit as it isn't very sweet.
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@lady1993 (15716)
• Philippines
2 Dec
Maybe when you get to taste it, you can tell us how it is
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
2 Dec
I've had it stewed and it was very nice. No particular taste that I remember but very pleasant.
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• Eugene, Oregon
3 Dec
Is the fruit sweet like peaches? I see that you stewed them. Are they not good raw?
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@JudyEv (101133)
• Bunbury, Australia
4 Dec
You can eat them raw but they're not terribly sweet. We added sugar when we cooked them.
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