Haiku For You

@MALUSE (32939)
Denmark
December 5, 2017 11:00am CST
I'm sure many more members would try to compose poems if they only knew how to find fitting end rhymes. Of course, rhymes aren't all you need. A stress pattern must also be found. All this hassle can be avoided if you decide to compose Haikus. Haikus are more than 300 years old. They were first written in Japan. They follow a rigid, but simple pattern: A Haiku poem consists of only three lines. Line 1 has five syllables. Line 2 has seven syllables. Line 3 has five syllables. It doesn't matter at all what the poem is about as long as you follow the 5-7-5 pattern. --- MyLot - a good site Pays members regularly. Many people flock here. I write this and that, Topics that interest me. Hopefully, you, too. Breakfast and weather - Utterly boring subjects At least for MALU. I never read posts On gadgets like mobile phones, Don't interest me. A few members here Love throwing dirt at others, This is called abuse. We are virtual. Some die a virtual death, Though not a real one. Many peeps rate much, Do they read before rating? I do have my doubts. The motive they have Is simply the following: They want 'tit-for-tat'. --- Composing haikus, Bah, that is easily done, Do try it yourself. Won't bore you longer, Must write another brill post. Want to earn money. Hope you enjoyed this. Don't forget: Like and comment To make me happy ! --- Photo: pixabay
15 people like this
16 responses
@topffer (30702)
• France
5 Dec
There are really no more rules to follow ? It looks a bit too simple for me who always thought that Japanese were sophisticated people.
4 people like this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
5 Dec
Simplicity can also be sophisticated.
4 people like this
@topffer (30702)
• France
5 Dec
@MALUSE You can put sophistication everywhere like that. Even Mr Jourdain was more sophisticated than he was thinking, when he was doing some prose without knowing it.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
5 Dec
@topffer A haiku should deal with profound topics like philosophical insights or pure sentiments. MyLot is certainly not a worthy subject for such a noble form. A haiku is not meant to be light and funny. --- Who is/was Jourdain? I know nothing about French literature. I learnt English and Latin at school and later studied English and Russian. I taught English, Russian and Italian at secondary grammar schools. Enough languages I think, but French was not among them.
3 people like this
@Corbin5 (81921)
• United States
5 Dec
I have made you happy!!!!
4 people like this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
5 Dec
Thank you very much!
3 people like this
@valmnz (13199)
• New Zealand
5 Dec
Well done! It is fun experimenting with different forms of poetry like that. I just responded to writing a limerick in a local magazine.
3 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
5 Dec
Yet, when reading true haikus, there is an emotion, sometimes a spiritual, not religious, aspect to good ones. I am a poet at times and prefer unrhymed poems to read and to write.
2 people like this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
5 Dec
You're right, of course. MyLot is certainly not a worthy subject for haikus. My haikus are just for fun.
4 people like this
• Eugene, Oregon
5 Dec
@MALUSE Good examples however, of the form.
2 people like this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
5 Dec
@JamesHxstatic Thank you!
2 people like this
@sishy7 (27365)
• Australia
5 Dec
I enjoyed that! I thought the rules are more complicated but 5-7-5 pattern is pretty easy to remember...
2 people like this
@CoralLevang (40884)
• United States
13 Dec
Brilliant and fun, M-L! Haiku has always been one of my favorite forms. When I write Haiku, it's usually it is much more for Spiritual understanding or topics. I enjoy writing Haiku and acrostics, because they are so focused. I have to admit, however, that I also enjoy limericks. That is usually when I am most light-hearted. Once again, you have raised a brilliant discussion, and brought a smile to my face for the lighthearted moments! You show such int'rest By making us think deeply-- Brain pow-er awaits. Saying what is meant In a short...few syllables Needed for the truth.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
13 Dec
Thank you very much for your friendly comment and the haikus.
1 person likes this
@CoralLevang (40884)
• United States
13 Dec
@MALUSE you are definitely one of my favorites. You are also inspiring me to write something else, because you make me think about some things. It will be a while before it gets posted, because I just don't have the time to work on it right now. I seem to lose time with holidays!
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
13 Dec
@CoralLevang This comment is an ego booster! :-)
1 person likes this
@Marty1 (26800)
• Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
6 Dec
I love your haikus! i used to write them but haven't in a few years. Yours are very clever!
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
6 Dec
Thank you! Why don't you start again writing poems?
1 person likes this
@Marty1 (26800)
• Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
6 Dec
@MALUSE I just thought that because after reading yours it makes me want to start again as I love all form of poetry. Do you write other forms? I want to go through firms online and learn other forms of poetry
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
6 Dec
@Marty1 No. I'm a prose person.I only ever write funny poems or parodies. I've written poems for family events, birthdays, weddings, etc.
1 person likes this
• Pamplona, Spain
5 Dec
Great Poem and I hope you write another brill post and make this day your best and very most.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
5 Dec
Thank you for this friendly comment!
2 people like this
• Pamplona, Spain
8 Dec
@MALUSE Speak soon as I have been out for a few days with so many things going on around me. Will see if you wrote anything else.
@Kandae11 (27147)
5 Dec
People love talking and reading about food.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
5 Dec
Indeed they do! What is so fascinating about the info what other people have for breakfast?
1 person likes this
@Kandae11 (27147)
5 Dec
@MALUSE I think it is because food and eating is a beloved pastime for most.
1 person likes this
@LoriAMoore (10038)
• United States
6 Dec
I like Maluse posts She makes me very happy She's a smart cookie
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
6 Dec
Goody! Thank you.
1 person likes this
@ms1864 (7001)
• Bangalore, India
6 Dec
lol, good one. I wasn't aware this format had a name. I think a few of my poetry attempts are by default in this pattern....though i am a rhymer...
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
6 Dec
Nice to see you here again. I miss your posts!
1 person likes this
• Midland, Michigan
5 Dec
I agree about the likers and don't understand them either. I thought about responding in kind, but that would take a bit and I should be heading off to work right now, so maybe I'll return with one or more later. Don't know that I've ever attempted them before. As for finding ending rhymes, I have a dictionary that has them in the back and I've come to use rhymezone online for finding them in recent years. I won't say that I've done well on meter and such, but I still make the attempt periodically.
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (32939)
• Denmark
5 Dec
Practice makes perfect! :-)
1 person likes this
@DianneN (59691)
• United States
7 Dec
Haiku poetry was the perfect venue for my special education students. Always fun to write and read.
1 person likes this
@much2say (35425)
• United States
6 Dec
myLot discussions Interaction is the key MALUSE knows a lot
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (101135)
• Bunbury, Australia
6 Dec
You're very clever composing these. What I want to know is - what makes a haiku 'great'? There are some renowned for their wonderful haiku but I can't work out why theirs are considered so great.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Dec
I didn't know the formula was only the 5-7-5 formula.I thought it was more harder than this. I like your haiku.
1 person likes this