Our Tree Is Up But Not Decorated Yet...

Canada
December 10, 2017 8:17am CST
As we drove to town yesterday (a bigger town than ours) to do some Christmas Shopping we noticed the places selling Trees were wiped out. If you don't have a tree by now in my area you need to visit a “cut your own” tree farm. We usually do that but not this year.... When I was 7 my Dad and Mom moved us out of the city and into the country. They bought a few acres in the boonies, they built their forever home and we children soon belonged to 4-H. 4-H was and is a club that is all over the world now. For country kids it was fun. You learned a lot. It was geared to country kids, the boys learned boy things like farming, gardening and lots more. We girls learned how to cook and sew, garden and other things too. One of the other things was reforestation... The state of New York was giving 4-H kids with the land to plant 1000 baby trees per kid for years. We had the land, the land we used to plant thousands of trees was part of a farm that my dad bought and eventually he bought the whole farm... Once planted we sort of forgot about them and just watched them grow. By the time I went to college, my parents were selling Christmas trees, they sold thousands over the years. It ended when the trees became too big. Now its a forest next to the forest that was the edge of our land. While living in Indiana years ago, taking my daughter to her dentist, a woman working there was talking about New York was where she grew up too and we laughed when she said her family bought thier Christmas Trees from my family.... its a small world. The photo above shows what used to be my Dad's garden, the tall trees on the left are some of the Christmas trees gone wild, the rest of the pines are the forest farthest down away from where I was standing when I took this photo. Funny isn't it, how just seeing a tree or lack of trees, can bring back wonderful memories. What is your favorite winter memory?
Learn about 4-H's rich 100-year history as the nation's larges youth development organization.
14 people like this
15 responses
@LadyDuck (176494)
• Switzerland
10 Dec
What I appreciate of your country are those big spaces that we lack here in crowded Europe. My favorite winter memory is the midnight Christmas mass, a magical moment when I was young.
5 people like this
• Canada
11 Dec
I can't even imagine not having space. I live in a small town here in Canada but we are surrounded by farms and forests. The land my dad bought in the 1950's was over 200 acres. My sister has her side of the land (in the photo) and my brother's family has the land on the other side of the road. Since I was the wanderer, who would never be living in NY again my inheritance was money.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (176494)
• Switzerland
11 Dec
@PainsOnSlate We are surrounded by vineyards, but land here is very expensive, it costs 400$ the square meter to buy free land here.
1 person likes this
• Canada
12 Dec
@LadyDuck wow, that is expensive..
1 person likes this
@Kandae11 (40370)
10 Dec
The winter memory I have is not the best one. My first visit to North America (New York to be precise) was during the winter. I ignored advice and went out in very cold temperatures unsuitably dressed.
3 people like this
• Canada
12 Dec
I grew up in NY and we knew we needed warm clothes in the winter. It must have been a uncomfortable visit! Did you catch a cold?
@amadeo (73281)
• United States
10 Dec
thank you for this bit of news there.That is a great organization
3 people like this
• Canada
12 Dec
Thanks for reading about it. 4-H is an important part of country living.
1 person likes this
@peachpurple (12770)
• Malaysia
10 Dec
that christmas tree is kind of weird in shape but looks healthy
2 people like this
• Canada
11 Dec
That was my dad's tree, he sat under it every day he was working his garden, my sister when she took over the house/land turned the garden into lawn. it is a lovely sight - except the burning bin in the back of the photo. I don't think they use it anymore, I don't think NY allows burning trash or open fires anymore.
1 person likes this
@peachpurple (12770)
• Malaysia
11 Dec
@PainsOnSlate oh your sis is staying there? well kept garden
1 person likes this
• Canada
12 Dec
@peachpurple My sister lives there now.
@shaggin (37762)
• United States
8 Jan
That is neat your family was able to sell all those trees. I buy artificial trees as I hate cutting trees down. My parents always get real trees. They cut one down here the day before Christmas. Seemed like a waste to me at that point. They planted it years ago for this reason to cut for Christmas but I would have just not put a tree up at all rather then cut it and throw it away after a few days. That is so ironic that you met someone in Indiana who used to buy trees from your parents farm in upstate Ny. Small world is right! This reminds me of post @DianneN wrote about not long ago.
2 people like this
@DianneN (85007)
• United States
9 Jan
Thank you!
2 people like this
• Canada
9 Jan
It's a small world isn't it?
1 person likes this
@nela13 (8337)
• Portugal
10 Dec
Seems a beautiful place.
2 people like this
• Canada
11 Dec
Thank you, it is a love place in the country.
1 person likes this
@CinnamonGrl (6065)
• Paradise, California
10 Dec
That is really a coincidence, that you would meet a woman in Indiana whose family bought their Christmas trees from your family. Love the photo. Hmm, I'm not sure what my favorite winter memory is. We had a lot of fun in the snow when I lived in Klamath Falls, Oregon. Lots of sledding and snowman building.
2 people like this
• Canada
12 Dec
We did the same thing growing up in upstate NY. Snowmen were everywhere and snow forts were fun. Sliding was a daily thing in the winter as a kid...
@HazySue (23054)
• United States
14 Dec
My favorite memory is going out to a tree farm for the first time with my girls when they were little and picking out a tree, cutting it down and taking it home to decorate.
1 person likes this
• Canada
15 Dec
We still do that occasionally, this year we didn't...When the children were young and still at home we did it every year... It was an adventure!
1 person likes this
@HazySue (23054)
• United States
15 Dec
@PainsOnSlate I have no children that will be here in my home this Christmas so, for me a fiber optic tree about two feet tall is enough this year.
1 person likes this
• Canada
17 Dec
@HazySue Our tree gets smaller every year too...
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (33290)
• Canada
10 Dec
I haven't noticed too many tree lots this year at all. What great memories of some of the best lessons taught in 4-H, you see, I too, was a member. I learned to bake bread, sew and embroider. Although I did some embroidery before joining, I just didn't quite know all that there was to know about making the back as neat as it could have been.
1 person likes this
• Canada
11 Dec
4H was a big thing for us kids, we had chickens and ducks, I had horses eventually and we showed all of that in the country fair. We also showed our sewing and cooking. it was good fun as a kid... I never did learn embroidery... maybe because I was a tomboy girl..
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (33290)
• Canada
12 Dec
@PainsOnSlate In my day they wouldn't allow the girls into the guy's side of the organization, so we didn't get to show any animals or do anything outside of the house.
1 person likes this
• Canada
12 Dec
@Juliaacv I think that was the way it was when I was there although I did know a few girls that had big animals, like cows and pigs, perhaps her adults made sure she got the info she needed...
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (55053)
• United Kingdom
12 Dec
Like Anna - I'm always amazed at how much space you have. Our town is surrounded by open heathland (it's used for training horses), but our own personal space is very small.
1 person likes this
@jaboUK (55053)
• United Kingdom
13 Dec
@PainsOnSlate Lovely to hear all that Marilyn, thank you.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (134917)
• Bunbury, Australia
10 Dec
We didn't have 4-H in Australia but a similar organisation called Junior Farmers. Later it changed to Rural Youth. Do you know what 4-H stands for?
1 person likes this
• Canada
12 Dec
Yes we learned the 4 H"s, head, heart, hands, and health all very important. This is the pledge we said at every meeting. I pledge my HEAD to clearer thinking, my HEART to greater loyalty, my HANDS to larger service, and my HEALTH to better living, for my club, my community, my country, and my world.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (134917)
• Bunbury, Australia
13 Dec
@PainsOnSlate That's a great pledge. I always wondered about the name - now I know. Thanks for that.
1 person likes this
• United States
15 Dec
Sounds like you had a wonderful childhood growing up in the country. We have a Christmas tree farm nearby and it always makes me feel full of Christmas spirit when I pass by. I have an artificial tree but real trees just make Christmas feel more like Christmas. I'm a bit slow getting round to posts these days but hopefully your tree is decorated now?
1 person likes this
• Canada
15 Dec
It is, it lovely...
@Ganma7 (2828)
11 Dec
Loved the story and picture. Thanks for sharing
1 person likes this
• Canada
11 Dec
Thanks for reading it, It was fun to grow up in the boonies. The funny shaped tree at the end of the grape line is / was my dad's tree, he had a chair under that tree and sat there when he took a break from his garden, It is a fond memory.
@sallypup (28535)
• Moses Lake, Washington
11 Dec
Thank you for this lovely discussion about yesteryear and trees. The forest is something I'd love to visit.
1 person likes this
• Canada
12 Dec
I love being in the woods too.
@Morleyhunt (20996)
• Canada
10 Dec
I remember one of our first Christmas trees. (Christmas trees were not part of our heritage). We had 3 glass ornaments. I thought they were breathtakingly beautiful. I was 7 years old.
1 person likes this
• Canada
12 Dec
I can understand thinking it was lovely because it was. I've never been without a tree for Christmas, it was tradition.