Truckin' in the 60's

@UncleJoe (9484)
Virginia Beach, Virginia
January 14, 2018 3:12pm CST
Fond memories of my trucking days, (and some not so fond) came to mind after reading a post by @LoriAMoore . Discussions with @TheHorse caused even more to pop up. Things were so different in those days. For one, interstate highways were mainly on paper back then. We had to rely on old, outdated roads and routes to get from “A” to “B”. A lot of them were still just 2-laned and they all continually passed through every little town with it’s share of reduced speed limits and stoplights. Those old style diesels engines could not compare in power to the big truck motors today. The only way those engines had enough torque to pull 80,000 lb down the highway was to give them a LOT of gears. Some trucks I have driven, (Particularly Mack) had so many gears that they required TWO-DIFFERENT shifters to get it up to highway speed. Every hill or incline mandated down-shifting through the gears to keep maximum torques on the drive wheels. Have you ever come up behind a rig climbing a mountain? The engine might be screaming but they are still moving. However, do yourself a favor and try not to be in front of one coming DOWN a steep grade. Inexperienced truck drivers often over heat their brakes and lose them. Nevertheless, in the 60’s due to our roads and conditions we were required to really “DRIVE” the semi compared to the more powerful Engines and roads of today. That’s why I liked this old tune.
Truckers prayer.... enjoy This is my first movie... not best....
10 people like this
8 responses
@JudyEv (119216)
• Bunbury, Australia
14 Jan
Our bus has what is known here as a 'crash' gearbox. We had someone come to look at it with a view to buying it but he couldn't drive it. He had no idea of double de-clutching. Truckers have it much easier than when you were on the roads.
4 people like this
• United States
15 Jan
Joe, this is off the topic of your post, but did you have your surgery? Hope all went well, if you did.
3 people like this
@UncleJoe (9484)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
15 Jan
@1creekgirl Yes, and thank you for asking. I had a rough couple of days but it appears to be healing well.
2 people like this
@bagarad (11481)
• Paso Robles, California
15 Jan
I'm always amazed at how anyone can actually drive those big rigs. One of my close friends drove one, and the stories he told curled my hair even more than it is already -- things like deliberately backing onto an onramp in Boston because he couldn't find the real entrance for the way he wanted to go. He says two other trucks followed him because they couldn't find it either. I hope most truckers don't do that sort of thing, or that my friend was exaggerating just to make us laugh. My uncle also drove a truck and did make up some stories just to scare us. Even carefully driven big rigs scare me when they wall me in. I know how many things can go wrong. And I would always rather be behind one than in front of one if driving downhill.
2 people like this
@UncleJoe (9484)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
15 Jan
They scared me too @bagarad That's why I had to close my eyes when driving through those long tunnels.
1 person likes this
@bagarad (11481)
• Paso Robles, California
15 Jan
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (41289)
• Gainesville, Florida
16 Jan
I was stuck behind a big rig once trying to climb a mountain in Colorado. Man, that thing was powering through gears like you couldn't imagine! (well, you could imagine, you were a truck driver...but the rest of could never really fathom the number of gears those truckers have to shift through to climb a steep incline!)
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (9484)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
16 Jan
@moffittjc That was you? I tried to wave you around me. LOL Today's truck engines are 5 times bigger with a tubocharger. Few have more than 15 speeds now. Instead of 2 sticks, there is only one with buttons that shift between 3 ranges. Did you get that?
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (41289)
• Gainesville, Florida
16 Jan
@UncleJoe Yeah, my best friend from childhood is a trucker. Just bought a new rig and he was proudly showing it off. Can't believe how much technology goes into those trucks now.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (37110)
• Portland, Connecticut
15 Jan
These days the trucks are driving faster and the drivers are working long hours without sleep, I try to avoid them at all costs.
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (9484)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
15 Jan
Actually, @BelleStarr very few try that "long hours without sleep" any more because penalties for getting caught driving over the 10 hour limit are astronomical. My son drives a truck that electronically records not only his driving time but also has 2 video cameras. One pointed straight down the highway and the other aimed at the driver. Those were originally designed to make sure a trucker wasn't using a cell phone while driving.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (37110)
• Portland, Connecticut
16 Jan
@UncleJoe In Connecticut, we seem to accidents weekly with semis involved.
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (100342)
• United States
14 Jan
It really does sound like it was a lot of work and took a lot of skill to drive those big trucks in the 60s.
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (9484)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
14 Jan
More so than today @Corbin5 but in those days we didn't have to worry about folks texting or talking on the phone while driving along at 55-60
2 people like this
@bagarad (11481)
• Paso Robles, California
15 Jan
@UncleJoe That made even driving cars safer back then. I don't want to ride the train, either. My friend was the last one pulled from an Amtrak wreck that killed 15 people, including the engineer who was texting when the crash happened.
2 people like this
@Morleyhunt (19539)
• Canada
14 Jan
My son inlaw is a long haul truck driver.... When we lived along a heavily travelled road (by gravel trucks) with an 8%grade....we learned to pause our conversations when a truck went by...they were either gearing to climb or to slow!
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (9484)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
14 Jan
@MorleyHunt Big trucks today are also equipped with an engine brake(called a "Jake", after the guy who invented it.) that works off of the exhaust. When you hear one go "BWAAAAAAA!" downhill the Jake has kicked in to help hold the load back and take some of the stress off of the wheel brakes.
1 person likes this
@shaggin (36314)
• United States
15 Jan
Eeek that you for the advice on staying out of the way if s truck driver going down a hill!
1 person likes this
@allen0187 (32665)
• Philippines
15 Jan
Truck driving is a long and tedious job based on stories that I've heard from friends.
1 person likes this