Can a million mothers be wrong?

@TheHorse (67105)
Pleasant Hill, California
February 3, 2018 10:31am CST
We've all heard that too much sugar makes children go nutso, and that parents throwing a birthday party for an 8-year-old should be ready for some will behaviors among the kids there. But did you know that there's very little research to support this connection, and that most psychologists consider the sugar-hyperactivity connection to be a myth? Children get hyper when they're overstimulated, not because birthday cake or Halloween candy gives them a sugar high. There have even been well-controlled "double blind" experiments to support the "myth" hypothesis. What do you think?
Many concerned parents and health organizations believe there is a link between a child's diet and behavior.
39 people like this
38 responses
@andriaperry (53497)
• United States
3 Feb
I do not know. I always allowed the children I was in charge of to play and run off their sugar and on days I wanted to be mean I allowed them to have candy before mom picked them up sometimes buying and sending with them horns or drums. Kids love me
11 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Ah yes, send 'em home with drums. Kids love you, but parents not so much. Heh.
5 people like this
@kobesbuddy (49743)
• East Tawas, Michigan
4 Feb
@TheHorse When I had a licensed daycare home, sugar was never considered a problem for these kids.
3 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
4 Feb
@kobesbuddy Nah, I don't worry about it that much. Some of the kids I work with are old enough to discuss this kin of thing with me. "Let me know if you turn into a raving lunatic because I bought you a Big Mac and Coke after we shot hoops."
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (163802)
• Switzerland
3 Feb
I have read from many sources that it is not at all sure that sugar makes kids hyperactive. As you say it's more the situation that makes them excited, like having a party with other kids, being allowed to do things that are not usually allowed or stay up later just because they are having a fan time with friends.
9 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Exactly. We experienced at a the preschool the other day. A special event. Everyone all excited. No sugar involved.
8 people like this
@LadyDuck (163802)
• Switzerland
3 Feb
@TheHorse It's almost the same for the adults. We get excited during special celebrations.
6 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
@LadyDuck Yes, though if the celebration is too big, I try to find one or two people to talk to.
5 people like this
• Jacksonville, Florida
3 Feb
I think it is the situation that makes them more excited. When my kids are at home and have candy they are calm but when at a party or fun event they go wild! Lol
7 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Exactly. It's funny how some myths persist, though.
3 people like this
• United States
3 Feb
When my grandchildren get together they are excited and full of energy even before they've had any candy or cake. I think there might be some connection but sugar isn't entirely to blame for kids being hyper
6 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Yeppers. We Have a special day at the preschool the other day, celebrating trees. No sugar in the snacks (except a bit of fructose), but the kids went wild and very few slept at nap time.
5 people like this
• United States
3 Feb
@TheHorse I think kids just have lots of energy to burn and can't sit still for long. I've always wondered about the sugary snacks being to blame but tend to think it's less to blame than we think
3 people like this
@AJAYSAXENA (1945)
• Hyderabad, India
3 Feb
I think i support research because in our time when we used to have these kind of stuffs it was more natural but now a days all foods are grown with chemical so might be because of that there will be a risk of getting of disease.
5 people like this
@Daelii (5685)
• United States
3 Feb
That is a very good point! Most candy doesn't even have actually sugar in it. I think it really is the excitement/ reward part.
3 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
I love Altoids (full of sugar) and avoid sugar-free mints. They always taste like chemicals to me.
2 people like this
• Hyderabad, India
3 Feb
@TheHorse But it was not like that in past my friend but now a days because of inventions of chemicals they are using instead of fruits or natural they are using chemicals for taste etc.
3 people like this
@Corbin5 (109662)
• United States
3 Feb
I did know this. I believe that sugar making kids hyperactive is truly a myth. Heck, sugar actually makes kids tired.
5 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
It may, running around and having a good time makes kids tired. When I worked with older children, many fell asleep on the way home from a day of shopping and hiking.
5 people like this
@ptrikha_2 (8745)
• India
4 Feb
@corbin5 in fact many a times more salt or sugar can make us lethargic.
1 person likes this
@PainsOnSlate (20341)
• Canada
3 Feb
I think they got that right, the sugar never bothered my kids but overstimulating children would go ballistic in my house.
5 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Yep, that's what I observe as well.
2 people like this
@DianneN (79948)
• United States
3 Feb
Having raised two sons, I know from experience that sugar has nothing to do with hyperactivity.
4 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Yeppers, it's all about the environment. My little Berkeley CA (healthy food) boys can be perfectly rowdy (and sometimes almost out of control) without processed sugar, thank you very much.
3 people like this
@DianneN (79948)
• United States
3 Feb
3 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
@DianneN Welcome to my world. I;m trying to teach them to play "catch," but sometimes they can't help but heave any object in their hands as far as they can.
3 people like this
@TheSojourner (17442)
• United States
3 Feb
Great discussion to debunk the myth that so many have bought into
3 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
When I hear mothers say, "Here comes the sugar high!" I generally just smile politely and watch the kids have fun.
5 people like this
• United States
3 Feb
@TheHorse and no matter how many you may show the facts, there will always be people who will swear that you're wrong.
3 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
@CoralLevang Heh. That is true. My young neighbor friend's mom thumbs her nose at things like "science."
4 people like this
@Morleyhunt (19857)
• Canada
3 Feb
I've watched the sugar high and the crash that follows. I've experienced it myself. I guess I don't follow with the scientific research.
3 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
I think that any time we get really active, there can be a crash that follows. That includes when adults play sports.
1 person likes this
@pitstop (6244)
• India
3 Feb
I have seen my son ho berserk even when he is all alone and has something very sweet. I've seen it in many kids. I don't think it is a myth
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
He's never gone beserk when he didn't have something sweet?
2 people like this
@pitstop (6244)
• India
3 Feb
@TheHorse it is a different kind of craziness he exhibits when on a sugar high. It peaked at around 3 years and then faded away.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
4 Feb
@pitstop How was it different? When did it happen? Were there other people around?
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (118615)
• Boise, Idaho
4 Feb
Sugar just gives a bit of a rush and then it is gone anyway. Some kids are really hyperactive and are more sensitive to sugar. That is my belief.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
4 Feb
Yes, the research suggests that SOME kids are sensitive to sugar.
2 people like this
@celticeagle (118615)
• Boise, Idaho
4 Feb
@TheHorse ......Everyone is different.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
5 Feb
@celticeagle But a majority of youngsters do not get a sugar high from sugar.
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (43977)
• Gainesville, Florida
3 Feb
There's no question that overstimulation is a major contributing factor to hyperactivity in kids. I've seen it happen many times to my own children, even when they haven't had lots of sugar.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Yep. Eventually they crash and burn, though, giving the parents some time for grown-up things.
1 person likes this
@moffittjc (43977)
• Gainesville, Florida
3 Feb
@TheHorse Yeah, it gives us time for grown-up things like catching up on much-needed sleep! haha
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
@moffittjc Yep. Or maybe paying a bill or two.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (126348)
• Bunbury, Australia
4 Feb
I think in days gone by we didn't know about the sugar highs. We just put it down to being over-excited.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
5 Feb
But there is no such thing as a sugar high for most kids. Does that mean we've come full circle?
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (126348)
• Bunbury, Australia
5 Feb
@TheHorse So it seems. It's official now is it? No sugar highs? Or just no highs for most kids?
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
5 Feb
@JudyEv I assume there are pre-diabetic kids for whom sugar makes a difference. But for most, it's a myth.
@nanette64 (17711)
• Fairfield, Texas
3 Feb
I don't know @TheHorse . What's in the Power Drinks that makes teenagers bounce off the walls? Is that caffeine? One things for sure about the sugar thing though and that is that it rots the hell out of the kids teeth.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Yep, caffeine. I think kids have to learn early to brush and floss.
3 people like this
@nanette64 (17711)
• Fairfield, Texas
3 Feb
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
@nanette64 Alas, I'm not a part of that ritual with the younger kids I work with now. I'm not sure what happens at home.
2 people like this
@SIMPLYD (80362)
• Philippines
4 Feb
In my opinion, it is not the loaded with sugary foods that make the children hyperactive. As children, we 5 siblings all girls grew up hyperactive too. That's because we have a big lawn where we can play hide and seek, running and a lot of games. My daughter wasn't super active when she was a kid because she's always with her nanny at home. But when she is at school, the nanny says she's so super active because she has playmates.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
5 Feb
Yep, that sounds about right. Kids can cover a lot of ground, given the opportunity. And when they're with friends, their imaginations run wild.
1 person likes this
@SIMPLYD (80362)
• Philippines
6 Feb
@valmnz (12755)
• New Zealand
4 Feb
I do know that back in the 70s our toddler son was always hyper after sugar. One occasion when he grabbed the sugar bowl and scoffed it down on a very ordinary occasion he went over the top with hyperactive behaviour. Apparently research shows it's not the sugar but the chemicals to whiten it.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
5 Feb
I'll have to check that out. I usually use either brown sugar or maple syrup (occasionally honey), but it's for taste reasons.
@vandana7 (66120)
• India
3 Feb
I think 8 years old are smart...they know how to increase the work load of adults and punish them for scolding them. As long as they are younger, they haven't figured it out.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
Four-year-olds have their tricks.
2 people like this
@paigea (22417)
• Canada
3 Feb
It is easy to prove children don't need sugar to become over stimulated in certain situations. But I think an overall poor diet can lead to a less calm child. Brains and bodies function better with good nutrition.
2 people like this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
3 Feb
I'm sure I could make a nutritionist mad after a couple of drinks at a party. Kids need enough to eat, but a part of me thinks it doesn't matter what it is. I'm a big advocate for exercise, though.
2 people like this
@HazySue (21937)
• United States
4 Feb
I have a grandson that has a sugar flip-out about twenty minutes after eating cake or candy or cookies or.....well you get the idea. They may not have done a scientific study of it but he could certainly be a case study for the proof of that theory.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
5 Feb
Real scientists never use the word "proof."
1 person likes this
@HazySue (21937)
• United States
5 Feb
@TheHorse I guess it a good thing I am not a scientist.
1 person likes this
@TheHorse (67105)
• Pleasant Hill, California
5 Feb
@HazySue We say something intellectual sounding like "The data strongly support the hypothesis that..."
1 person likes this