Kith and Kin

@eileenleyva (10684)
Philippines
March 11, 2018 3:46am CST
Talk about the vicissitudes of life, there is one thing about Filipino mothers and their daughters who migrated to America puzzles me. Many stories have it, tales of aching mothers who, in many ways than one, have received maltreatment from their own daughters. There was one who threw a glass of water on her mother's face. Another slapped and pulled the hair of her almost nonanegarian mother. Another one literally asked her mother to leave home and dwell in a one-room rented flat. I couldn't believe these stories of Pinoy immigrants. Back home, in our country, the Philippines, we offer our mothers the utmost care. My own mother resigned from work when my grandmother fell ill with cancer. Have you heard uncanny tales of such abuse?
7 people like this
8 responses
@jstory07 (64125)
• Roseburg, Oregon
11 Mar
You should care for your parents when they get older not abuse them.
2 people like this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
11 Mar
Indeed, Judy. In fact, of all the sweetest words there ever is, the word mother is what I love most.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
11 Mar
those are rude ladies to abuse their own mothers. hmmm maybe the mother is doing something unpleasant also to their daughters and theye just making a revenge. its sad but not all mothers deserved to be called a mother, some are irresponsible and torture their children.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
13 Mar
A very good point. But in the case of the nonanegarian mother, her daughter is unica hija and she cared for her all her life.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
14 Mar
@eileenleyva hope somebody care and report the daughter lol
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
14 Mar
@Strawberry18 The mother was brought to a nursing home. She continues to cry.
1 person likes this
@mydanods (6798)
• Nigeria
15 Mar
It happened to my parents. My sister-in-law who was arranged to marry my brother who lives in America literally turned a different person when she arrived America. She literally chased my parents out of my brothers house because she didn't like them again. She had all sorts of excuses to give to my brother and was so quarrelsome that my brother became confused about the issue. My parents left the house to have their peace of mind.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
15 Mar
That is a very sad story indeed. I do hope your brother realizes the truth and reprimand his wife for being mean to his parents. In-laws must respect and care for the old folks.
1 person likes this
@mydanods (6798)
• Nigeria
15 Mar
@eileenleyva He is slowly coming to realize his wife is lazy and argumentative. That's some success.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
15 Mar
@mydanods All in God's sweet precious time. He makes all things beautiful in His time. Here's hoping your sister-in-law has a change of heart. No matter how worse situations are in life, there comes a time when things changes for the better. I will keep a prayer for you and your family. Blessings to you.
1 person likes this
11 Mar
Influences... Allow me to use another example. When i got to the east, your people swam fully clothed. Divorce is unheard of and people are happy. Travel to places exposed to western influences and they wear what my people wear, get divorced as much as white people do, and are as broken as we are. My cousins suffer from cystic fibrosis. Their dad earns a nice salary but does nothing to support them
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
11 Mar
The Philippines had been under many a colonial rule: the Arabs, the clannish Chinese, the hot-tempered Spaniards, and the Americans. Divorce is still a no-no, and many women are still prude. But true, the colonial mentality is a negative trait. But children, whether thay are Africans or Americans, Chinese, or English, or Filipinos, must love and care for their parents. Which province of my country did you enjoy most? What food did you like?
1 person likes this
11 Mar
@eileenleyva i am horrible with names. But what i do know is that i love your country a lot more than Korea. I taught engkish there for two years
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
13 Mar
@FrancoisBezuidenhout I couldn't comment on Korea, for their people have invaded us. Kimchi and Korean delicacies occupy a good part of the grocery store.Korean kiosks are everywhere. Do you speak Korean? Or my language, Tagalog?
@tmnjyk (3490)
• Canada
12 Mar
wow I'm impressed with your writing skill as a filipino immigrant, you will do well in the USA. I see a lot of these incidents myself in Canada.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
13 Mar
Thank you. I was given an immigrant visa but no, I had to let it go. My place is here and my country is more than good enough for me. My physical constitution, in the first place, calls for a tropical weather. I couldn't endure the cold. The incidents you mentioned pertain to Filipinos?
@tmnjyk (3490)
• Canada
14 Mar
@eileenleyva yes of course, im filipino myself living in Canada. I signed up on this site sometime last 2006 when mylot just started and left around April 2007 when I started working full time and since then I forgot about this and last night for some reason, I remembered mylot! after all these years! hahaha and was surprised to see few messages from people back in 2007. I was happy I was able to find one on fabebook. She was surprised I found here. Wow! I can't believe its been that long ago since I was on here.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
14 Mar
@tmnjyk That's a wonderful story. I am glad you remembered. Mylot is a site where we can express freely our thoughts and opinions. Somehow, it also enhances our writing skills because we are compelled to read and write, Hope you get more wonderful experiences with our virtual friends here.
@JudyEv (115704)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Mar
It is very sad that this in happening. In Australia, many carers in aged care facilities are Philippino and they have a very good reputation for being kind, caring people.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
13 Mar
Yes, Judy. I have a nephew and a niece who migrated to Sydney. They are both caregivers now and studying at the same time to become nurses. They both love their wards. My niece even use her personal money to purchase perfumed soaps and lotion, shampoo and body wash for her wards. When the family realized that, they reimbursed her expenses, to her dismay. She just loved caring for her wards.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (115704)
• Bunbury, Australia
13 Mar
@eileenleyva That is very kind of your niece.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
14 Mar
@JudyEv Australia was an awakening for my niece and my nephew. They were kinda becoming complacent with life back here. When they got to Sydney, responsibility and duty became the tall order of the day. But yes, both of them were very loving to their grandma. It was easy enough for them to love and care for the elderly.
1 person likes this
@allen0187 (31139)
• Philippines
12 Mar
Heard about it but never experienced it first hand. So sad.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
13 Mar
Sad indeed. Some of the stories I heard were unbelievable, for I knew those people. I couldn't understand why they became mean.
1 person likes this
@RasmaSandra (16265)
• Riga, Latvia
11 Mar
Parents should be taken care of and not abused. Sad to hear such things.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (10684)
• Philippines
11 Mar
Very sad. I am still in utter disbelief.
1 person likes this