13 Food Superstitions

Garlic and salt LadyDuck
@LadyDuck (157429)
Switzerland
July 12, 2018 8:39am CST
As Friday 13th, is approaching, I thought it could be interesting to share some superstitions. The following are all superstitions about food. 1 - spilling salt on the table brings bad luck. As a remedy, throw salt over your left shoulder with your right hand. 2 - do not offer a hot pepper to a friend, this will bring discord into your friendship. 3 - when you serve tea, never pour milk before sugar, or you will never get married. 4 - do not offer a knife as a gift, this gesture symbolize "cutting ties". 5 - a large bubble in a bread loaf announce that someone you know will die. 6 - garlic not only protect from vampires but also from the curse of an evil eye. 7 - long noodles represent long life. Do not cut noodles short. 8 - if you go fishing, do not bring bananas on a fishing boat or you will fish nothing. 9 - do not turn the bread upside down on the table, this is considered a rude gesture. 10 - two yolks in the same eggs, means that someone you know will have twins. 11 - If you want to avoid rain, bury Bourbon on the wedding site. 12 - catch the bubbles floating on the top of your coffee to earn more money. 13 - offer an orange to someone, if you want that he/she fells in love with you. Do you know food superstitions to share?
71 people like this
68 responses
@Icydoll (19698)
• India
12 Jul
Keeping lemon under pillow can save one from devils lol
10 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
12 Jul
This is something I did not know, thanks for sharing.
2 people like this
@Icydoll (19698)
• India
12 Jul
@LadyDuck yes ,some blindly believe In that Anna
1 person likes this
@shshiju (10492)
• Cochin, India
12 Jul
Do you know that some motorists like to hang lemon in front of their vehicle. And dealers supply their vehicles after rolling the front Tyre on a lemon.
3 people like this
• Jacksonville, Florida
12 Jul
I think I have only heard the ones you shared and some of those are new to me also. So silly! Lol.
8 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
12 Jul
Sometimes it is curious to know how superstitions started. For some is known, for others nobody knows.
1 person likes this
@responsiveme (16240)
• India
12 Jul
I know the no 1, for no 2 it's chillies ,did you mean that type of pepper...So we give a little bit of sugar too if we are distributing chillies among friends. On the other hand when we give some cooked food at night,we include a chilli to ward off the ghosts who may want to taste the food.... Well I don't really do that but know lots who do
3 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
12 Jul
Yes, I mean chillies. Interesting to know about the sugar. I did not know about the chilli with the cooked food, this is also interesting. I try not to be superstitious, incredibly my young niece believes in some.
3 people like this
• India
12 Jul
@LadyDuck I meant if we give cooked food to neighbours or friends which is carried outside the house after sun sets, I was not clear earlier. If I see the person is superstitious then I do add a chilli with the stuff they will carry away. By myself not superstitious as such....Maybe a bit Like not cutting hair or nails on Thursday...Hu by is not at all superstitous
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
12 Jul
@responsiveme I also try not to do things that could upset superstitious people. My niece is a bit superstitious, I would never make a toast with a glass of water.
3 people like this
@Corbin5 (106416)
• United States
12 Jul
Throwing a pomegranate to the ground on New Year's Eve brings good luck. The amount of luck depends upon how wide the pomegranate pops open when thrown to the ground. The wider it opens, the more luck the person will have in the following year.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
We eat pomegranate seeds on New Year's Eve for good luck, I never heard about throwing it on the ground. Interesting.
2 people like this
@Corbin5 (106416)
• United States
13 Jul
@LadyDuck I think I am going to smash one really hard for good luck this New Year's Eve.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
@Corbin5 I am collecting the small pomegranates on my little tree and smash all of them.
2 people like this
@Kandae11 (37040)
13 Jul
You seem to have covered most of them. I will start doing No. 12.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
I thought to prepare iced coffee, this should form bubbles on the top.
2 people like this
@Kandae11 (37040)
13 Jul
@LadyDuck Oh yes - hot won't do it.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
@Kandae11 I think that even rich people would never say no to a little more money.
2 people like this
@ridingbet (53021)
• Philippines
13 Jul
i saw Rachel Ward throwing some salt with her right hand over her left shoulder. i sometimes do that. also when a pregnant woman eats banana twins (2 in 1) she will have twins. garlic we know protects us from evil entities, and it can also be used to control toothache. and of course, noodles means long life.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
It is the same for spaghetti in Italy, this is why Italians never cut spaghetti.
2 people like this
@ridingbet (53021)
• Philippines
13 Jul
@LadyDuck yes, and when a tray of spaghetti is prepared by my sister, we use our fork to twirl the pasta, the usual way of spaghetti eating.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
@ridingbet All Italians twirl the spaghetti for eating, there is not another way to go.
2 people like this
@alberello75 (17528)
• Genova, Italy
16 Jul
To be honest, those of you listed, I only knew #1. My grandmother had indeed this superstitious ritual. But #9 (more or less) My grandfather used to say that "every bit of bread, represents a drop of sweat from your father" Others on food, others I do not know. But the classics like: do not pass under the stairs, or the hat on the bed, well I believe we all know already!
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
17 Jul
The umbrella opened inside the house, getting out of your bed with the left foot, eating keeping the spoon with the left hand... there are so many.
1 person likes this
@alberello75 (17528)
• Genova, Italy
17 Jul
@LadyDuck Exactly. You see. However, I am very skeptical of such "superstitious" rituals. It was once said, the number 13 were lucky (former totocalcio, now set at 14). Then No! It seems to me, Religion said 13 not good. I grew up when the unlucky number, it was 17!
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
18 Jul
@alberello75 In Italy the number 13 is still considered lucky and the 17 unlucky. If you studied Latin you should know about the 17. If you right it in Roman numeral 17 becomes XVII. If you change it anagrammatically to VIXI (vixi), in Latin translates to "I lived", that means "My life is over."
1 person likes this
@arunima25 (2454)
• Bangalore, India
13 Jul
Very interesting ones!! Thanks for sharing. In our culture, we don't give chillies in hand as it brings discord in relationship.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
This is interesting. In Italy we never form a cross on the dish with fork and knife, this is considered bad luck, as it reminds crucifixion.
1 person likes this
@arunima25 (2454)
• Bangalore, India
13 Jul
@LadyDuck In our culture licking fingers after meal is supposed to invite poverty.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
@arunima25 This is something considered so rude that nobody does.
1 person likes this
@dodoazo (19613)
• Philippines
17 Jul
Yes we have some of them. One I remember is that the pregnant woman won't eat twin babana for she will give birth to a twin.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
17 Jul
We have most of these and many more, but I am not superstitious.
1 person likes this
@dodoazo (19613)
• Philippines
17 Jul
@LadyDuck me too though our culture is rich with such traditional superstitions on varoius subjects or situations.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
17 Jul
@dodoazo I have known very superstitious people, their life becomes a nightmare.
1 person likes this
@Kasjnak (687)
• Romania
13 Jul
Knew most of them, but never heard about numbers 8, 11, 12 and 13. Actually, I think that the one with the banana is quite funny . I want to test it, next time I go fishing I'll bring some bananas. Maybe I'll throw one in the water to lure a fish or two .
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
I also think that the one with the bananas is funny. I have to check from where this comes from.
1 person likes this
@Kasjnak (687)
• Romania
13 Jul
@LadyDuck what about a pineapple? Maybe for those that go hunting . And does it matter if those bananas were red bananas?
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
@Kasjnak Pineapples are not mentioned and I believe that the mentioned bananas are the yellow variety.
1 person likes this
@nela13 (6995)
• Portugal
13 Jul
I only knew the first supersticion
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
14 Jul
The one of the salt is so common, it is said it comes from the fact that in ancient times salt was so precious and expensive, spilling it was a high cost.
1 person likes this
@nela13 (6995)
• Portugal
14 Jul
@LadyDuck I am not a very superstition person butI am careful with some things
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
15 Jul
@nela13 I do not consider myself superstitious, but there are things that I avoid.
1 person likes this
@HazySue (21334)
• United States
13 Jul
Most of the superstitions you shared are unknown to me. What a wonderful group of them. My mother-in-law would have loved them.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
14 Jul
My grandmother loved to hear about superstitions, she was careful about a few things, one was the spilled salt.
1 person likes this
@HazySue (21334)
• United States
14 Jul
@LadyDuck My mother-in-law liked that one too.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
15 Jul
@HazySue It is incredible how people finally believe in those old tales.
1 person likes this
@just4him (117058)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
13 Jul
I haven't heard of most of those. Interesting compilation. I don't know any food ones other than throwing salt over your shoulder.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
I have one more: If you spill coffee on the saucer, that indicates that you are going to receive money. I suppose that spilling on purpose brings nothing.
1 person likes this
@just4him (117058)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
13 Jul
@LadyDuck Darn! I don't drink coffee.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
@just4him Darn! I would not complain receiving a little money.
1 person likes this
@Lissiel (377)
• Philippines
13 Jul
I never heard food superstitions until now. It's good news that I never did any of it today. I eat less now, I'm on a diet, Lol. But I really like reading something like this. Thanks for sharing.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
I am always interested to know about weird superstitions, I thought that it was interesting to let even other people know.
1 person likes this
@Lissiel (377)
• Philippines
13 Jul
@LadyDuck Me too, I like when people share it to me and I can share it to others as well,
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
@Lissiel I agree, it's funny and interesting to know about traditions of other people.
1 person likes this
@bunnybon7 (36504)
• Holiday, Florida
12 Jul
you mentioned most i know about. but one is don't drop the dish towel on the floor unless you want to have a hungry guest to come to dinner. i didn't know about the noodles. i have always broken spaghetti noodles in half before i cook them so they will be easier to fit in pan and eat also. no wonder i am probably going to have a shorter life. i been making it happen
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
13 Jul
Italians never break spaghetti, it's the same as the noodles and then they are so hard to eat when they are broken.
1 person likes this
@bunnybon7 (36504)
• Holiday, Florida
13 Jul
@LadyDuck i always found it easier to eat it. as seems like when you wind the noodles on a fork you get too much to even eat and have to keep cutting like meat.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
14 Jul
@bunnybon7 Italians learn since very young age how to wind the spaghetti on a fork. I always get the right quantity.
1 person likes this
@much2say (39230)
• United States
12 Jul
I think more of my Japanese side when it comes to food superstitions - at least that's what I grew up with. Don't stand chopsticks in a bowl of rice - that's only for someone who has passed (how it is served on their altar). Don't "round" the rice in a bowl for the same reason. Don't pass your food from chopstick to chopstick with someone else (that symbolizes how they pass bones at a cremation ceremony). There are these sweet black beans we eat for New Year's - sometimes there is a gold one in it. My mom used to say eat 'em and you will have good fortune. When drinking tea, if a little tea stem stands up at the bottom of the cup, that means good luck.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
15 Jul
@much2say I know that salt and sage should be placed in the four corners of a room where you feel there are ghosts.
1 person likes this
@much2say (39230)
• United States
18 Jul
@LadyDuck Interesting! I actually have a sage type plant by the front porch . . . I wonder if adding some salt too would not allow ghosts to enter!
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
18 Jul
@much2say I also have a big sage bush near the back window, I could try.
@vandana7 (64929)
• India
12 Jul
Interesting...I always pour milk before sugar...in tea. That could be the reason I am not married. LOL As to orange ..now you tell me...Stephen Hawking is no more. :(
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
12 Jul
If you only knew, I am sure you would have put sugar first.
2 people like this
@vandana7 (64929)
• India
12 Jul
@LadyDuck Definitely...I would have flown all the way to Stephen Hawking's place, given him an orange, and returned back to make some tea...wait a second, is orange to be given first or is tea to be made first...not very clear there.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
12 Jul
@vandana7 You can skip the tea and only give the orange.
1 person likes this
@yugocean (8364)
• India
23h
These superstitious are actually some old phrases with some forgotten meaning. I don't think they are as said. One- Never drink before going out - But this is meaningful.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
20h
I cannot see the meaning of not drinking before going out. Drinking what? I drink water before going out in summer, to stay hydrated.
1 person likes this
@yugocean (8364)
• India
16h
@LadyDuck Yeah, superstition is right when we know real meaning of phrase.
1 person likes this
@porwest (4857)
• United States
15 Jul
I think you have covered the gamut here. Some of these I had heard of before. Most of them I have not. So most of these are new to me. Luckily I am not superstitious. Mostly.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
15 Jul
Same as you, I am mostly not superstitious, but I still try to avoid to do some things.
1 person likes this
@porwest (4857)
• United States
16 Jul
@LadyDuck I think we all do ultimately, superstitious or not. Just in case.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
16 Jul
@porwest Exactly! After all it costs nothing to avoid to do things.
1 person likes this
@Shellyann36 (9616)
• United States
13 Jul
I have never heard of any of these. They are very interesting though. Thank you for sharing. I did know that salt over the shoulder was supposed to bring good luck or something of the sort, now I see it is meant to stop bad luck.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
14 Jul
The salt over the shoulder does not bring good luck, but it is to prevent the "bad luck" caused by the spilling of the salt (that was a very expensive good in the ancient times).
1 person likes this
• United States
17 Jul
@LadyDuck Oh, I did not know that was what it was for. Thank you for clearing that up.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (157429)
• Switzerland
17 Jul
@Shellyann36 The ancient Roman soldiers were paid with salt, from this the term "salary" because of the payment in salt.
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