Those Favorite Slang Words

@andriaperry (52948)
United States
August 9, 2018 6:32am CST
I had no idea where in the world my nephew came up with the word "gooder" when he was around 3-4 years old but he told me something was gooder and I will say there was a lesson taught right then and there! I was not standing for him sounding dumb when I knew he was exceptionally bright. I gave him the "good, better and best" list to chose from and it was like a light came on and he smiled. Most of the time I do say tomato when in public but at home I have been know to say mater, but it still sounds more like may-er. I ask " you want mater on your samich? Oh there goes another! Sandwich, its often called a samich around there parts. Why am I thinking about words and how some people in the deep south pronounce them? I was just reading @marlina discussion about being out of bananas, that are also referred to as nanners. Yes that is nan-ners. What are your favorite slang words?
17 people like this
18 responses
@Juliaacv (31177)
• Canada
9 Aug
We call bananas nanners also, and we always say cukes, and never cucumbers. And like most Canadians, we call coke or ginger ale pop, and not soda, we differ there by our countries I think. I will often refer to water as wa wa. I know how that sounds......
3 people like this
@Juliaacv (31177)
• Canada
9 Aug
@andriaperry I knew that if I mentioned that you, then you would get a chuckle out of it. I didn't mean anything else by it at all. That's your morning laugh, and this might be another one. Do you know that I had never ever heard of calling a sandwich a sammich until I read some of JJ's posts? Never, not even once, and I see where someone else mentioned it. Ain't that somethin?
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
@Juliaacv Yes it is, where you been not hearing sammich?!
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@Juliaacv (31177)
• Canada
9 Aug
@andriaperry Canada, I guess it isn't a word up here. But snirt, that's a word up here, it is what is left from the melting snow when its covered with dirt.
1 person likes this
@marlina (74708)
• Canada
9 Aug
I did not know about this slang word for bananas "nan-ners". Of course, English is not my initial language. I can't think of a favorite slang word right now, sorry.
3 people like this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
What is your language?
1 person likes this
@marlina (74708)
• Canada
9 Aug
@andriaperry I spoke French all my life.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
10 Aug
@marlina Ah, okay.
1 person likes this
@Platespinner (16774)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
9 Aug
Mrs J discovered at one point that she had been in the south long enough to start dropping the g sound from words ending in ing. So the entire family packed up and moved from Alabama to North Carolina.
3 people like this
@MALUSE (41156)
• Germany
9 Aug
Your people are obviously language purists and suffered when the 'g' was dropped in the ending 'ing'. So they had to leave.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
LOL.
@MALUSE (41156)
• Germany
9 Aug
When a child says 'gooder', it shows that it has understood the regular grammar structure of the English language. This has nothing to do with 'sounding dumb'. On the contrary. When it becomes older, it learns the exceptions. The examples you've mentioned here are not slang words but belong to the category 'idiolects'. These are peculiarities only one person or a small group of persons (family, friends) uses. If 'sammich' can be heard in a certain geographical region, then it is a dialect word. 'Slang' is defined here (Too long to put in this comment box):
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=slang
2 people like this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
Yes ma`am. But when you live in the southern USA and someone says gooder no matter the age you are marked as "dumb" Its a USA thing and has nothing to do with the levels of growth or education. Nothing against teachers, but we, in Alabama, have to teach our children how to do math, read, write and speak proper words before going school, because some of them are dumber than the children they have to teach.
@MALUSE (41156)
• Germany
9 Aug
@andriaperry That's shocking news. What's the reason for having dumb teachers in Alabama?
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
@MALUSE I am not sure its just here, more and more people are home schooling their children nowadays.
@rakski (18266)
• Philippines
9 Aug
How about 'oning'? It is supposed to turn on. But my son when younger told his dad the the TV is not 'oning' Another one from my brother in law when he was a kid, the word 'basketing' for basketball.
2 people like this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
I can hear those being spoken right now.
1 person likes this
@rakski (18266)
• Philippines
10 Aug
1 person likes this
@aureliah (16657)
9 Aug
In my country, Swahili and English are the national languages. Most people speak swahili and use (SHENG) which you call Slang. I always wonder where some of these words come from as the way they sound its not even related to what they are used for
2 people like this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
I have no idea.
1 person likes this
@Courage7 (7863)
• United States
9 Aug
Don''t use many slang words that I can think of only in jest. Had properness bred into us from the start, didn't get much of a chance to slang it. We would get in trouble else lol
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
Hmm.... I had a sister that was nothing but proper, she was 18 years older. I learned what " That is not becoming behavior for a young lady" meant early. Ya know I aint seen that old witch in 30 years.
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@Courage7 (7863)
• United States
9 Aug
@andriaperry Oh dear she sounded a real disciplinarian
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@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
10 Aug
@Courage7 she loved when we jumped on thee bed
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@LadyDuck (162741)
• Switzerland
9 Aug
English is not my language, I do not know slang words, may be I have heard some that now I can recognize (I think to remember that taters means potatoes), but I have no favorite slang words.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
Oh yes! I forgot taters.
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@LadyDuck (162741)
• Switzerland
10 Aug
@andriaperry I am glad I got this one right.
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@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
10 Aug
@LadyDuck LOL, yes you did good!
1 person likes this
@wolfgirl569 (6109)
• Marion, Ohio
9 Aug
I love nanners. That is one I use a lot.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
That one seems to be a normal word then
• Marion, Ohio
9 Aug
@andriaperry It does seem to be and I think taters is too. It gets used a lot here.
1 person likes this
@toniganzon (51575)
• Philippines
9 Aug
I don't think I have a favroite at all.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
Nothing?
@toniganzon (51575)
• Philippines
9 Aug
@andriaperry Nothing at all.
1 person likes this
@porwest (5704)
• United States
9 Aug
It is fun to think of certain slang words or certain ways we say things. I get picked on sometimes because I am from Wisconsin and sometimes my T's sound like D's, and I say "hey" a lot.
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@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
LOL, c`mon give me a word that`s not hey.
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@porwest (5704)
• United States
12 Aug
@andriaperry Bubbler. In Wisconsin we call a water fountain a bubbler.
• New Baltimore, Michigan
10 Aug
I still like to call mosquitoes "skeeters"... But here are a few of my little nephew's (he's only 5.) He says things like, "Where is her?" Or "her not here, I don't know where her is." But my fave is what he calls me. He can't pronounce my name too well, so instead of Auntie Melanie, I get "Ontee Montee."
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@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
10 Aug
Oh yeah! I forgot skeeters. Love kids! they can make you smile at that age.
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@BabeSays (2417)
• Mauritius
10 Aug
In Mauritius we speak Creol and I don't know much slang since I'm not very social. But I know once call 'Soupless'it means everything goimg smooth.
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@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
10 Aug
Cool! I like that.
1 person likes this
• United States
9 Aug
If you would ever be around me when I talk you would probably do a double take. I am constantly getting asked to repeat myself. I speak in mostly slang. Instead of over yonder I say "over yar". I also say more gooder or more better, I say yeller instead of yellow. Yount to, mater, tater, nanner, etc. The list just goes on. My teachers used to give me a fit about my dialogue. I also say punkin instead of pumpkin. I guess it is just a southern thang.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
10 Aug
Some people cannot understand me either. I say punkin too!
@GardenGerty (100309)
• United States
9 Aug
I used to call refrigerator "frigidgator" until my sister got on to me for teaching her youngster wrong. Nothing else comes to mind right now.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
LOL, they were calling it that too?
@kepweng (16869)
• Waikoloa, Hawaii
9 Aug
my Favorite Slang Words how are u??
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
• United States
9 Aug
i probably use too many to list..and my discussions are peppered with 'em.
1 person likes this
@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
Mine too, I always get those red lines under letting me know I did not spell that right.
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@franxav (5197)
9 Aug
As far as possible I try to avoid them. Moreover, in our region the word "slang" itself is reserved for abusive words.
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@andriaperry (52948)
• United States
9 Aug
Oh, here we call those cuss works. or cursing.