Do You Know Your Homonyms?

@just4him (128670)
Green Bay, Wisconsin
September 14, 2018 10:59am CST
I've known what they are, but until recently didn't know what they were called? Do you, before I go on to explain? Homonyms are words that sound alike but have different spellings and meanings. For instance, in the title, there are two examples, used correctly. Know and No Your and You're How about: To, Too, and Two There, They're, and Their Pore, Poor, and Pour Its and It's Many people use words incorrectly without realizing it, and it can get frustrating to an avid reader when a common word is misused as it changes the entire meaning of the text around it. Two words that aren't homonyms yet are abused all the time are lose and loose. This particular one is my pet peeve. Even Word will want me to use loose when I mean lose. I do know the difference between losing something and having loose-fitting clothes. If you don't know what word you're supposed to use, say the sentence out loud. In the sentence I just used, you're is correct, but you would know that if you said: If you don't know what word you are supposed to use. Break down your contractions and you will always use the right word in your writing. A blog site such as myLot is a great place to practice your writing. When you do, you will get it right every time. Have fun writing. Thanks for reading.
18 people like this
19 responses
@1creekgirl (12485)
• United States
14 Sep
I guess your and you're are the ones that bug me the most.
5 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
They bug me a lot too. If you take apart the word you'll easily know if you're using it correctly.
3 people like this
@LadyDuck (182457)
• Switzerland
14 Sep
I know many real homonyms in my language, identical words with different meanings example "capitale" is written and spelled the same and can mean "capital" (of a state) or a sum of money.
5 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
That's a good example.
2 people like this
@NJChicaa (47461)
• United States
14 Sep
Yes I knew what they were called.
4 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
I've been hunting for what they were called for a long time and only just found out when I started with the editing program I just purchased.
2 people like this
@andriaperry (61190)
• Anniston, Alabama
14 Sep
Blew and blue. But the misuse of the words "then and than" irks me. And by no means am I the smartest or best speller, but come on!
4 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
Good examples and I understand how those words irk you. They're probably number two on my pet peeves list. No, I take that back, the misuse of your and you're is second.
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (11266)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
14 Sep
My sister has been getting homonym shots to help her hot flashes.
3 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
I hope they helped.
1 person likes this
@UncleJoe (11266)
• Virginia Beach, Virginia
14 Sep
@just4him It has! Her writing ability has greatly improved.
2 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
@UncleJoe That's great!
2 people like this
@marlina (79646)
• Canada
14 Sep
Yes, I have known my homonyms since I was a kid.
3 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
That's wonderful. I knew them, didn't know what they were called.
1 person likes this
@anya12adwi (3973)
• Bhubaneshwar, India
14 Sep
Write, Right, Rite.. See, I found one such pair of homonym
2 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
Yes, but is Rite a real word outside the name of a store? I don't know the meaning of that one.
2 people like this
@Elizaby (4087)
• Pensacola, Florida
14 Sep
@just4him It is often use in terms of rite of passage.
2 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
@Elizaby Ah, yes. I didn't think of that one. Thanks for reminding me.
2 people like this
@pgntwo (22753)
• Tripoli, Lebanon
14 Sep
Ein Teekesselchen - Schale.
A pair of pears? Ein Teekesselchen in German, a truism to which @MALUSE will attest, and possibly explain the one pictured above, time permitting...?
1 person likes this
@MALUSE (44642)
• Uzbekistan
14 Sep
Do you mean Birne - fruit and part of a lamp? I've just seen that you've written the solution in the photos. I thought it was an English word with two meanings we should find and couldn't understand it. I'd never think of 'Schale' for the lower one. Only 'plate' comes to mind.
2 people like this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
@pgntwo Pair and pear is a good example. Not sure about your photos though. It looks like a vegetable peeler and a plate.
1 person likes this
@pgntwo (22753)
• Tripoli, Lebanon
14 Sep
@just4him It is as you say. Both are written "Schale" : peel, or rind, and bowl.
1 person likes this
@snowy22315 (54318)
• United States
15 Sep
fair and fare stair and stare..there are probably a gazillion of them really.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
I found a lot of them in my first book, Scarred, I didn't know about, but got them straightened out in the second edition.
1 person likes this
@snowy22315 (54318)
• United States
15 Sep
@just4him That's good!
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
@snowy22315 Yes. I was shocked at how many words were homonyms.
@Courtlynn (55293)
• United States
15 Sep
Most people get them wrong here and there. I know I do. My autocorrect on my phone also doesn't help lol.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
I've heard a lot of complaints about autocorrect. I've had to watch it carefully when I text as well.
1 person likes this
@Courtlynn (55293)
• United States
15 Sep
@just4him it can be a pain, especially when rushing to text or even write on here. which is what I do when busy, or really don't want to be on here but have lots of notifications to go through.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
16 Sep
@Courtlynn I like being here, but I never use my phone for anything but talk and text.
@Elizaby (4087)
• Pensacola, Florida
14 Sep
The golfer yell "fore" before hitting a "four" shot to par out on the green. "for his next shot he boggy. To "see" the "sea" in all it's "fury" in a storm makes you glad you have a "Furry" pet to cuddle with. What do you "hear" "here" "Bea" wanted the "bee" sitting on the edge of the "pitcher" to "be still so she could take a picture. You have got me on a roll (which also has a homonym "role").
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
That was an awesome read.
1 person likes this
@Elizaby (4087)
• Pensacola, Florida
15 Sep
@just4him And read depending if it is present (reed) or past (red) tense.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
16 Sep
@Elizaby Reed is a stalk and red is a color. Read has only one spelling for both present and past tense. Unlike Lead and led.
1 person likes this
@dgobucks226 (14313)
15 Sep
I would like to address this topic of homonyms, ops or did I mean I would like a website address which gives examples of homonyms. Enjoyable read!
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
Thank you. Sometimes I just get tired of seeing words misused here.
1 person likes this
@dgobucks226 (14313)
15 Sep
@just4him You bet!
1 person likes this
@mnglsp (1603)
• Philippines
14 Sep
When I was in elementary these words are the words that I am confused about.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
When you know the meaning, it gets easier to get them right.
1 person likes this
@mnglsp (1603)
• Philippines
15 Sep
@just4him That's true.
1 person likes this
@RonElFran (1139)
• Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
15 Sep
Your and You're are the ones I see misused most often. In fact, I have to admit to sometimes getting them wrong myself.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
I think that's the one most often misused here.
@jstory07 (71213)
• Roseburg, Oregon
15 Sep
Sometimes it is hard to know which word to you. Which one is the witch.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
Yes, it can be hard. Good example.
@porwest (8429)
• United States
15 Sep
I do. And it IRKS me when people get it wrong. Probably the editor in me.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
Most likely.
1 person likes this
@Corbin5 (119458)
• United States
14 Sep
Homonyms can cause problems at times. My students struggled with those homonyms.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
The one that always got me until I sat down and really looked at it and finally got it right, was piece and peace. I was in third grade and got that one wrong on every spelling test until I looked at the meaning. I haven't gotten it wrong since.
1 person likes this
@lovebuglena (7559)
• Staten Island, New York
14 Sep
Then/than, it's/its and they're/their/there are probably the most common mistakes made by people, even native speakers. And it becomes obvious when people simply made a typo or when it's a real mistake they don't even know they are making. Maybe if people bothered to always proofread what they write that could be avoided. Although if people write "it's" when it should be "its" and think they are correct, proofreading won't fix that.
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
15 Sep
It would if they read it as it is. Another one that is common is your/you're. People use your when they mean you're all the time.
@Icydoll (25964)
• India
14 Sep
Yes I know about homonyms my dear friend
1 person likes this
@just4him (128670)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
14 Sep
That's great you do.
1 person likes this