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@MALUSE (43661)
Uzbekistan
October 10, 2018 2:01pm CST
When I saw the name of a sender of an email the other day, an Italian legal office, I wasn’t surprised. After all my husband is an Italian and belongs to the legal profession. When I opened it, I was dumbstruck and I panicked. An Avvocato Gianluca Gentili from Rome informed me in perfect lawyer speak that I had repeatedly sent him messages with pornographic content. To make clear what he was writing about he had attached an example. He went on that he was no computer expert but that the technician of his office had informed him that I might be the victim of a worm, if that was the case, he advised me to remove the virus with the help of the link I should consider that it was probable that other people would receive the same obscenities from me. He didn’t have either the competence or the time to clarify the matter himself, so he ordered me to do it and threatened that if one more message of the kind arrived, he’d sue me. The ‘polizia informatica’ had the instruments to find the identity of the owner of an email address, even if it were a false name or one from abroad. I hope I don’t have to convince you that I did not send this gentleman or anyone else pornographic messages. I clicked on the link mentioning ‘spy ware’, but it didn’t work, that was odd. I googled spy ware and found the correct link but didn’t understand what I had to do. Then I thought of closing my email address and opening a new one before the internet police could prosecute me, but I couldn’t find a user name I liked. Every name I suggested was already used. Strangely - but as I know now fortunately - there was no attachment with the pornographic material I was supposed to have sent. Then a thought struck me: how did this Roman advocate know that I, a person with a German email address, could read and understand Italian? Did he know me? If so, from where? When my husband came home, he was as puzzled as I was. He composed a polite but also humorous letter in his mind which I was to send to the man telling him that I was completely innocent. Before I typed it, though, I went to my neighbour to tell him about the incident and to ask him about something I had had problems with lately and he said at once, “Don’t. Reply. At All!” He calmed me down and asked, “What are you afraid of? You haven’t sent the pornographic pages. If you had, it would show on your computer, but as you haven’t, there’s nothing to be afraid of.” He was convinced that it was a mean trick which would result in catching a virus or unknowingly subscribing to something expensive, maybe even pornographic material! I’m convinced that he’s right. I didn’t do anything with the email, but I looked through the Italian online telephone register if I could find the Roman lawyer there. I couldn’t. It’s possible to fill in the address, then one gets the information who has which telephone number in the house in question. I got the name of a jewellery shop. My husband called it and asked under some pretext if there was a legal office in the house. There wasn’t one and there had never been one. That’s my story, I hope it hasn’t only entertained you - the plight of other people is always entertaining - but also warned you not to act rashly if you’re puzzled. If you don’t know what to do, DO NOTHING!
22 people like this
13 responses
@xFiacre (5221)
• Ireland
10 Oct
@maluse I confidently delete any such nonsense that comes my way then forget about it. It is rather upsetting and unnerving to receive that kind of email which might sound kind of plausible, but when logic is applied to the situation (and you have loads of that) it becomes clear that it is nonsense, and potentially dangerous nonsense at that.
3 people like this
@MALUSE (43661)
• Uzbekistan
10 Oct
Thanks for the friendly words. The disturbing thing is that such criminals are successful because so many people are too greedy or simply too trusting.
3 people like this
@xFiacre (5221)
• Ireland
10 Oct
@MALUSE I’ve been getting another round of phone calls wanting my bank details so that someone can deposit large sums of money into my account. They are very kind to do such a thing, but I tell them I need to see their photo ID and that confuses them and they hang up.
2 people like this
@MALUSE (43661)
• Uzbekistan
10 Oct
@xFiacre I haven't got any phone calls for a long time by people who want to make me rich. I feel neglected. I liked the voices of eager young man who tried to talk me into buying shares for wheat at the stock market in New York. They were so enthusiastic and couldn't understand that I didn't want to swallow the worm.
3 people like this
@Corbin5 (116393)
• United States
10 Oct
Well, thank you for alerting us to this dastardly scam. Someone else here wrote about the same thing happening to him or her, but who that user happens to be escapes me.
3 people like this
@andriaperry (58938)
• Anniston, Alabama
10 Oct
Tony won 26,000,000 and a new GMC pickup truck. The lady called his telephone and told him, then told him to call her back and giver her a number that he was to write down. He told her she was full of it. Plus Tony has never gave his number out to anyone.
2 people like this
@MALUSE (43661)
• Uzbekistan
10 Oct
It's funny to learn that you've won something when you haven't taken part in a competition, isn't it?
2 people like this
@amadeo (73426)
• United States
10 Oct
Good advice which a lot do not do.i liked that.Do Nothing.Most people are curious and this is the down fall.They have to know.
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (67704)
• India
11 Oct
Threatening spam? Oh wow...I hardly open any mails other than those from specific people or companies..
1 person likes this
@CarolDM (2834)
• United States
14 Oct
Another scam to be worried about. Crazy world these days.
@MALUSE (43661)
• Uzbekistan
14 Oct
One must be really careful when emails from unknown senders arrive.
@Tampa_girl7 (26235)
• United States
12 Oct
Scams have become quite elaborate. Your neighbor gave you good advice.
@MALUSE (43661)
• Uzbekistan
12 Oct
Yes, I've learnt not to panic and not to believe strange messages.
1 person likes this
@theend (1957)
• Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
13 Oct
You are facing a situation of fraud, I always wary of any on the inbox.
• Croatia (Hrvatska)
11 Oct
Good advice. Ah, I also received some e-mails about being a person's friend and similar. Scams, viruses and all the rest
@TheHorse (72505)
• Walnut Creek, California
11 Oct
I've had it happen that my email was "pirated" and used to send nasty pictures to some...maybe on Bubbles. One recipient actually though I had sent the nasty pictures and scolded me! I explained that it wasn't me and then changed my email password. I suspect that your neighbor is right. This person wanted to capture your information or worse. I never open websites sent to me by possible scammers. To this day, I still get emails saying "I thought you might like this: (unknown link)," ostensibly from a known person. When I hit "replay" to the email (a safe thing, I think), the return address is NOT the one that the email supposedly came from.
@ZedSmart (2723)
• Philippines
11 Oct
This is horrible. It was just one of the prying eyes waiting to catch some prey. I also receive plenty of non sense e-mail and I just put in the trash bin immediately.
@JudyEv (134905)
• Bunbury, Australia
11 Oct
This seems to be one of the latest ploys in parting people from their money - not money in your case but some have been threatened with blackmail.
@pgntwo (22578)
• Tripoli, Libya
10 Oct
If there is one thing I am extremely good at, it's doing nothing. Good advice.