Great men will always be great

@JudyEv (147789)
Bunbury, Australia
January 11, 2019 5:34pm CST
Gough Whitlam (1916 to 2014) was Prime Minister of Australia from 1972 to 1975 before being controversially dismissed by the Governor-General Sir John Kerr. He was head of the Labour Party from 1967 to 1977 and led them to power for the first time in 23 years. He was what seems often missing from today’s politicians – a true leader and statesman. He always travelled economy and insisted his ministers did too. I don’t think too many do nowadays. He said this once at a cabinet meeting, which I thought gave food for thought. ‘I travel economy and I am a great man. I could travel economy for the rest of my life and I would still be a great man. But most of the people around this table' - and that was the cabinet - 'are pissants and they could travel first class for the rest of their life and they would still be pissants'. The definition of ‘pissant’ is ‘an insignificant or contemptible person or thing’. While I did say Whitlam was a leader and statesman, I didn’t say he was modest. The photo is of one of Western Australia’s premiers who I met once.
14 people like this
14 responses
@TRBRocks420 (88662)
• Banks, Oregon
11 Jan
I like that saying a great man will always be great.
5 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
I think it is very true too.
2 people like this
@RasmaSandra (21987)
• Daytona Beach, Florida
12 Jan
You are right if a man earns the right to be called great he will always be remembered like that.
4 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
And he will have enough self-confidence not to need to prove it to everyone.
2 people like this
@JohnRoberts (69946)
• Los Angeles, California
12 Jan
I guess a premiere is like a US state governor.
4 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
That would be right. He is head of his state. The Prime Minister is head of Australia then each state has its Premier.
2 people like this
@snowy22315 (58387)
• United States
12 Jan
sounds true enough..
4 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
Great men don't need to be seen as 'great'.
1 person likes this
@LadyDuck (195517)
• Switzerland
12 Jan
A few leaders still travel economy, but some do and those are the best and the greatest. They do not need to "show off" to let people know that they are great.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
And travelling first-class is okay for long trips, etc but some use tax-payers money for very short trips when really they could easily go economy.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (195517)
• Switzerland
12 Jan
@JudyEv I fully agree, not to mention when they use private jets when they could travel second class in a train.
2 people like this
@dya80dya (8941)
• Romania
11 Jan
I agree with this saying.
3 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
I think it is a very true saying.
1 person likes this
@innertalks (4843)
• Australia
15 Jan
“Let me make quite clear that I am for abortion and, in your case Sir, we should make it retrospective.” Gough Whitlam gave a lot of great answers out to hecklers too. He had a great sense of humour. This was Gough's answer to someone who had repeatedly asked him to outline his stance on abortion.
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
15 Jan
That is SO funny. Whitlam was certainly clever. Paul Keating was another very clever politician but I found him too cruel and obnoxious for my liking.
2 people like this
• Australia
15 Jan
@JudyEv Yes, I agree. Gough Whitlam was never mean spirited, as Paul Keating sometimes was. Great men are never mean-spirited I think.
2 people like this
• Australia
16 Jan
@Shiva49 Yes, I have seen that famous riposte before. It is a good reply, to be sure. Gough Whitlam also said this about Malcolm Fraser, I think, because Malcolm was also rather tall. Gough was just a shade taller though. "He is lofty, and I am eminent."
@Shiva49 (14673)
• Singapore
13 Jan
It is not easy to descend to mediocrity once one is used to a decent disposition. I have not changed my approach to life which is to live and let others live. Leaders should not forget they are also role models. Nice photo you have shared. I recall reading about this earlier - siva
2 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
13 Jan
I think for anyone in the public eye and used to a certain amount of adulation, it must be difficult for them to come down to the level of the ordinary citizen.
2 people like this
@Shiva49 (14673)
• Singapore
13 Jan
@JudyEv That reminds me of President Reagan when he was suffering from Alzheimer towards the end of his life. Ever gracious, he opened and held the door for a lady. She thanked him for being gracious. And his reply " that is part of my job". Yes, good manners stay as also the bad! siva
2 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
14 Jan
@Shiva49 That's a nice story.
2 people like this
@Courage7 (26413)
• United States
12 Jan
A great man it seems, a man of the people and of course they would dismiss someone that is good.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
Yes, the riffraff get very jealous of a true statesman and can't wait to get rid of him.
2 people like this
@Courage7 (26413)
• United States
12 Jan
@JudyEv So true Judy.
2 people like this
@Shavkat (69491)
• Philippines
12 Jan
It is only a few leaders can do great things to their people.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
Yes, some lead for a while then get replaced and are never heard of again.
2 people like this
@Shavkat (69491)
• Philippines
12 Jan
@JudyEv It happens here, too. I hope leaders can like them who have good intentions for the local people.
2 people like this
@allknowing (75409)
• India
12 Jan
If only our PM practiced what he preaches.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
13 Jan
They promise plenty when they are anxious to get elected. Then half the time they seem to forget those promises.
2 people like this
@ilocosboy (41791)
• Philippines
12 Jan
Elected officials should be like that, being humble to the things he do like riding econony. Too bad here in my country, they have the high end and luxurious car instead of common car.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
13 Jan
And it is the people who pay taxes that are paying for their extravagances.
2 people like this
@xFiacre (6564)
• Ireland
12 Jan
@judyev it’s a true saying that would have been better left unsaid, letting the greatness be expressed in modesty. Still, blowing one’s own trumpet isn’t the worst of sins, especially among the political classes.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
He truly had some vision for his people so I could forgive him his arrogance.
1 person likes this
@FourWalls (16980)
• United States
12 Jan
There’s a lot of truth to that. People seem to think that their clothes or their fancy car “makes” them great. That’s not true, it’s the type of person you are that makes you great....even if you live in the poorest part of town.
2 people like this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
The great people don't need to be continually proving it or reminding others of it.
2 people like this