Australians seem to value the truth much more than Americans!

@indexer (2598)
Leicester, England
January 11, 2019 6:38pm CST
An interesting survey has just been carried out that compared Australian attitudes to truth and lies with American ones. The researchers showed 450 people a set of statements by the leaders of Australia's two main political parties, most of these statements being factually false, but this was not disclosed to the subjects. The subjects were also asked about their political leanings and voting intentions. They were then shown the statements a second time, but told that they had been fact-checked as being mostly false. Attitudes towards the politicians changed markedly, whether the subjects had been favourably or unfavourably inclined towards the party leaders. Opinion of the leaders went markedly downhill. When the same experiment was conducted in the United States, with American subjects and statements by Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders, the result was very different. Being told that a statement was false made hardly any difference to the favourability score and voting intentions of the subjects. It turns out that Australians are ten times more likely to change their view of a politician who was been shown to be telling lies than an American is! In other words, it doesn't matter what garbage is thrown down the throats of American voters - once a politician has their loyalty, they have it for life, however many lies and factual untruths Donald, Bernie and the rest might tell!
7 people like this
8 responses
@RasmaSandra (21987)
• Daytona Beach, Florida
12 Jan
Guess Americans have been showing loyalty to many wrong people and that often gets everyone in trouble. Look at the political mess there is today if things had been different a lot of the problems that have cropped up would no have come up in the first place.
2 people like this
@indexer (2598)
• Leicester, England
12 Jan
I wonder if there is a connection here with the attitude of many Bible-believing Christians - of whom the US has a greater proportion than most other countries - who take the line that if a verse stated that two plus two equals five they would believe it?
2 people like this
@Namelesss (1921)
• Thomasville, Georgia
12 Jan
@indexer That very well may be the largest impact on Americans. The good news is the younger generations aren't buying into it.
1 person likes this
@xFiacre (6564)
• Ireland
12 Jan
@indexer This is a pleasing piece of research which I would like to see carried out in N.I.
2 people like this
@indexer (2598)
• Leicester, England
12 Jan
Now that would certainly be interesting!
@Namelesss (1921)
• Thomasville, Georgia
12 Jan
Oh I don't know, I think we do still value truth and the truth is no one here in America knows what that truth is. I'm sorry but there was a time when our newscasters could be depended on to tell the truth and just report the news. Now-a-days, they just talk and talk and talk and toss around opinions (their own and whoever they like) and all it does is muddy some already muddy waters. Seems they are all liars and even if they aren't someone out there has verifiable proof that they are. Horse-hockey.
1 person likes this
@indexer (2598)
• Leicester, England
12 Jan
You may have a point. One problem with American society is that just about everyone in public life has a political agenda. When the judiciary are subject to political appointments and are expected to be biased one way or the other, it is surely no surprise that the media are similarly skewed.
@Namelesss (1921)
• Thomasville, Georgia
12 Jan
@indexer True, I miss the days when we had real news casters. They told the news as it happened or soon as possible, kept their opinions to themselves and didn't worry about public opinion. I rarely get the chance to even hold the tv remote these days. When I do I tune in BBC for news.
1 person likes this
@indexer (2598)
• Leicester, England
13 Jan
@Namelesss The BBC is certainly my main source for news, and you will also get unbiased news from the terrestrial commercial channels in the UK. There is plenty of challenging interviewing on TV in the UK - which will always be open to accusations of bias on the part of any politician who has had a bad time as a result - but such broadcasts can be clearly distinguished from news bulletins.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
I would certainly view a confirmed liar with suspicion. We vote for a particular candidate in our district although he represents the party we don't really support. He is always working for his constituents and is a good, solid citizen so he gets our vote.
1 person likes this
@xFiacre (6564)
• Ireland
12 Jan
@judyev This pleasing study must make you honestly proud!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (147789)
• Bunbury, Australia
12 Jan
@xFiacre I hadn't really thought about it but I suppose that's so. I was more surprised that the 'other side' didn't change their views despite knowing their candidates had lied.
1 person likes this
• Edinburgh, Scotland
13 Jan
There is a saying in my country's capital city which goes: ''All fur coat and no knickers!'' meaning that it's all show and no substance which I think is a fair summation of the current state of American politics.
1 person likes this
@indexer (2598)
• Leicester, England
13 Jan
That's a very fair summary. That sounds like the Edinburgh version of "All mouth and no trousers"!
@Courage7 (26413)
• United States
12 Jan
Good job that me and mine are not any of those blind sheep then.
1 person likes this
@topffer (37139)
• France
12 Jan
The politician who never lied might throw stones to the liars.
1 person likes this
@Deepizzaguy (16414)
• Lake Charles, Louisiana
12 Jan
My late had a saying "People like to be fooled".