ORGANIZED YOUTH GROUPS - SCOUTS, 4H, YMCA, YWCA, ETC.

@gifana (4838)
Portugal
December 2, 2006 11:29am CST
Do you encourage or discourge your children to join. Boy/Girl Scouts, 4H clubs, YMCA/YWCA, Church Youth Groups, local youth clubs? I have no children but I would definitely encourage (but not push) them into joining a group or groups where they can be in touch with their peers and exchange ideas. I feel that it is definitely a way to "attack" the gangs that roam the streets in major cities and give the youths an alternative. Perhaps if more emphasis are placed on these groups gangs would disappear and the young people would have more to look forward to. Most of the groups I mentioned are aimed at making a better person and teaching our youth to grow up as good citizens paying respect not only to family members but to the population in general.
2 people like this
11 responses
@Pigglies (9339)
• United States
3 Dec 06
I don't like a lot of those clubs, so no, I wouldn't really encourage it. In fact, I think the 4H clubs especially are often guilty of teaching bad animal care to children. People who "learned" about guinea pig care or rabbit care from 4H groups generally have to be reeducated when they volunteer helping with guinea pigs and rabbits. And I've heard horror stories from people who've been in it years ago actually being sent home with needles and such for animal treatment, and using it to torture other children instead! I doubt kids are sent home nowadays with such things, but still! I was in the Girl Scouts for a brief time as well. I thought it was a very sexist group (even at age 8!). I could not stand making dolls for another minute and left. I wanted to join so I could shoot bows and arrows and go camping. Apparently, what I wanted to join was called the Boy Scouts.
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Dec 06
LOL on last remark. I never joined the 4H club but I had lots of friends you did. Both my grandfathers where part time farmers and kept some animals. Since I lived in the city it would have been difficult for me to join 4H. However, my friends enjoyed in and were so proud when they came back from the State Fair with their ribbons. Of as I said it was over 50 years ago and the social environment has certainly changed. We all know that any group, whatever it may be, is only as good as the adult leader. If the latter is not dedicated then it is more difficult for a young boy or girl to get much benefit. But I think it is unfair to judge the big picture by some isolated incidents. Thanks for coming by again, Pigglies always nice to hear you.
@Pigglies (9339)
• United States
5 Jan 07
With the 4H group, in Southern CA at least, there is a very large number of incidents where lessons have gone horribly wrong. I don't personally find them to be a very ethical group most of the time. However, I have met one leader out here that runs a very nice 4H group and doesn't harm animals to do it. The kids are all city kids who have no room for animals, so they volunteer with them instead as a group. So I agree, it has a lot to do with the leader! But I know this leader told me when she was working on a volunteer thing out here, that she has had to kind of go against the book sometimes because these are city kids and they can't have animals in apartments so they need unique ways to do these lessons.
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
5 Jan 07
That's a new twist on 4H that I hadn't heard. Nothing is perfect in this world unfortunately. I sometimes wonder why some people choose to mess up the good things. I hope I didn't offend you when I mentioned what you had said it wasn't meant in an offensive way only to site another side. Thanks for coming back again and giving us more input. Appreciate it.
• United States
3 Dec 06
My children were in the boy scouts and girl scouts. They chose to be members. When they decided to stop I didn't argue with them. They just said that they didn't like going to the meetings. I would like to see more youth organizations started in our towns and cities. I tire of driving down the street on any given night and see these youngsters walking up and down the street, or sitting on the curb or on the steps of a shop that has closed for the evening. They need something to do with their time.
• United States
3 Dec 06
I know Girl Scouts has special programs for at-risk kids. The leaders are paid staff members, so you don't have to worry about the parents who don't care. One of the big things said against the cookie sales is only 25 cents per box goes to the troop. Well, the rest goes to the Council to pay for programs like this. So, every time you buy a box of cookies, you are helping an at-risk child. If your Council does not have such programs, find out why and see what you can do to get one going.
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Dec 06
It's been over 50 years since I was a girl scout and I'm sure things are different...I think I sold GS cookies for 10 cents a box. But it's good to know about at risk girls. Yes it would be nice for more youth groups to be set up especially in those areas where there is violence and upheavel. I was thinking on my way back from the restaurant that perhaps the major TV networks could do more if they would allow announcements on the various groups to reach more parents as well as children. With all the millions they make in profits it wouldn't hurt them a bit to give some of it back to the people. And I am sure that any free publicity they gave the groups would be considered eligible for a tax deduction....as if they needed it. Thanks for coming back rose....you sure have added a lot of valuable info. God Bless
• United States
4 Dec 06
The fortunate thing about small town living is that there are no gangs here. We don't have anything for our young people to do. There have been several attempts to organize something but all have failed.
1 person likes this
@ossie16d (11834)
• Australia
3 Jan 07
Our son did not join any of these things, and that was his choice. We did live on a farm and were some distance from town, so we didn't have a problem of him wandering around the streets or anything like that. He had plenty to keep himself occupied and was encouraged to make or build things that he wanted. For instance he built a BMX track so he could ride his bike over, on and through all the mess he had there. It also kept him and his friends entertained for many hours. When he got older he modified that track into one for the motor bike. For a few years I was involved with the Army Cadets who met once a week, had about 6 week-end camps during the year as one Annual Camp of 8 days. Yes it was good and I found it interesting to see these teens develop into responsible young adults. Those who were in the unit for a couple of years at least did become good citizens who showed great maturity and respect to their peers, families and the community in general. They could join at 13, although we had the discretion to accept 12 year olds, and had to leave at 18.
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Jan 07
That's great. I assume that Australia doesn't have any equivalent to our 4H which is an agricultural based organization. I forget what the 4 H's are but I now that it is Head, Heart, Hands and I think the fourth one is Health but I'm not sure. It's an organization that teaches young people how to raise and care for animals and grow things. They are usually involved in State Fairs and the like that have awards for the various categories. The Army Cadets is probably based on a lot of Scouts ideas. The main things that as long as these youth organizations continue at least some of the youth of today will grow up to be better citizens and know the meaning of maturity and respect. Always nice to see you ossie....where you going on your next trip, or haven't you decided yet. Happy New Year, if I haven't already said it.
@ossie16d (11834)
• Australia
5 Jan 07
Yes Army Cadets here is a sort of junior military, but they learn so much more than that really. Also there is a fun element in it but for those who are interested they get a chance for promotion etc. Our next trip will be to Queensland and hopefully as far north as Ingham where I was born. It won't be till August though as our son is home till June (we hope) and then the young lad who looks after our dog while we are away will also be away in July. But as soon as his family returns home we are off. Already planning the trip and we will go up the inland trek and then back down the coast to near Brisbane and once again inland to home. Also a high possibility we will be visiting Coffs Harbour in October as there is a Reunion on there. :)
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
5 Jan 07
Sounds great. If I win the Euromillions Lottery tonight (in about 2 hours) Ill be on the first flight out after I receive my check and tag along behind....renting a car and chasing you. hehehehehehe
• United States
3 Dec 06
Definitely encourage your kids to join. Don't force them because then they will get nothing out of it. But, if they join of their own free will, it is an experience they will remember forever. Once they do join, be there to help. Don't run things if you are not the leader, but help the leader as much as you can. You would be amazed what working moms can do if they just change their priorities a tad (don't dust one Saturday to chaperone a field trip. Trust me your kids will never talk about how clean the house was, but will talk about whether you went on activities with them). Also, even if you don't have kids, you can help these groups out. It may take a little perseverence to get in because most parents come with kids, but if you are reliable, they will find a place for you. Just think of the difference you can make in a kid's life by helping out.
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Dec 06
THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR STOPPING IN AND GIVING THAT MAGNIFICENT RESPONSE.......BEST RESPONSE HAD BEEN NOTED. How wonderfully informing. If the other responders do nothing but read this comment, my reward for the posting is fulfilled. My problem is that I have nothing to add. You have left me speechless. Again thanks so much for dropping by and giving others something to think about.
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
4 Dec 06
rose, not sure you'll be coming back but I have a question? Do Girl Scouts have anything like the be Jamboree that the boys have. I think this is marvelous. I remember a cousin of my went to one out west in the 60's and he had a wonderful time. Met so many boys from other countries and had souviners that he cherished.
• United States
4 Dec 06
Girl Scouts in the US does not really. Various groups will have get togethers and anyone can come, but they are not something where everyone in the whole country plans on showing up. Girl Scouts and Girl Guides in other countries do have this, as well as international jamborees. The closest we come is every 5 years is the Sing-A-Long on the National Mall to celebrate the GS Birthday. It is held in June and the next one is June 2007. More information is available on the GS- Nation's Capitol Website which is accessible through the GSUSA website (gsusa.org). This is the 95th. The next one in 5 years in 2012 is our grand 100th Anniversary.
@ChewySpree (1834)
• United States
3 Dec 06
I agree completely. I don't (yet) have children but I have fond memories of the Hi-Y (the youth arm of the YMCA/YWCA here) and 4-H from my childhood. I think these and similar organizations do give children a good alternative to the street. You know what they say about idle hands, and it's true. If children get bored, they're bound to get into trouble.
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Dec 06
I forgot about the Hi-Y. Prevention is better than the cure. I feel that when the youth of today are in a warm, friendly "competitive environment, even only one night a week, it molds their being. Earning badges, or prizes at the fair, or whatever gives them a sense of pride that they may not get at home. From most of my friends when I was a scout and from some of my friends childrens I see a difference in those that belong to youth groups and those that dont. Especially in how they act in their own home. Those who didnt are somewhat unruly and disrespectively and their parents were on tenterhooks as to what they were going to do with the child. Youth groups, I believe, helps to overcome and runs hand in hand with family life. Boy, when I get wound up I become overbearing. Sorry bout dat. Thanks for coming by once again and as always with good ideas.
• United States
4 Dec 06
No need to apologize at all, Gifana. I agree with what you're saying and like how you phrased your point.
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
4 Dec 06
Thanks, yu is 2 nice||
@claudia413 (4284)
• United States
5 Jan 07
When I was growing up (in the olden days...LOL), I was a member of the Brownies and then the Girl Scouts. Most of my friends were also in them with me. I also had a group of friends through my church youth group that met on Sunday evenings. Although we lived in Miami, FL, we had 4-H available through our schools since so much of Miami in the 50's was still agricultural. Since I lived in the city itself, I didn't join 4-H, but I did help a friend plant onions at her parents' farm one summer. She offered us $1 a row, so a bunch of us jumped at the chance. The joke was on us. The rows seemed to be about a mile long, and we soon tired of the bending and stooping. When my kids were growing up, my daughter was in the Girl Scouts for a few years, but she wasn't as involved as I was. My son was involved in all kinds of sports, and it helped that his dad was a city league coach. So far, none of my grandchildren have joined any group other than their church youth group. They do have plenty of activities through their schools and church and are not permitted to just roam the streets. The groups you mentioned do a good job of teaching kids to be good citizens and treat others with respect.
1 person likes this
@crystal8577 (1470)
• United States
4 Jan 07
My girls are normally a part of girl scouts. We took a break this year becuase I was pregnant & it was hard to do the meetings & such. We do not have 4-H around us, but my sisters were in it for years. There really is not much in the area that I know of for youth groups. I am sure my girls will become involved in more as they get older. The oldest 2 are 7 1/2 & almost 6. They are in sports & various other classes though (gardening, cooking & such).
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
4 Jan 07
It is so comforting that there are parents who are still interested in their children widening their horizons with youth groups of any kind that seek the betterment of the youth of any nation. And when youth of individual countries join together in jubilees and the like it widens their horizons even further. My point is that we must have parents who are concerned and willing to help in any way whether it be adult leaders or encouragement givers to their children. Thanks so very much for your dropping by and for your valuable input.
@donglory (677)
• Ghana
3 Jan 07
i think we have to encourage children to join this group
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Jan 07
Encouragement is good, persisting can be harmful in the long run. Thanks for dropping by.
@wvchell78 (564)
• United States
3 Jan 07
I plan to make my sons aware of all of the options available to them. I will talk to them about cub & boy scouts and all of the different youth groups and sports that they are open to. I think it will be a great experience for them to be involved.
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Jan 07
Well put. Encourage but not push. Of course, it always helps if some of their friends join and they want to keep the "gang" together. Thanks for dropping by and for your input.
• India
3 Dec 06
scouts
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Dec 06
Ok. It wasn't a matter of choice but you get credit for your posting. Thanks for drooping by.
@cr1st1nel (3567)
• Romania
3 Dec 06
I would encourage my children to join a group it will form him and prepare for the hard life which stays in front of it
1 person likes this
@gifana (4838)
• Portugal
3 Dec 06
I feel that the youth groups that I have mentioned are meant to build character, loyalty, patriotism and respect, among other things. Perhaps most youth join because they have a friend there and want to share the experience. A lot of parents never belonged so that had no reason to encourage their children. As for the hard life....I commented on another topic....life is like a sewer you get out of it only what you put into it. I didn't have an easy life per se....I had the necessities of life...but once I got on my own I did my best to compete with the best. When I lost one battle, I opened up another front and continued the war. Sure, it was a struggle, but I don't consider it hard....I like to consider life more as a challenge. I remember as a Scout some of the badges I earned were very difficult and challenging. If you don't know very much about Scouts, in particular, may I suggest that you read up on it...You may find the advantages that will help you in rearing your child....Thanks for dropping by and you interest.