What kind of a child do you create if ...

@HerShe (2386)
Canada
September 16, 2006 11:06am CST
What are the benefits of knowing child development?
6 responses
2 Oct 06
I think child development courses or just education about the actual practical side to parenting would be a good idea to have in schools and readily available out of them. I realise there’s many child development courses although they’re seen as something for someone who strives to ‘look after’ children rather than for those who’ll have their own and may deter parents from taking them up. I consider myself an open-minded diplomatic sort of person which maybe beneficial to the ‘physiological development’ of a child however it’s the little points of parenthood I’d concern myself with such as good discipline, and the healthy nutrients children need at early ages, down to the most basic of putting a nappy on. Alot of people don't have their family around them through early parenting and miss out on alot of helpful hints/tips. I think it could only be benificial to the child and parent to go through some form of child development courses, although that's not say someone who has gone without isn't neccessarily a good parent.
1 person likes this
@HerShe (2386)
• Canada
4 Oct 06
It is ironic that we need a license to drive a vehicle but nothing to to raise a child. Actually, where I live, and in many places, you do need a license to care for children. When my daycare patrner had her second child, we had to get an Infant/Toddler License so she could have her own infant in her own daycare. Now, how ridiculous is that. In the end it worked out alright. We just grew the business.
@HerShe (2386)
• Canada
4 Oct 06
Lackingstyle, Hi, I think you must have written this awhile ago and I just found it. Anyway, I like your idea of child development courses in schools. Somewhere I have heard that teens are given computerized infants, as part of their family skills courses or such. These 'babies' record everything; when feeding took place, if it was changed and when, the length of time it was left to cry before being attended to, etc.; a complete record of this 'baby'. They also have a class that goes with this excersise. I think I lean towards the psychological development moe that anything else. I think all high schools should have this. You are soooo right when you say that just because a person has been educated, doesn't mean that will use their knowledge. We had a woman come to us throught a practicum program. She had many child-related letters after her name. We tolerated her waiting for her start to use her skills. We tried to model appropriate behavior skill. In both our opinions, this woman should never be with children. Well, It's been another slice. Later
@chihouse (213)
• United States
4 Oct 06
I don't beleive that a person needs a 'license' to raise a child. I think that forcing a person to do certain steps would take away certain freedoms in the U.S. I am a certified child care provider in Illinois. I don't have my degree in Early Childhood though and I don't intend on getting it in Early Childhood. the reason why is the first class I took related to the field seemed to being the brain washing steps of what " good parenting " is and isn't. as it was presented to me the field avocates accusing parents of abuse and neglect ( before proper investigation)and administering all " over active" little boys ritilin. and I don't advocate that. Since I've been around children all my life ( I'm the oldest of 14) I am biased as to how these "professionals" who usually don't have children of their own could possibly know what is best for the raising of a child. I say read some books and all that, because from a theritical aspect they are true and then hang around some family and friends and their kids and see for yourself. add that together and you are set. just remember that all the planning in the world will not fully equipt you for parenthood.
@chihouse (213)
• United States
5 Oct 06
I would like to know under what authority do you act in trying to get everyone to see things your way? I wonder if all that schooling went to your head? and I wonder if you've had children of your own and or siblings that you helped raise? you're question of knowing about child development is a bit open and allows for many to take different views. I see that you are also very anal about spelling etc and have a low tolerance for human error. I would not want my child to be in a development program that was so focused on "perfection" that it leaves out the human condition. losen up and live a little. with all that training you should know that all the books and classes and degrees won't help if the child is born with a rare aliment. but it will take patience, love, gentleness (human qualities) to continue to be a parent to the child you can 'read up" but all the learning should never take place of basic human interaction. this is just my theory.
@katyzzz (2902)
• Australia
17 Dec 06
So you don't push a child beyond its capacities
• United States
27 Sep 06
I had my first when I was 18, but by then I had known a lot about children of all ages. I babysat all the time for children ages 2 months to 10 years old. It is nice to know a bit about children before you have one, but as stated above, babies and children do not come with instruction manuels and even if you know what you think is everything, you always come accross something new.
@Aali311 (6127)
• United States
27 Sep 06
It helps alot I think, when it comes to raising kids or working with them.
@chalmette69 (3010)
• United States
27 Sep 06
I think if you are planning to have a child it is a good idea to know something about how to take care of a child and what to exspect. The benefits would be you will be a little a head of the game, but how to raise children can't really be found in a book, you learn as it goes.