UNO

India
December 7, 2006 2:25am CST
is UNO wholly controlled only by USA- discuss
2 responses
• India
8 Dec 06
WASHINGTON: The U.S-India nuclear agreement is headed for a tense, fingernail-biting finale. Both sides say they have all but ironed out the last remaining wrinkles but the final unified legislation has not been revealed or voted in Congress whose clock is winding down, all because of one "obstructionist" lawmaker. Democrats held House Majority Leader, Republican John Boehner, responsible for the delay, saying he ordered House conferees to walk away from the table while he "tried to inject several utterly unrelated provisions (having to do with visas and Millennium Challenge funding)" into the proceedings. Democrats also blamed the White House for not picking up the phone to tell "its (Republican) rubber-stamp" to stop holding the bill up. They denied that Democrat Congressman Tom Lantos' insistence on an Iran related provision was cause for wrangles leading to the delay. In New Delhi, U.S Undersecretary of State Nicholas Burns expressed confidence that there would be no last minute hitch and said the bill would be voted on in the next 36 hours. "I anticipate a very successful and supportive bill, which will be well within the parameters of the agreement reached between President Bush and Prime Minister Singh have set,'' Burns said after talks with Indian officials. In Washington, the nuclear legislation jostled with a host of other bills as floor managers struggled to clear the backlog before Congress retires this weekend. Lawmakers rushed to pile on their pet projects and peeves into the process in the remaining life of the 109th Congress. Indian officials maintained there were no insurmountable issues in the nuke bill and most hitches had been cleared. But they withheld celebration pending publication of the final version of the unified legislation that will go to the President for signature. The impression Congressional insiders and officials gave in cautious comments was that deal-breaking conditions in the bill had been considerably softened and modulated to meet India's concerns. 1|2|Next Related Stories Japan to support Indo-US N-deal: Report 'Why is PM lobbying a senator?' Nuclear Bill will be law in 36 hours: Burns In Audio: Indo-US nuclear deal in final stages Special Coverage: Indo-US N-deal WASHINGTON: The U.S-India nuclear agreement is headed for a tense, fingernail-biting finale. Both sides say they have all but ironed out the last remaining wrinkles but the final unified legislation has not been revealed or voted in Congress whose clock is winding down, all because of one "obstructionist" lawmaker. Democrats held House Majority Leader, Republican John Boehner, responsible for the delay, saying he ordered House conferees to walk away from the table while he "tried to inject several utterly unrelated provisions (having to do with visas and Millennium Challenge funding)" into the proceedings. Democrats also blamed the White House for not picking up the phone to tell "its (Republican) rubber-stamp" to stop holding the bill up. They denied that Democrat Congressman Tom Lantos' insistence on an Iran related provision was cause for wrangles leading to the delay. In New Delhi, U.S Undersecretary of State Nicholas Burns expressed confidence that there would be no last minute hitch and said the bill would be voted on in the next 36 hours. "I anticipate a very successful and supportive bill, which will be well within the parameters of the agreement reached between President Bush and Prime Minister Singh have set,'' Burns said after talks with Indian officials. In Washington, the nuclear legislation jostled with a host of other bills as floor managers struggled to clear the backlog before Congress retires this weekend. Lawmakers rushed to pile on their pet projects and peeves into the process in the remaining life of the 109th Congress. Indian officials maintained there were no insurmountable issues in the nuke bill and most hitches had been cleared. But they withheld celebration pending publication of the final version of the unified legislation that will go to the President for signature. The impression Congressional insiders and officials gave in cautious comments was that deal-breaking conditions in the bill had been considerably softened and modulated to meet India's concerns. 1|2|Next Related Stories Japan to support Indo-US N-deal: Report 'Why is PM lobbying a senator?' Nuclear Bill will be law in 36 hours: Burns In Audio: Indo-US nuclear deal in final stages Special Coverage: Indo-US N-deal WASHINGTON: The U.S-India nuclear agreement is headed for a tense, fingernail-biting finale. Both sides say they have all but ironed out the last remaining wrinkles but the final unified legislation has not been revealed or voted in Congress whose clock is winding down, all because of one "obstructionist" lawmaker. Democrats held House Majority Leader, Republican John Boehner, responsible for the delay, saying he ordered House conferees to walk away from the table while he "tried to inject several utterly unrelated provisions (having to do with visas and Millennium Challenge funding)" into the proceedings. Democrats also blamed the White House for not picking up the phone to tell "its (Republican) rubber-stamp" to stop holding the bill up. They denied that Democrat Congressman Tom Lantos' insistence on an Iran related provision was cause for wrangles leading to the delay. In New Delhi, U.S Undersecretary of State Nicholas Burns expressed confidence that there would be no last minute hitch and said the bill would be voted on in the next 36 hours. "I anticipate a very successful and supportive bill, which will be well within the parameters of the agreement reached between President Bush and Prime Minister Singh have set,'' Burns said after talks with Indian officials. In Washington, the nuclear legislation jostled with a host of other bills as floor managers struggled to clear the backlog before Congress retires this weekend. Lawmakers rushed to pile on their pet projects and peeves into the process in the remaining life of the 109th Congress. Indian officials maintained there were no insurmountable issues in the nuke bill and most hitches had been cleared. But they withheld celebration pending publication of the final version of the unified legislation that will go to the President for signature. The impression Congressional insiders and officials gave in cautious comments was that deal-breaking conditions in the bill had been considerably softened and modulated to meet India's concerns. 1|2|Next Related Stories Japan to support Indo-US N-deal: Report 'Why is PM lobbying a senator?' Nuclear Bill will be law in 36 hours: Burns In Audio: Indo-US nuclear deal in final stages Special Coverage: Indo-US N-deal WASHINGTON: The U.S-India nuclear agreement is headed for a tense, fingernail-biting finale. Both sides say they have all but ironed out the last remaining wrinkles but the final unified legislation has not been revealed or voted in Congress whose clock is winding down, all because of one "obstructionist" lawmaker. Democrats held House Majority Leader, Republican John Boehner, responsible for the delay, saying he ordered House conferees to walk away from the table while he "tried to inject several utterly unrelated provisions (having to do with visas and Millennium Challenge funding)" into the proceedings. Democrats also blamed the White House for not picking up the phone to tell "its (Republican) rubber-stamp" to stop holding the bill up. They denied that Democrat Congressman Tom Lantos' insistence on an Iran related provision was cause for wrangles leading to the delay. In New Delhi, U.S Undersecretary of State Nicholas Burns expressed confidence that there would be no last minute hitch and said the bill would be voted on in the next 36 hours. "I anticipate a very successful and supportive bill, which will be well within the parameters of the agreement reached between President Bush and Prime Minister Singh have set,'' Burns said after talks with Indian officials. In Washington, the nuclear legislation jostled with a host of other bills as floor managers struggled to clear the backlog before Congress retires this weekend. Lawmakers rushed to pile on their pet projects and peeves into the process in the remaining life of the 109th Congress. Indian officials maintained there were no insurmountable issues in the nuke bill and most hitches had been cleared. But they withheld celebration pending publication of the final version of the unified legislation that will go to the President for signature. The impression Congressional insiders and officials gave in cautious comments was that deal-breaking conditions in the bill had been considerably softened and modulated to meet India's concerns. 1|2|Next Related Stories Japan to support Indo-US N-deal: Report 'Why is PM lobbying a senator?' Nuclear Bill will be law in 36 hours: Burns In Audio: Indo-US nuclear deal in final stages Special Coverage: Indo-US N-deal WASHINGTON: The U.S-India nuclear agreement is headed for a tense, fingernail-biting finale. Both sides say they have all but ironed out the last remaining wrinkles but the final unified legislation has not been revealed or voted in Congress whose clock is winding down, all because of one "obstructionist" lawmaker. Democrats held House Majority Leader, Republican John Boehner, responsible for the delay, saying he ordered House conferees to walk away from the table while he "tried to inject several utterly unrelated provisions (having to do with visas and Millennium Challenge funding)" into the proceedings. Democrats also blamed the White House for not picking up the phone to tell "its (Republican) rubber-stamp" to stop holding the bill up. They denied
@nuel_h (1593)
• Indonesia
7 Dec 06
i think uno is worldwide organization and maybe it is for the best for us to control it untill another country came and work it together with us. hope this help/