Should I tell my son that there is a Santa?

United States
December 11, 2006 6:58pm CST
Does this tach them about goodness? Or is this just another way that we lie to our children and allow them to live in never never land?
6 responses
@suedarr (2382)
• Canada
12 Dec 06
I would rather my kids live in never never land when they are small as they will have plenty of time to deal with the harsh realities of life as they get older. Plus who says Santa is not real??? Check this out. I thought it was cute .. :) Don’t believe in Santa Claus? If you’re skeptical of Santa’s abilities to deliver presents to millions of homes and children in just one night, North Carolina State University’s Dr. Larry Silverberg, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, can explain the plausible science and engineering principles that could allow the Jolly Old Elf to pull off the magical feat year after year. With his cherubic smile and twinkling eyes, Santa may appear to be merely a jolly old soul but he and his North Pole elves have a lot going on under the funny-looking hats, Silverberg says. Their advanced knowledge of electromagnetic waves, the space/time continuum, nanotechnology, genetic engineering and computer science easily trumps the know-how of contemporary scientists. Silverberg says that Santa has a personal pipeline to children’s thoughts – via a listening antenna that combines technologies currently used in cell phones and EKGs – which informs him that Mary in Miami hopes for a surfboard, while Michael from Minneapolis wants a snowboard. A sophisticated signal processing system filters the data, giving Santa clues on who wants what, where children live, and even who’s been bad or good. Later, all this information will be processed in an onboard sleigh guidance system, which will provide Santa with the most efficient delivery route. Silverberg adds that letters to Santa via snail mail still get the job done, however. Silverberg is not so naïve as to think that Santa and his reindeer can travel approximately 200 million square miles – making stops in some 80 million homes – in one night. Instead, he posits that Santa uses his knowledge of the space/time continuum to form what Silverberg calls “relativity clouds.” “Based on his advanced knowledge of the theory of relativity, Santa recognizes that time can be stretched like a rubber band, that space can be squeezed like an orange and that light can be bent,” Silverberg says. “Relativity clouds are controllable domains – rips in time – that allow him months to deliver presents while only a few minutes pass on Earth. The presents are truly delivered in a wink of an eye.” With a detailed route prepared and his list checked twice through the onboard computer on the technologically advanced sleigh, Santa is ready to deliver presents. His reindeer – genetically bred to fly, balance on rooftops and see well in the dark – don’t actually pull a sleigh loaded down with toys. Instead, each house becomes Santa’s workshop as he utilizes a nano-toymaker to fabricate toys inside the children’s homes. The presents are grown on the spot, as the nano-toymaker creates – atom by atom – toys out of snow and soot, much like DNA can command the growth of organic material like tissues and body parts. And there’s really no need for Santa to enter the house via chimney, although Silverberg says he enjoys doing that every so often. Rather, the same relativity cloud that allows Santa to deliver presents in what seems like a wink of an eye is also used to “morph” Santa into people’s homes. Finally, many people wonder how Santa and the reindeer can eat all the food left out for them. Silverberg says they take just a nibble at each house. The remainder is either left in the house or placed in the sleigh’s built-in food dehydrator, where it is preserved for future consumption. It takes a long time to deliver all those presents, after all. “This is our vision of Santa’s delivery method, given the human, physical and engineering constraints we face today,” Silverberg says. “Children shouldn’t put too much credence in the opinions of those who say it’s not possible to deliver presents all over the world in one night. It is possible, and it’s based on plausible science.” http://news.ncsu.edu/releases/2006/dec/212.html
• Ireland
12 Dec 06
Thanks for the clarification! Not everything is quite clear, but I can get my kids to explain it to me!
• Romania
12 Dec 06
Yes of course tell your child about Santa he will have something in what to belive, tell him that Santa brings gifts only to good children u ll see that he will try to be good only to get a nice Christmas gift.You will se the joy in his eyes when he will see the gifts from Santa. Is nothing wrong to tell him the story of Santa.
• United States
12 Dec 06
YES! Tell them about santa! I would be crushed if mom never told me the story of santa. It gives them hope and excitement about christmas. It's fun for them.
@leese29 (341)
• United States
12 Dec 06
I don't feel guilty at all. To see how excited they get Christmas morning seeing stuff Santa brought them. Plus we leave out cookies and milk every Christmas Eve and my son gets so excited to see it gone int he morning. It is all for fun and enjoyment. Let them be kids.
@deeeky (3667)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
12 Dec 06
Millions of children look forward to santa every year. It doesn't matter if true or not. It adds magic to the Xmas spirit. All the best for the festive season and a great New Year.
@prncesssly (1375)
• United States
12 Dec 06
I don't think there's anything wrong in letting children believe there is a santa claus. It's just part of growing up (in my opinion). You're not really lying to them... I guess Children just get a thrill from knowing that there's this guy, Santa who knows them and gets them what they want for Christmas. There's no harm in that.