Cross-eyed and dyslexia

@cuddiluk (1523)
Philippines
December 12, 2006 2:55am CST
If you're cross-eyed and have dyslexia, can you read all right?
5 responses
@dhaeo_09 (1007)
• Philippines
22 Dec 06
I think cross-eyed people can read in spite of having two images that can see to an object. But if a cross-eyed and dyslexic person cannot read no matter what you will do to him unless you will support him to go to a theraphy.
@Pigglies (9340)
• United States
22 Dec 06
I think a lot of people believe that dyslexia is reading backwards. I've always heard that one joke about the dyslexic agnostic who stays up at night pondering the existance of Dog. For me, it's more that I go with the shape of the words. Words also sometimes blur and move on the page, especially on bright white paper. Yellowed out books don't cause as much of a problem for me on moving words at least. But I've noticed in driving, my biggest problem words are: nOrTH and sOuTH (looks the same to me! resulted in a lot of turning around on freeways!), and eaST and weST can also cause the same problem. Street signs of similar length and word shape are also easily confused. I go to the eye doctor and end up with glasses far too strong because I can see everything clearly exept for reading and words and letters. I easily confuse some letters for others. But I don't have much of a problem with reading backwards. A d and b might confuse me, and if I write with both hands at once, once always goes backwards, but other than that I don't read or write backwards, just different.
@msqtech (15226)
• United States
12 Dec 06
I think they may be a little misunderstood here. I dont think one would cancel the other. It may be fun to watch though
@beckyomg1 (6761)
• United States
12 Dec 06
no that is not the reason to help dyslexia. it is much more than that. my son has dyslexia, and it is a reading problem, it is not just seeing words in a diffrent manner, it is awhole bunch of things, it is not knowing the phonics and not being able to distingush the words.
@swarn47 (1707)
• India
12 Dec 06
Dyslexia Definition Dyslexia is an unexpected impairment in reading and spelling despite a normal intellect. Description Dyslexia was first described by Hinshelwood in 1896. Orton originally hypothesized that dyslexia results from a dysfunction in visual memory and visual perception due to a delayment in maturation. Most dyslexics also display poor writing ability. Dyslexia is a classical primary reading disorder and should be differentiated from secondary disorders such as mental retardation, educational or environmental deprivation, or physical/organic diseases. The disorder results as a combination of genetic and environmental causes, which can induce variations in the behavioral, cognitive, and physiological measures related to reading disability. Dyslexia was previously called congenital word blindness. Dyslexia is a reading disorder, not caused by lowered motivation, inadequate learning opportunity or any overt neurological disability. Reading is a complex process which involves multiple systems to process the information cognitively and physiologically. In simple terms reading typically begins with a visual sensation stimuli and processing the text via the visual pathway in the brain (from the retina in the eye, the impulse goes in the brain to the lateral geniculate nuclei and primary visual cortex, the occipital lobe, located in the back of the head, which functions to process and integrate incoming visormation). Input information from vision is probably integrated with other neuronal systems that include language-specific rules, learned information and symbolic images into components of language thinking related to reading. Reading-related thinking is correlated with high activity in the left-hemisphere cortical regions, and language processing centers in the brain. Additionally, learning to read is also related to the learning process, which is mediated by the cerebellum and on relay feedback mechanisms between related areas of the brain. Source: http://www.answers.com/dyslexia?initiator=IE7:SearchBox SYMPTOMS OF DYSLEXIA inability to associate symbols with sounds and vice versa frequent word guessing confusion with verbal instructions without visual cues confused handedness difficulty sequencing items slow, soft spoken reading frequent mispronounciation of words when reading misperception of words, letters, and numbers moving or disappearing on a written page