What is your opinion on stem cell

United States
December 22, 2006 4:40am CST
My mother in law has MS and it is slowly attacking every part of her body. She cannot walk or move her legs her hands are getting worse to where she can't write legibly, it is so sad to see her go through this. She has tried almost every medical treatment available. Everywhere from chemotherapy to Bee Stings and just recently she went out of the country to have a stem cell transplant. What is supposed to happen is the blank cells that are preserved from an umbilical cord regrow in the areas of your body that have been damaged. She hasn't seen any significant changes, but it is still early. There is a possibility that she could actually be able to walk again. Why our government will not approve it I do not know. There are many people with MS and other conditions that have received stem cells and have made significant progress. Do a google search for a man named Malcolm Pear and read his story. It is such a miracle and the US government has made it illegal! What are your opinions about stem cell?
4 people like this
9 responses
• United States
26 Dec 06
I think that we should be able to do stem cell research. I don't know what our governments problem is. I just don't get their way of thinking.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Dec 06
Their way of thinking? I would say money!
@Melizzy (1381)
• United States
26 Dec 06
I too have MS and I take a daily injection for the disease. I am for stem cells even though most doctor's agree stem cells won't really help MS patients. Or at least that's what my doctor said and she's pro-stem cell. There is so much good we could do with this science. Think of all the cures we could have and how much money we could save!
• United States
26 Dec 06
Did you search the net for Malcolm Pear? I think that is something you should read if you haven't already. I appreciate your response and hope your MS does not progress as quickly as my mother in laws'.
• Egypt
22 Dec 06
Stem cells culture - Stem cells culture
Stem cells culture is a new opening in medicine and some scientists tended to it being very amazing but others did not. My private opinion is that this new method of treatment & curing is a private school in medicine which has its own fellowers of physicians & scientists like other schools of medicine, so, in my opinion, all medicine schools & concepts must cooperate very deeply for the sake of human treatment and better human health, as not only one school can do this lonely ( alone ) but all must be one hand and not hinder each other.
• United States
23 Dec 06
Thanks for the reply1
@suryachalla (1370)
• India
13 Jan 07
By MS, do you mean Multiple Sclerosis? I hear it is excruciatingly painful. I am awfully sorry for her & you. I have a co-brother-in-law (he's actually my Godfather), who is 67 and suffering from eroded cartilages, which are responsible for helping knee function. If he stands he is afraid of sitting or sleeping because getting up with worn out knee joints is also terrible painful and it is painful for kith and kin to watch. Recently, he started complaining that he was unable to go to the college on scooter, which needs a kick-start(and he is unable to do it!)Moreover, he's a great person, and one of the kindest & gentlest persons I've ever known. I feel awful knowing that something can be done for his ailment using stemcell technology. But it is new & gaining in momentum in India. It is also prohibitively expensive for us middle class Indians. According to the latest results, stemcell (medical) technology is the most promising way to tackle hitherto believed as ‘incurable’ conditions such as cancer, arthritis, asthma, liver and kidney failure, and so on. Now I hear that doctors are achieving even better results using amniotic fluids during delivery. There is a stemcell bank called ‘life cell’ in India. Parent’s can put their new-born baby’s stemcells (taken from the umbilical cord at the time of birth) in cold storage there. In later life, when the child grows up and develops life-threatening disorders/conditions, these same stemcells in the bank would help him recover dramatically! At least future generations have some hope!
@rhodilee (114)
• Philippines
27 Dec 06
Those opposed against stem cell research argue that it entails killing human embryos but embryos used in stem cell research come as surplus embryos from in vitro fertilization (IVF) where most of them are bound to be discarded. Instead of being discarded for nothing, it would be best to USE these embryos in stem cell research. You may know more about stem cell research by visiting these links: http://www.religioustolerance.org/res_stem.htm http://questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101272472
• United States
28 Dec 06
That is a very good point. If I understand it right the cells are actually extracted from the umbilical cord of an unborn fetus, no human beings are actually harmed in the process.
@gewcew23 (8011)
• United States
27 Dec 06
I don't have a problem with adult stem cell research where they take stem cells from adults and I don't have a problem when children are born taking the stem cells from the umbilical cord. I just don't agree with taking an embro and using it for stem cell research. I know that this is my opinion and you may not agree with me as I might not agree with you but please respect my opinion and I will respect yours.
• United States
28 Dec 06
Absolutely. And actually I never said that I was for using embryos for stem cell research. They should probably not harvest embryos to use them for testing, but the embryos from abortions and such should not have to be wasted when they could be used to benefit medical research. And I dont know if adults have stem cells, the way I understand it is that stem cells are blank cells and I dont understand how an adult would have blank cells. But I could be wrong. Anyone know?
• India
26 Dec 06
none wht so ever
• United States
26 Dec 06
if I were mylot and I had to rate this response, it would not be very pretty. You wrote 4 words and even mispelled one of them. Wow.
@suryachalla (1370)
• India
13 Jan 07
Dr. Antony Atala in his stem cell research lab - Dr.Anthony Atala, head of Wake Forest's regenerative medicine institute, is photographed in his research lab at Piedmont Triad Research Park in Winston-Salem, NC, Friday, Jan. 5, 2007. Scientists reported Sunday they had found a plentiful source of stem cells in the fluid that cushions babies in the womb and produced a variety of tissue types from these cells _ sidestepping the controversy over destroying embryos for research. Researchers at Wake Forest University and Harvard University reported the stem cells they drew from amniotic fluid donated by pregnant women hold much the same promise as embryonic stem cells.
By MS, do you mean Multiple Sclerosis? I hear it is excruciatingly painful. I am awfully sorry for her & you. I have a co-brother-in-law (he's actually my Godfather), who is 67 and suffering from eroded cartilages, which are responsible for helping knee function. If he stands he is afraid of sitting or sleeping because getting up with worn out knee joints is also terrible painful and it is painful for kith and kin to watch. Recently, he started complaining that he was unable to go to the college on scooter, which needs a kick-start(and he is unable to do it!)Moreover, he's a great person, and one of the kindest & gentlest persons I've ever known. I feel awful knowing that something can be done for his ailment using stemcell technology. But it is new & gaining in momentum in India. It is also prohibitively expensive for us middle class Indians. According to the latest results, stemcell (medical) technology is the most promising way to tackle hitherto believed as ‘incurable’ conditions such as cancer, arthritis, asthma, liver and kidney failure, and so on. Now I hear that doctors are achieving even better results using amniotic fluids during delivery. There is a stemcell bank called ‘life cell’ in India. Parent’s can put their new-born baby’s stemcells (taken from the umbilical cord at the time of birth) in cold storage there. In later life, when the child grows up and develops life-threatening disorders/conditions, these same stemcells in the bank would help him recover dramatically!Last year, the governor of Maryland, USA, included $20 million in his state annual budget proposal for stem cell research but insisted grants be available for work on adult stem cells, if scientists found it promising!In 2004, New Jersey governor planned to spend $6.5 million a year over the next 5 years, California hoped for $300 million a year. I don't know if these bills were passed."Our hope is that these cells will provide a valuable resource for tissue repair and for engineered organs as well," said Dr. Anthony Atala, head of Wake Forest's regenerative medicine institute and senior researcher on the project. I give alongside a photo of him in his lab. At least future generations have some hope!
@jen20619 (1302)
• Ireland
22 Dec 06
this is interesting