There is a person I know on the Internet who's constantly asking me to call him

Hong Kong
December 23, 2006 5:10am CST
Isn't this person wierd!? I wonder if he's gay.But I mean come on,if he's gay then why he spends so much time talk to a girl on the internet?!
3 responses
@msqtech (15226)
• United States
3 Jan 07
dont mess with him it sounds bad
1 person likes this
• Hong Kong
3 Jan 07
yeah,now he's just history,I haven't talked to him since.Thanks for your response.
@cclay34 (488)
• United States
3 Jan 07
Well............ If you have been spending a lot of time talking to him on the internet then maybe he assumes that you are interested in him. If this is the case then he obviously is interested in you and wishs to go one step farther, it would only be natural of him to do this. From your photo we can all see that you are a very attractive lady and if he didnt attempt to form a relationship with you then I would certianly think he was gay. There is absolutely nothing wrong with contacting someone you met on the internet by phone if you feel that you are safe from harm. I met my wife on the internet, we talked in chat rooms for about a year and as the friendship progressed I eventualy talked to her several times on the telephone. When we eventualy met in person almost two years later it was as if I was meeting a dear friend, We eventualy fell in love and were married. If you do not wish to pursue a relationship then maybe you should say so clearly in the beginning when you first meet people on the internet. Some people arent just looking to chat and if not told in the beginning they some times get the wrong signal
@msqtech (15226)
• United States
3 Jan 07
It was the day when people would give a present or Christmas 'box' to those who had worked for them throughout the year. This is still done in Britain for postmen and paper-boys - though now the 'box' is usually given before Christmas, not after. In feudal times, Christmas was a reason for a gathering of extended families. All the serfs would gather their families in the manor of their lord, which made it easier for the lord of the estate to hand out annual stipends to the serfs. After all the Christmas parties on 26 December, the lord of the estate would give practical goods such as cloth, grains, and tools to the serfs who lived on his land. Each family would get a box full of such goods the day after Christmas. Under this explanation, there was nothing voluntary about this transaction; the lord of the manor was obliged to supply these goods. Because of the boxes being given out, the day was called Boxing Day. In England many years ago, it was common practice for the servants to carry boxes to their employers when they arrived for their day's work on the day after Christmas. Their employers would then put coins in the boxes as special end-of-year gifts. This can be compared with the modern day concept of Christmas bonuses. The servants carried boxes for the coins, hence the name Boxing Day. In churches, it was traditional to open the church's donation box on Christmas Day, and the money in the donation box was to be distributed to the poorer or lower class citizens on the next day. In this case, the "box" in "Boxing Day" comes from that lockbox in which the donations were left. Boxing Day was the day when the wren, the king of birds,[3] was captured and put in a box and introduced to each household in the village when he would be asked for a successful year and a good harvest. See Frazer's Golden Bough. this is from wikipedia