why are people so beauty conscious

@swasti (1157)
India
December 26, 2006 6:01am CST
I see many people,especially women are behind beauty and spend lot of their times in beauty parlours.actually does it all help?? our looks r given by god and y dont we accept them as it is . also when we ask some 1 "wat kind of a girl will u like to choose" ..the first reply that comes to mind is that the girl has to be beautiful. wat really does beauty do in our lives? only if we r wokring some tv ads , shows ,it may be required to a certain extent. but in normal day to day life....it is more important to have a real loving person around us.. wat do u think..voice ur views!!!
6 people like this
101 responses
• United States
26 Dec 06
I really think the concept of beauty evolves, grows and changes as we age. What we think makes us beautiful is definitely differnt at age 20 than age 50. I consider myself an average, ordinary, blend-into-the-crowd looking woman. Not butt-ugly by any means, but not head-turning "hot" anymore either. My head-turning "hot" days were between the ages 25-35. At 25, I finally figured out the "look" that defined me as "hot" and by the time I was 35, I was just plain tired of maintaining that look and the type of "player" men I was attracting. I asked God to send me someone who would love me, just for me - no matter what I look like. He didn't have to be GQ handsome or have money oozing out of his pockets. Just someone who knew and applied the definations of loyality, honesty, trustworthy, kindness, patience and respect to their everyday lives. Shortly after, Greg came into my life and we've been together over 11 years now. We're just two average, ordinary people, pushing 50 years old and aging as gracefully as possible without all the fancy new age-defying medical technology. I am beginning to see more and more of my mom when I look in the mirror these days, but sometimes I catch a glimps of that "hot" me of yester-year and know that part of me is still there for the taking. However, over the years, I grown to love the "every-day, ordinary" that brings so much joy to my life. For me, it turned out to be more important to have a real loving person in my life than the continual struggle to live up to "society beautiful."
2 people like this
@swasti (1157)
• India
27 Dec 06
good for u !! nice to hear that many people are not really beauty consious.and there are many people who respect feelings and emotions .
• United States
26 Dec 06
Beauty is important even though we really don't want it to be. If I don't do my hair or wear makeup when I go somewhere I don't feel as pretty and in turn I don't feel very confident. I guess that is because I know everyone else is so beauty conscious that they are judging me.
• United States
26 Dec 06
True...it is human nature... what pleases the eye makes you comfortable to be around with and vice versa... it is only a prob when it becomes an obsession, or when people are only judged by looks (which unfortunately is happening even in areas that don't need looks)...
@Traotor (27)
• Romania
26 Dec 06
When you see a girl who look good,be sure that she makes beaty tratament,it's not only what you have from THE GOD.
1 person likes this
@swasti (1157)
• India
27 Dec 06
very funny. jus by doing make up one cant really look good. it will only imprve some one's looks
• India
26 Dec 06
it is the naturel think.about the godgift is the women is the their beauty. all men have mad their beauty.
1 person likes this
@lulylove (1561)
• Brazil
27 Dec 06
I think that women are not made alone of beauty, but yes of content, therefore you can namorar a very pretty woman, but complete idióta, or namorar somebody interesting, and pretty, however very not very PRETTY to its eyes.
@Ravenladyj (22937)
• United States
26 Dec 06
I think medias version of "beauty" is HIGHLY over-rated....I'm not an ugly woman by any means but I dont have the patience time or desire to be spending hours doin my hair, nails, making sure my clothes are co-ordinated with my shoes and purse blah blah blah....So long as I'm healthy and practice great hygiene I'm cool with that....I wasnt put on this earth to impress ppl or be treated like an object ya know....I've no time for that myself BUT I also have a very strong personality and tons of confidence more often than not so I have no need to make me a "pretty package" you either like me for who I am or you dont end of story...
1 person likes this
@swasti (1157)
• India
27 Dec 06
yeah i totally agree with u . It is enough we have confidence in ourselves instead of really bortheing what oteh repople will think of us.
• India
1 Jan 07
people think, being beautiful make the presence in the public..its human psychology.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Jan 07
Nature uses beauty to attract and different species use it for different reasons. The elements of beauty are used to attract mating as well as find prey. The difference in our species we can define beauty as more than the cover we see. The person inside could be very ugly and while beauty is may only be skin deep ugly is to the bone.
• India
1 Jan 07
Yaa whole lot of people are concious specially womens about beauty and looks. But its not necessary to go beautiparlour to make oneself beautiful. GOd has created very beautiful species of human being. So beauty counts from inside not from outside. No one will love you if you have beautiful face but ugly nature.
@utsadetti (4589)
• United States
1 Jan 07
Beauty conscious? Yeah, it is. beacause beauty is the first thing that can attract other people's attention to. It is the first issue to get rich, to get handsome man, to get money and to get everything you want to, if you are beautiful.
1 person likes this
@achumama (506)
• India
27 Dec 06
because its a human nature to be beautiful and to do beautiful things..with out this there will not be any beautiful things in the world..
1 person likes this
• Philippines
27 Dec 06
Yes!! God's gift..but you need to develop it...it doesnt mean that you will do nothing..even personal hygiene!! hehe you should look good and presentable all the time..we all know fashion is also changing time to time..so dont get left behind..best way to attract others..cause it reflects what you are inside..and remember first impression last..
@hcprasad (1013)
• India
26 Dec 06
Amongst 6 major tastes, beauty is also a taste. Everybody inherits it at the time of birth by god. Some look for external beauty where you have to spend money and some look for internal beauty(heart) where time has to be spent for purification.
1 person likes this
• India
26 Dec 06
People are indeed very beauty consious coz everyone needs someone who is as much beautiful as him/her..it is a scientifically explained phenomenon..of course there are contradictions too but not most of the time..
• India
26 Dec 06
well today is an era where a person really need to look beautiful to stand in the society..its gives an individual some sort of a confidence...today a male thinks that he just just just need the most beatyful women in this world and a female thinks that his men shud be the smartest guy in d world..so everyone thinking over this issue only wanna look the best to form the best couple..so that they can show the entire world which is full of competition i must say that they r the best and there is no onne who cud compete with them...
1 person likes this
• India
27 Dec 06
“Beauty is Nature’s coin,” John Milton wrote in 1634. It is currency in today’s labor market as well. Since 1994, numerous studies have found that workers of above- average beauty earn 5 to 15 percent more than those with below-average looks. “Those differences are of a similar order of magnitude as the premiums we associate with race and gender,” says associate professor of economics Markus Mobius. Most research on what creates this beauty gap has relied on observational and empirical data. But in “Why Beauty Matters,” published recently in The American Economic Review, Mobius and Tanya Rosenblat, professor of economics at Wesleyan University, designed a novel experiment to “decompose” the root causes of the “beauty premium.” “We attribute all kinds of positive things to people who look good,” says Mobius. “We think they are smarter, more sexually active, wealthier, and generally happier people, so why not think that they’re more productive and better at doing certain things?” Or “pure discrimination” could be a cause: take the case of a boss who likes having attractive workers around and so passes over the plain and ordinary. There may also be skills associated with beauty: pretty children, favored by teachers and peers, may acquire better social skills that enable them to negotiate higher wages, explains Mobius. Social psychologists have shown that these positive expectations in turn boost confidence, he adds, citing another quality known to increase wages. Determining which factors produce the beauty premium—and to what degree—means going inside the “black box” of the negotiation process. “We don’t really know what’s going on when a worker is being interviewed,” notes Mobius. Does the employer decide the worker has certain attributes, or does the worker convince the employer of those attributes? “In an experiment, because you can create an artificial labor market, you can very easily control how employer and worker interact. You can also know precisely what the worker’s confidence is when he goes into the negotiation, because you can ask him [beforehand].” To create their experimental market, Mobius and Rosenblat used a computer game for which beauty was not a factor in the “labor” involved—solving as many mazes as possible in 15 minutes. They had passport-style photos taken of all participants (330 university students in Argentina), who were rated on a scale of 1 to 5 (“plain” to “above-average beautiful”) by high-school students. Each experimental session involved 10 participants, half playing “workers” and half “employers.” Workers solved a practice maze and then estimated how many they could solve during their quarter-hour “employment”—a measure of confidence. To isolate various “channels” in the negotiation process, Mobius and Rosenblat assigned each employer a different mode of reviewing workers: one saw only résumés (baseline), while the others also utilized either a photograph (visual), a phone interview (oral), a photograph and phone interview (visual and oral), or a photograph and a face-to-face interview. Employers then estimated the expect- ed productivity of each worker, which counted as his or her “wages.” Who “won” this game? Beautiful workers “earned” wages 12 to 17 percent higher than their ordinary-looking coworkers, Mobius and Rosenblat found, even though their maze-solving productivity was no greater. There was no beauty premium when employers saw résumés only, but there was a 12 to 13 percent wage increase when they used photographs, phone calls, or both. In the case of face-to-face interviews, the beauty premium was 17 percent. Mobius and Rosenblat identified three channels through which physical attractiveness increased an employer’s estimate of a worker’s ability, and their relative importance. The visual stereotype, that more attractive people are more productive, accounted for 40 percent of the beauty premium. Attractive workers also displayed greater confidence, by giving higher estimates of their predicted productivity, a channel producing 20 percent of the beauty gap. The most surprising result, however, was that “beautiful people perform better even in telephone conversations, where their beauty isn’t obvious,” says Mobius. The oral stereotype, by which the conversational skills of attractive workers suggest capability sight unseen, accounted for the entire remaining 40 percent of the beauty premium. “There hasn’t been any hard evidence on the last two channels before,” Mobius notes. But the policy implications of these findings are less clear. Moving to “blind” phone interviews, for instance, would block the face-to-face channel for visual stereotyping (40 percent), but leave open the channels for confidence and oral stereotyping (20 and 40 percent), Mobius points out. Employers could eliminate interviews entirely and hire only via print résumés (without pictures), but that, he believes, would be “too extreme.” Although such a policy would eradicate most of the beauty premium, the losses would outweigh the gains. “The tradeoff is: ‘How important is it to reduce discrimination against not-so-beautiful people,’ [compared with] ‘How important is it to allocate people efficiently in the labor market?’” Mobius says. “Eradicating it completely by going to typed CVs without any human interaction wouldn’t be worth it. The productivity loss of assigning applicants wrongly would be much higher than the reduction in discrimination against the less beautiful.” The right policy conclusion for “Why Beauty Matters” may be to do nothing, Mobius concludes. But he also imagines a follow-up experiment with an additional “consciousness-raising” component. “We could use a training manual for a second group of employers, giving them evidence on what sort of factors tend to matter. If we show them pictures of four different employees and [report] that their productivity was the same, then perhaps the employers would be less likely to fall victim to these stereotypes.” If so, perhaps the labor market would function according to another famous adage: “Handsome is as handsome does.”
1 person likes this
• India
27 Dec 06
yes i totallt agree.but beauty depends on person or more precisely it lies in the eyes of the beholder
1 person likes this
• India
27 Dec 06
beauty should not be of outside i.e face but real beauty is of inside. If fact if the beauty parlours time diverted to in any social work or helping the poor peopoles then that person will be called as more beutiful.
1 person likes this
@nishdan01 (3055)
• Singapore
27 Dec 06
Beauty is skin deep.More people including men are beauty conscious.Beautyfying themselves increases self esteem and self confidence.It is the latest trend.If affordable financially there is nothing wrong in beautyfying.
1 person likes this
• India
27 Dec 06
U must have heard ' First impression is the last impression '. Most of the ppl do not have the guts to talk in the first meeting.So its just the looks that attracts. So unless a guy / gal is beautiful he/she wont attract their mates. Otherwise u should be smart enuff to hold a witty conversation if u lack in good looks.
1 person likes this
@cuddiluk (1523)
• Philippines
27 Dec 06
To start loving by the others love yourself first. It helps decrease emotional stress. What if your friend told you, "Hey your pimps bumping out!, you look 40's now than before, what happen?" What will be your feeling for this? Of course, you feel annoyed and ashamed for yourself. What if someone told you, "Hey you look pretty today, and blooming!Do have any secrets for that?" Of course you got flattered of his impression to you. Thus, personal hygiene is important in every aspect of our lives. Its boost our self-confidence and trust to once self.