The first American soldier to refuse deployment in Iraq

@catchre (407)
Philippines
January 4, 2007 12:46am CST
Lt. Ehren Watada is the first American soldier to refuse deployment in Iraq. Do you consider him a bigot and a traitor to his country? Should American soldiers imitate this kind of insubordination? What are your thoughts on this? Would you prefer your military to think first before they follow commands? Here is the link: www.hotzone.yahoo.com/b/hotzone/blogs19056
1 person likes this
5 responses
• Philippines
4 Jan 07
A soldier must obey lawful orders. Deployment in Iraq I think is lawful so there's no reason for that soldier to refuse. If he refuses, he should be dealt with accordingly. For me, that soldier must be dismissed from the service. He has no valid reason to stay any longer in the military. He is not a good example to others and to the whole military command. If refusal would be allowed, suppose there is war and soldiers would not like to go to war, what will happen? How shall the military defend the country?
@catchre (407)
• Philippines
4 Jan 07
I think now, it's going to be more of a question of morality or loyalty? With the minimal punishment for insubordination, would more soldiers think twice before going to Iraq? Will the civilians still sign up for the army?
@Perry2007 (2229)
• Philippines
4 Jan 07
First Watada is a native of Japan, perhaps naturalized American, can you immagine the first american soldier to refuse deployment to Iraq is a Japanese. Anyway, this is a personal choise, every individual has the right to this, He alone will bear the consecuenses of his action, whatever we say now, however people will react to him is also thier own opinion, the same as he has his own.
@catchre (407)
• Philippines
4 Jan 07
I think chuggs has a point - Watada took an oath in the army, the American army. It doesn't matter if he is Japanese or whatever his nationality is. With what you are saying, it only denotes that the Japanese (or other nationalities) shouldn't be allowed in the US army because their loyalty will never be described as patriotic to the American military principles and policies.
@chuggs (314)
• United States
4 Jan 07
My only thought is that this man should have thought about it when he joined the military. When you join you take an oath. If you dissobey orders and do not fight than you should at the very least be kicked out of the military. I do not really think him a traitor, but I think he is trying to get his name in the spotlight. Could be wrong though.
@catchre (407)
• Philippines
4 Jan 07
Well, his act of disobedience only equals to 6 six years in prison. That's not too bad and too long a sentence so I guess those who are willing to fight for their ideals would now start disobeying orders and risk being thrown into prison and thrown out of the army.
• United States
20 Jan 07
Being that my fiance` is an army recrutier i see everyday people tryintg to back out of there contract. I think they are stupid. When they take the oath to serve their country they should know what there getting into. It upsets me when these people do this.I don't see him as a traitor not at all. i see him as getting scared. yet at the same time he knew what he was doing when he took the oath and he needs to serve out his time.
• United States
4 Jan 07
What are his reasons for not wanting to go to Iraq? But when joining the miitary, you are expected to follow orders. So when he decided not to follow orders, he is in jepordy of a court martial. The lowest form of punishment can be a dishonorable discharge, which will follow him for the rest of his life, when he seeks employment.