My gfather's family came to America from Sicily in the 1910s.

@Bee1955 (3887)
United States
January 4, 2007 12:53pm CST
Yet I know little or none about them and most have died off. Dont you wish that you paid attention to the older generations when they were alive so you could tell your children and grandchildren your family's history? I'm sorry now that I have questions and no one around to answer.
3 responses
5 Jan 07
A great post above mine with some good advice. The Ellis Island website should also hopefully be able to turn up the ship's passenger list (if they arrived at New York - most did). That will give you more vital info - who they were going to stay with (and where) and their relationship to them. Also, their closest relation back home, and their address. Be sure to check the entire passenger list for your grandfather's ship - often whole extended families travelled together, so you might get even more than you bargained for. It's a free website, but if that doesn't turn up the info, Ancestry.com, which has lists for other ports gives a 14-day free trial. Should be long enough to get what you need.
1 person likes this
• United States
4 Jan 07
I was raised almost from birth to be interested in genealogy and family history. My mother's side of the family has been active in it since the mid 1800's and it's always been a tradition for us. And most of my extended family, when I was a young child, were much much older than the norm. I was raised by my maternal grandparents and they came from huge families and they were all older. I remember hearing stories about the family as a child and as I got older it fostered my interest in genealogy. It wasn't until I was an adult though, that I started to record some of the stories I had heard. And by then most of the family was gone. So over the last 13 years, I've tried very hard to document as much as I can. That includes transcribing old family journals and letters that I have come across. Each one of these items adds one more piece to the puzzle. And I've also been working on writing my own history for posterity. It may seem like it is too late to have questions answered but you may find answers to those questions in some unlikely places. From newspaper articles, old journals or letters, public records, church records, school records, medical records and much much more. Even a census can tell you so much. And if your family came to America in the 1910's, there's bound to be a census for 1920 and 1930 there. You might find some clues there! You never know and never give up. Best of luck in your hunt and don't feel bad, I'm sure we all could have done more when it comes to our ancestors and posterity. The most important thing though is that you're doing it now.
@Sawsen (795)
• United States
4 Jan 07
Well, my grandparents are from Palestine. So are my parents. I know quite a lot about Palestinian history, because I lived there for a few years. But I marred a Lebanese man, so now it's going to be interesting for our baby. I think Sicily is a beautiful country though. And I agree with you, it's good to ask them the questions while they're alive, before it's too late. And then you'll be left with a lot of unanswered questions.
1 person likes this