What's the relationship between writing and reading?

Philippines
January 27, 2007 5:48am CST
Are they in any way linked? Help me to answer this question guys. Thanks and good luck.
2 people like this
7 responses
@omidmao (744)
• India
27 Jan 07
i can say one thing , those who can read good , can write better , good luck
4 people like this
• Philippines
27 Jan 07
Thanks for that response my friend. By the way, what is your reason why we must read more books in order for us to be a better writter?
1 person likes this
@mashimaro (1097)
• Philippines
27 Jan 07
The relationship between writing and reading, I think , let put it this way, you cannot write if you can't read, you cannot read if you don't know how to write; vice versa.. I hope this things can help you to answer your questions. goodluck! Writing: Handwriting is a complex perceptual-motor skill. The first stage in handwriting is to retrieve a specific sequence of strokes (motor pattern) from long term memory. The second stage incorporates the specifications of parameters such as size, speed and accuracy. The final stage is the execution of the program. Here the appropriate number of motor units are recruited to carry out the movements for the desired outcome. These processes are executed sequentially, however, letters are not often written as isolated units, but rather form parts of words. Fluent writing, therefore, necessitates parallel processing in addition to sequential processing. Once established, spatio-temporal motor programs are said to be able to produce a smooth, accurate product and possess the quality of energy efficiency. Many people fail to realise the importance of teaching the correct formation of the letters and numbers from the very start of teaching the written language. Unless children write correctly, they do not see the correct symbols for the sounds, and motor patterns once established are difficult to correct. Small errors prevent children from learning to write easily, legibly and neatly. They require careful and continued teaching of all the techniques and for those struggling, extensive practice. In writing, the brain directs the hand. This cannot be done correctly unless there is a thorough knowledge of how each letter and number is made. Precise techniques for good easy handwriting and for accurate pronunciation must be taught from the very start because of the great importance of learning phonograms and words by writing them directly from hearing and saying them aloud. It is also necessary to ensure that poor motor patterns are not established since they are hard to break. Manuscript (print) is always taught to beginners (Kindergarten) because its close resemblance to print enables students who can write a word from dictation to recognise it at a glance when they see it in print. The writing process does the most to unite speech, spelling and reading. Thus, the teaching of handwriting and written spelling should precede reading from books. Handwriting problems vary in terms of severity, cause and impact. The handwriting of most LD individuals is variable in terms of letter formation, size, slant, spacing, speed, duration of intra-task (letter or word) pauses, and recorded velocity profiles. This is because they have not yet developed stable and reproducible motor programs for writing movements. It is interesting to note that no clear relationship between grip and writing speed and accuracy has been demonstrated. The relationship between grip and writing endurance has yet to be studied and may be critical to functional performance. It may well be that certain grips lead to the development of excessive muscular tension and early fatigue. When teaching handwriting, it is important to guide the learner through the movement with verbal and physical prompting. The use of visual and kinaesthetic feedback is important, particularly in the early stages of acquisition, for the detection of errors and the on-going development of an "invariant" program. Allowing adequate time for practice is of vital importance in order to ensure that students reach the point of automaticity. This is reached when the program can carry out long strings of movement in the absence of attention, allowing the learner to attend to other aspects of the environment such as listening, comprehension, spelling and composition. Children with LD's typically have a history of reading/spelling and/or writing problems. Frustration and/or anxiety often leads to avoidance behaviour. It is therefore important to approach handwriting in a way in which it makes sense to them - explicit instructions, encouragement for small improvements and forgiveness for less than perfect work! Reading: It is essential to read to students daily and have them read aloud to you. How children read aloud tells you what they are doing when they read silently. Children often insert or substitute their own words, or omit words in reading. Reading aloud reveals this bad habit. This teaches the important habit of reading accurately and is vital in mathematics and other subjects for that matter. Much practice is needed to develop the habit of reading accurately. Reading aloud also develops the habit of precise enunciation and improves both vocabulary and grammar. This practice in the skills of reading as well as learning to get the ideas from the printed page is essential. Correct meanings can only be learned from accurate reading. A knowledge of phonics is a prerequisite to accurate reading. The knowledge obtained in spelling leads to fluent and accurate reading. A good reader is self-monitoring and self-correcting, able to flow across the page and extract meaning from content. Good readers are competent in three areas: auditory (word attack), visual (sight words) and language (vocabulary, syntax, semantics). Encourage children to savour the language because it produces satisfying pictures in the mind's eye. Take time to appreciate the well- turned phrase, to admire or censure a happening, to read again a part that is especially worthy. In these ways children develop a taste for good literature and become more discerning in their choice of reading materials. Reading needs to be directed, individualised and made the gateway to knowledge and wisdom.
2 people like this
• Philippines
27 Jan 07
Hmmm wow, thats one great response. I marked it as best. We can edit that and then we can use that response posible to other inquirer. Thanks for that big ang huge and useful response. More power my friend.
1 person likes this
@mashimaro (1097)
• Philippines
28 Jan 07
I'm very glad that I helped you. your welcome. and goodluck!
1 person likes this
• Indonesia
27 Jan 07
yes. reading is about how you see the world. we know that books are the world's window and writing is about how you understand the world, how you understand what you've seen. So, i recomend you to write what you read. its fun and very useful.
2 people like this
• Philippines
27 Jan 07
Thanks for responding my friend. In fact, there is a saying that says "reading makes a full man." More power to you and thanks for answering.
1 person likes this
@carmat (2850)
• Canada
5 Feb 07
I guess Ive never thought of it before but would you be able to write if you couldnt read. I think that you would have to be able to read to know what you are writing. Agree or disagree.
@inovator (603)
• Philippines
10 Feb 07
hm...well for me....if you can read you can also write....but it doest mean you understand it...heheh...sorry i have no clear explanation....i hope you get my pont....
@katcarneo (1433)
• Philippines
7 Feb 07
I think reading makes one a better writer (that's true for me) and writing makes one appreciate reading better.
@Lydia1901 (16354)
• United States
6 Feb 07
I think the reationship that they have is if you can't write maybe you might not read at all. So you got to have one and the other to make it work.