My dog has seizures, but they aren't like what I think of...

United States
February 6, 2007 6:24pm CST
My 2 year old dog just started having seizures in December. He has had 2 so far. It is such a horrible thing to watch. He doesn't convulse like you would think of when you hear the word seizure. Instead his whole back end appears to be paralyzed, his front legs stiff. He appears to be somewhat alert as he wags his tail when talked to and tries to stand up. When he had the first one, I thought he was choking or something as it was not like any seizure I have ever seen. It lasts about 45 seconds to 2 minutes, and then an added 2-4 minutes for him to fully recover. I took him to the vet after his first one (that I saw) and they ran a bunch of tests on him. She said all the tests came back normal and she thought it was seizures. She said that as long as it doesn't happen more than once a month or last longer than 5 minutes there is no need to put him on any medication. She told me the Do's and Don'ts Do: talk to him and comfort him; be sure to remove all dangerous objects so he won't hurt himself; give him water or ice cubes after he has fully recovered; let him sleep. Don't: try to hold him down; cover him; get close to his mouth; try to hold his tongue or put anything in his mouth. After his "seizures" he eats a lot of ice. The vet says it will help to bring his body temperature back down to normal so I let him eat however much he wants, and it has been a lot. Then he seems to get very hyper for about half an hour, then gets extremely affectionate, and then he sleeps a lot. Does your dog have seizures, and are they anything like this? What do you do for your pet? Did they start out far apart and eventually get closer together timewise? What kind of medications do they get? I could really use some other experienced knowledge... Thanks!
6 people like this
15 responses
@Rittings (673)
7 Feb 07
This sounds like the effects of sugar to me. Could it be that your dog suffers from some sort of sugar disorder (like diabetes)?? Without really seeing the seizures it's hard to make a judgement on what is going on. But you have to remember that every dog or persons seizures will be different from each other, because we all deal with them very differently. I most certainly would ask for the blood sugar levelling of your dog to be checked out. Possible even get a second opinion from a different vet. Love and light to you and your friend (who looks incredibly cute by the way!!).
2 people like this
• United States
7 Feb 07
This is definitely something I will have to check into. I guess I never thought about it to be honest. We try not to give our pets anything with sugar in it. We will definitely be watching it closer. And getting a second opinion is my next priority. I hate to think that it could be something serious that the 1st vet missed. Thank you for your response... and he is incredibly cute!
1 person likes this
@Rittings (673)
7 Feb 07
Yeah, I would most certainly get a second opinion. It's so hard to diagnose problems with animals. Unlike humans, they can't tell you how they are feeling or about any pains anywhere... ;) My old dog was diagnosed with arthritis by one vets, and within 12 months she was a mess. Took her back to the vets who said she was very very ill and needed to be put to sleep. I could not just accept this so we took her to a second vets, and he did loads of tests on her and eventually we found that she had a lot of water in her tummy and around her organs. A few water tablets later and she was great. And went on to live another 2 years! (she was pretty old in the first place.. but I guess you know how much you fall in love with them! *blush). So it's always smart to get a 2nd opinion if you are not happy with the first. I know how stressed you must be right now though. My dogs are my world, and I love them to pieces. So I hope that your best friend will be ok ... give him a big hug from me. Love and light.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
Wow, I agree with the need for a second opinion... Do you have a new doggie? Thanks so much for your encouragment, it helps so much in what is definitely a stressful situation. He is my best friend... funny how that happens. Thanks again! ***HUGS***
@speakeasy (4215)
• United States
7 Feb 07
I don't have a dog with this problem but I did ask a friend of mine who works for a vet and it isn't good. She said there are only 2 conditions she knew of that can cause the type of seizure your dog is having: epilepsy and brain damage. Epilepsy has several different types of seizure - minor ones where they just "go blank" for a couple of minutes to the "grand mal" convulsions. Without medication, the seizures can and will get more frequent. Even with medication, it can get to the point where the medication no longer works. Normally, the type of seizure you described is the type an animal will have after the medication no longer works (paralyzing seizure). She said the type of medication depends on a couple of different factors and it is up to your vet; which one and how frequently they should be taken. Brain damage - could have been caused by a fever or other illness; a blow to the head; poisoning; or even a brain tumor. IF the dog has no other symptoms or behavior changes; it is "probably" not a tumor. Brain damage may remain stable or get worse depending on the cause and whether the dog has any additional head injuries. Medications may or may not work to prevent this type of seizure. Brain damage would usually not show up in tests unless the damage was extensive and then there would be other symptoms. If the dog is not having daily (or more frequent) seizures, she said you might not want to medicate because of the side effects. She also said there are some herbal remedies you can try. Unless your dog is allergic to one of the ingrediants - "they won't hurt him and they might help". She said you can get them on-line, from a catalog, or in some of the bigger pet stores. She also said keeping him calm and not making a big deal out of his seizures will help him handle them better himself; dogs are very excepting creatures. Sorry, I don't have any better news for you.
• United States
7 Feb 07
Wow. This sucks. Thanks for finding out for me. I had wondered about the damage thing. We had him tested for poisoning but they came back negative. It just is so unreal that it started now, after 2 years. I guess I better keep a close eye on him, and find out more from my vet. Thank you for the information, even though it isn't good. Honesty is all I ask for.
@Rittings (673)
7 Feb 07
Not necessarily. Sugar balancing (or lack of it) can cause animal seizures. My aunties dog had problems of seizures. Though epilepsy is a high concern also, but it's the hyper and hypo conditions that your dog is showing that makes me think it's sugar.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
How do you know if it is sugar???? They would have tested for that, wouldn't they? ARGGGG... so frustrating.
• United States
8 Feb 07
This never happened to my dogs but this advice might help... Watch him and record his normal activties though out the day a record how often he has his seizes and around what time of day and then where he usally is when it happens.He could be having a food reaction or if something like flea medication or something minor like that or it could be somthing that sacres him.just try that for now hopfully this helps u.
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Feb 07
omg! im sorry, this is what happens when you leave the computer screen up and let cousins in the media room! well now you have responces from another person lol!
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Feb 07
It isn't a big deal. Actually, we had just wondered about that. Thank you!!!!
• United States
7 Feb 07
My sister's chihuahua has seizures, the same kind you described. When she took him to the vet she said that they were stress induced and to talk to him and hold him and take him to a secluded area like a room and just shut the door and pet him and try to comfort him.
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Feb 07
I definitely try to comfort him. Taking him anywhere is out as he is a 75 pound dog. Way too big for me to carry around. Plus, the vet told me not to hold him as when they have seizures it raises their body temperature. Adding more to it by restraining the muscles or passing off your body heat is not good as high temp is what gives them brain damage. But I definitely do what I can for him. Thanks for the response!
@miryam (6507)
• Italy
7 Feb 07
Race dogs are subject to several illnesses, yours if I do not make a mistake is subject to epilepsy, you must cure him, if only vetertinario tries to hear another one, one can never. Mine has 12 hanni is a mestizo last year I have found a tumour cutaneous and suffers of arthrosis, also today he has had a crisis with the cold, was not walking any more, and have kept him in arm for half hour then was well. My dog for me is like a son, ... ... know it many say that it is absurd, but not me.
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Feb 07
Thank you for your response.
• India
7 Feb 07
plz show them to the vet, better a specialist in dog seizures...ha may be able to help u....
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
thanks you for your comment. We are working on it. Thanks again.
• United States
7 Feb 07
the dog i used to have, had a couple of siezers the last few months of his life. it was soo scary! he flopped around and well like i said it was scary. we had to hold him still so he wouldnt keep hitting his head. then after awhile it would stop and he'd get this look like he didnt know what had just hapended. it turned out that the first time it happended he was having a bad reaction to medication and the second time it was lack of blood flow getting through his body.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
That is soooo sad! I guess in a sense I could look at my dogs seizures and say that I am lucky he doesn't convulse. But I think the paralysis is just as scary. Thank you for your post!
• United States
7 Feb 07
Hi. I have A boxer who is now 7yrs old. She started having seizures about 3 yrs ago. Very scary. I too took her into the vet and all tests came back normal. We have not been giving her any meds as the vet does not think it is needed. Our dog does not have them to often. She sometimes gets them if she gets to excited. She pretty much acts the same as you described. her legs go limp and she falls to the floor. Afterwards she is very affecionate. I am sorry I am not much help but did want to let you know in our situation hers have not increased and they are farther apart now.
• United States
7 Feb 07
thank you, that is encouraging!!! My greatest fear is that they will eventually get so bad that I will have to put him to sleep or they will kill him. I just can't stand the thought. Nice to know that they don't always get worse.
@Undrsiege (110)
• United States
7 Feb 07
My dog who is 8 years old is epileptic, has a couple seizures every month and we put her on medication last year. She doesn't seem to have as many seizures but they still happen. It happens so often that I'm not really freaked out anymore, but one of the common things during her seizures is that she pees all over herself and foams at the mouth. After the seizure she seems extremely out of it, and she walks in circles and follows you. We end up letting her go outside while we clean up the puddle of pee. It usually takes her about 6-8 minutes for her to get back in focus. I remember the first time she had a seizure I was so freaked out, and the entire household had to just watch her until it was safe(for her) to communicate with her.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
Wow. Mine doesn't pee or foam. So I guess I am lucky there. It is just so sad... Thanks for the response.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
Seizures are awful to watch! I work in an animal hospital as a nurse (though my hours are really limited now that I have kids). In my experience, when a dog has chronic seizures and they come into the clinic, we will "phenobarb load" them. Which means, they get a dose of phonobarb every few hours to control the seizures and break the cycle. They are treated as needed with valium should they seizure between doses. They're usually pretty loopy from the phenobarb. After the seizures are controlled, the dog will go home with a prescription of phenobarb. Levels are checked every so often (monthly for a while, then every few months, as long as the seizures are controlled). Potassium Bromide (KBr) can also be added if the phenobarb doesn't control the seizures adequetly. Some dogs will have a seizure, then not another for many months/years. Others will have a true disorder and seizure on a regular basis. Good luck. I hope you fall in the former category!
• United States
7 Feb 07
Wow, that is something I didn't know. Kind of scary actually. To load them up like that... He isn't that bad right now. Hopefully he won't get that bad and we will be ok. Thanks for the response.
@dgee05 (14)
• Philippines
7 Feb 07
eventhough i haven't had this experience with my dogs but i know how horrible it feels to see your dog suffering like that. i hope your dog's seizures will lessen and always give your dog lots of care and affection. =p
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
Thank you soooo much for the encouragment! It is always welcome. And my dog is always getting affection and love, he is a part of the family!
@crickethear (1420)
• United States
7 Feb 07
I am so sorry about you dog having seizures. That must be awful to watch. I have a friend and his dog has seizures too. Romeo has the regular convulsing kind. He has to take medication every day for it. Even with the medication he still gets them, but not as bad. He too had a whole bunch of tests, and they all came back fine. He gets very insecure after having one, and just gets as close to you as he can. It breaks your heart.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
I think the insecurity is what causes Zeke to be so affectionate. I am sorry to hear about your friends dog, but at least they are trying to control it. I hope that Zeke's can be controlled, and that they don't get too bad. And yes, it breaks my heart. Thanks for your post!
@mari61960 (4895)
• United States
7 Feb 07
Fortunately my dogs have never had seizures. That's a terrible thing for a dog to suffer with. You can't tell them it's ok you can only comfort them. I would feel terrible if it happened to my dog. I wish I could be more helpful but I have no experience with it. Hopefully they will not become too regular and you can avoid medications.
• United States
7 Feb 07
That is what I am hoping! I hate the idea of having to medicate him! He is the first pet I have had who has had seizures. And you are right, you can only comfort them! Thanks for your response!
@jbrowsin66 (1322)
• United States
7 Feb 07
I haven't had any experience with this, but I think your post is good for some other pet owners that may encounter the same problem. Good luck.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
Thank you. I am glad that you haven't experienced it. It isn't pretty!
@shanhari (120)
• India
7 Feb 07
DOG GOD
• United States
7 Feb 07
And this responds to my post how??? Thanks.
@Rittings (673)
7 Feb 07
I think someone is just looking to get his post numbers up... I wouldn't unduly worry about them, I have loads on my discussions too. Just a few plonkers... hehe.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Feb 07
I would say so. Sad that they don't have anything worth saying to get the numbers up. O' well.