Changing Adoption Disclosure laws in Ontario

@Ravenladyj (22937)
United States
February 8, 2007 7:56am CST
As of Sept 2007 the changes in the Adoption Disclosure Act 2005 should be complete here's what this means "When fully implemented, the legislation will allow: an adopted person who is 18 years old or older to obtain a copy of his or her original birth record and adoption order. The adoptee would be able to learn his or her original name at birth. These documents may also provide identifying information about birth parents. a birth parent to obtain the information contained in the birth registration and the adoption order of the child they gave up for adoption, once that child reaches 19 years of age. These documents may provide identifying information about the adoptee, including his or her name after adoption. Any information about the adoptive parents would be removed. a birth parent or adoptee who does not wish to be contacted to put a "no contact" notice on his or her record. The individual who registers the "no contact" notice would be asked to voluntarily provide family and medical history and a brief statement about his or her reasons for filing a "no contact" notice. sanctions for violation of a "no contact" notice up to $50,000 for an individual or up to $250,000 for a corporation. birth parents and adoptees to apply to the Child and Family Services Review Board to prevent disclosure of identifying information where there are concerns for personal safety." (source: http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/mcss/english/pillars/community/questions/adoption/about_adopt_disclose_sys.htm ) Whether you are a Canadian or not, how do you feel about this sort of thing...do you think its fair or right or would you/are you against it? Why/Why not? I personally am THRILLED about it..its about time damn it! My adoptive mother on the other hand wont be in the slightest and for that matter has always had a problem with my being curious and made sure I knew it to the extreme... any thoughts
5 people like this
13 responses
• United States
8 Feb 07
I think it is good. I have and adopted daughter and she searched to find her birth father. When we adopted over 20 years ago you could sign that you wanted your birth child to find you after their 18th birthday. I think that its different for every adoptee. Some are very curious and some just don't want to know. With this new law if will make things easier for the curious adoptee's to find the family lineage.
@Ravenladyj (22937)
• United States
9 Feb 07
Very true...for me, due to my rotten upbringin it was and still is very very important to me...the father of my two older kids however never even wanted to talk about his biological parents let alone meet them...He harboured such hatred for them, particularly his mother..it was a shame really but the ppl that raised him are FABULOUS! I just adore his adoptive father, such a sweet sweet man!!
1 person likes this
@kriz10 (47)
• Canada
8 Feb 07
I think that the new legislation is good. It provides a good compromise for biological children and parents who wish to find each other but still protects the privacy of those who do not wish to be contacted. It's unfortunate, that your adoptive mother is against you finding your birth parents -- sound like maybe she feels threatend (or is it possible she is trying to protect you from something she feels may hurt you?) I hope that I am able to adopt some day, and I plan to allow and even help my child discover as much as they wish about where they came from.
2 people like this
@Ravenladyj (22937)
• United States
8 Feb 07
protecting me has never been something she's been concerned with...she's proven that since I was a child and her husband molested me in front of her on a regular basis...She says "its disrespectful and you have NO RIGHT" she's been saying that ever since was a kid.... I think its wonderful too...for a lot of reasons...main one being I want to know where my father is buried and #2 it'd be nice to put names to my bloodline ya know plus having medical history would be nice (though it was never updated) and if anything major were to come up with myself or my kids medically (my kids dad was also adopted) I would have a better chance tracking my bio family down to find out what has come up if anything in the bloodline....plus there is a chance that i might try to find my family on my dads side and possibly my mom but NOT her parents since they are the reason I was put up in the first place....I'd be the oldest of either of their kids (my mum and dad) so finding any half brothers or sisters would be really exciting for me too... and I think the fines are heavy enough that ppl wont mess around ya know...
• United States
8 Feb 07
I think it is a great idea. At 19 years of age I think a person is old enough to know for many reasons, especially health, who his/her biological parents are. I dont believe it would make any difference to how the person felt about their adoptive parents.
1 person likes this
@Ravenladyj (22937)
• United States
8 Feb 07
LOL no I'd still hate mine (adoptive parents) but they've earned it believe me...I think its a great idea too espeically when it comes to medical...my son ended up in the hospital when he was 2 and they had no medical background for him on my side or his fathers so it was definately scary since they couldnt figure out what the hell was wrong with him...so medical is definately something I'll be after...I tell ppl all the time who ahve given their kids up to UPDATE their files whenever possible when it comes to medical cause I'll tell ya, its scary not knowing what to keep an eye out for throughout your life ya know...
• Australia
9 Feb 07
I hope you are able to find all the information you need.
@Ravenladyj (22937)
• United States
9 Feb 07
thanks so much...I'm hoping too cause it's been a long time coming ya know..I've waited for yrs on the list so when I found this out by pure chance I was thrilled to say the least!
@sunshinecup (7881)
8 Feb 07
I think it's great really. It seems very fair with the opition of no contact,but still leaving the child information they may find useful. I agree about time. As for you, I am sorry to hear your exsperience. Just look at it this way, her loss.
1 person likes this
@Ravenladyj (22937)
• United States
9 Feb 07
oh it really is her loss...I mean not only is she missing out on me, my successes etc but she's missing out on my children as well which is a real shame because they are terrific...unfortunately they know 'gramma' doesnt really care for them (she shows it numerous ways) BUT luckily they have tons of ppl around them that love them and make up for it ya know..
@JJLoa44 (346)
• Canada
8 Feb 07
I think it's smart, and fair - it's part of what makes you you, and if you want to know you should be given options. I also think it's very smart that even if someone puts a no contact message up, they are asked to provide medical history, because that type of information could help save someone's life someday.
1 person likes this
@Ravenladyj (22937)
• United States
9 Feb 07
well any non identifying information (such as medical) has always been accessible unfortunately just getting to your case had a HUGE waiting list (you had to apply)..I was fortunate when I registered because it only took 5 yrs (for them to contact me and MISINFORM ME btw..long story) but it got to the point that the waiting list was as long as 8+ yrs!
1 person likes this
@brokentia (10396)
• United States
8 Feb 07
I say, about dang time the adoption courts realize there are legitimate reasons for the adoptee to want to know this information!!! And if a birth parent does not want to be contacted...at least the vital information is left as to why. But I think putting a fine on such occurrence should one contact the other had a no contact rule is not so good. What if that birth parent was forced into signing a no contact? What if that birth parent changed her mind? Is that birth parent allowed to remove the no contact signature? I am sure there are those kinks to work out...but I think it is a great step in the right direction!!!
1 person likes this
• India
9 Feb 07
well i am against it, ......yu have been adopted by someone and they cared for you the whole life till u became self reliant, they loved u like their own or more than that, now if u wanna know about ur real parents then that is insullting to them, i mean why do u wanna know abt those who didnt care abt u and gave u up for adoption?.......why do u wanna go back to them?.....i think u r mean and selfish if u hurt ur adoptive mother, she may even feel that she didnt rear u properly and that may hurt her..think abt it.......as far as i know....adoption is the greatest thing one can do....not even giving birth matches that..so love ur adoptive mother and dont hurt her.......
1 person likes this
• Australia
9 Feb 07
Everything seems fair and covered. I can't understand why adoptive parents would be against their adopted children wanting to know their biological origins PROVIDED they have been good parents. I know an adopted lady who had amazingly good adoptive parents. She knows that these people are her REAL parents because they are the ones who cared for her and made her what she is, a lovely lady, but I can understand her wanting to know who her biological parents were, and to meet them if possible. The adoptive parents have no need to feel threatened and they don't. I think it is only natural for a person to want to meet their biological parents and legislation that makes this possible must be good. I sincerely hope things turn out well for you.
• Philippines
9 Feb 07
i think it is right but for some reasons, iwant to protect my child, iw ant him privacy, i want him to live a normal life, as he grew up i would tell him that he is adopted but, i do not want him to contact his real parents,i am not selfish but i just want him to realize that there's no reason to contact them ,as they gave him to adoption and by doing that they let go of the rights to know where they child is..that is my own opinion,,i respect the others,, good day.. i am not a canadian, i am a filipina who adopted a baby who's mother left him in the hospital, she jsut left a letter that whoever adopt her baby she gave it willfully,a letter with a signature.. now my baby is four months old and he is doing well, good day to you...happyposting, you had a nice post,,,
1 person likes this
@linda345 (2661)
• Canada
9 Feb 07
I think it is a great change in the law. It protects both the child and the biologial parent. Also by putting a brief reason for the no contact order it might make the child feel better if they are looking for their birth parent. My brother is adopted. He never desired to go look for his birth parents. My parents told him if he wanted to they would fully support him.
1 person likes this
@mbarryton (1873)
• United States
9 Feb 07
im glad they are doing things like that. there are alot of mothers that would love to know how their kids turned out and im sure theres alot of kids that would want to know their true roots...good luck to you
1 person likes this
• Netherlands
9 Feb 07
I suppose it is a good thing to have the ability to easily obtain such information if you are so inclined. It is also good that it is possible to put a "no contact" clause in it as well. I can understand that one party would be sad if they were told that the other opted for the no contest but it does protect those who don't want to be found. It sounds fair enough to me.
1 person likes this
@cassidy22 (2975)
• United States
8 Feb 07
I think all adopted children have a RIGHT TO THEIR MEDICAL HISTORY! The parents and the child have a right to their privacy and to mark "no contact" I think that is fair. But everyone is entitled to their medical history and I think that is crucial.
1 person likes this